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Thread: Metering and Exposing Ektar 100

  1. #1

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    Metering and Exposing Ektar 100

    I apologize if this question has been asked before. I used the search function and didn't find anything relevant.

    I'm thinking about shooting some Ektar 100. Everything I've read says to shoot it like slide film. I've never shot slide film before, so how should I meter it? Meter for the highlights and set my exposure at 2 stops above the meter reading? How contrasty of a scene can it work well in? Everything I read about slide says a good rule of thumb is that shadows below zone III are blocked out and highlights above zone VII are blown. Is that true for Ektar as well?

  2. #2

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    Re: Metering and Exposing Ektar 100

    I'd be interested in hearing answers to this.
    I use Ektar 100 a lot and I expose it like a normal negative colour film and have no problems with that.
    I like the colours in Ektar 100 more than most other neg colour film. The colours are perhaps more like slide films.
    Perfection is a moving target.

  3. #3

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    Re: Metering and Exposing Ektar 100

    Quote Originally Posted by peteyj10 View Post
    I apologize if this question has been asked before. I used the search function and didn't find anything relevant.

    I'm thinking about shooting some Ektar 100. Everything I've read says to shoot it like slide film. I've never shot slide film before, so how should I meter it? Meter for the highlights and set my exposure at 2 stops above the meter reading? How contrasty of a scene can it work well in? Everything I read about slide says a good rule of thumb is that shadows below zone III are blocked out and highlights above zone VII are blown. Is that true for Ektar as well?
    No.

    EKTAR 100 has a wide range of exposure tolerance. I meter for it in exactly the same way I do for black and white panchromatic film and use the box speed of 100 ISO.



    RR

  4. #4
    A.K.A Lucky Bloke ;-)
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    Metering and Exposing Ektar 100

    Ditto. No differences in measuring light to expose one or other film. Of course you should be familiar with the emulsion's latitude and how diffuse is the light hitting the subject.
    If the sun is out I use rule 16 otherwise incident. If shooting landscapes from shade then I use the spotmeter.

  5. #5
    I live in Connecticut now.
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    Re: Metering and Exposing Ektar 100

    Quote Originally Posted by onnect17 View Post
    Ditto. No differences in measuring light to expose one or other film. Of course you should be familiar with the emulsion's latitude and how diffuse is the light hitting the subject.
    If the sun is out I use rule 16 otherwise incident. If shooting landscapes from shade then I use the spotmeter.
    That's sort of what the OP is asking... WHAT IS THE EXPOSURE LATITUDE RANGE.

    I've always had trouble getting what I want from Ektar100, I've always found Velvia50 easier to get the results I want.

    That's not to say Velvia is easier to expose, rather that when properly exposed I like the results better.

    I never spent enough time with Ektar to really hone in on the exact way to shoot it.

    I've heard many shoot it has less latitude than standard C-41 films so that's closer to slide film, and that they shoot it at EI80 often because the shadows tend to go blue in the late daylight.

    In the sun I would shoot it at 100 though.

    But again, I never spent a lot of time with it.

    So I would defer to others.

  6. #6

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    Re: Metering and Exposing Ektar 100

    I've never noticed a lower amount of latitude with Ektar100. Box speed and normal general-coverage or incident metering gives me good results.

  7. #7
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Metering and Exposing Ektar 100

    I've posted on this subject many times before on two different forums, and have routinely pissed people off, especially the "I can fix anything afterwards in
    Photoshop" crowd. Guess if people have a lot of time and money to waste and aren't after reliable results, than one can revert to that sloppy mentality. But the response always seems to be, "them Kodak people iss sure dumb and made thisssereer really bat product this time, by golly, cuz I cain't make hit look good even
    in Fauxtoshop". Garbage in/garbage out. Do it right in camera; get off on the correct foot to begin with, and leave the concept of "latitude" for Kodacolor Gold and disposable cardboard box cameras. If you want reliable results with Ektar, meter it just as carefully as you do chrome film. I use official box speed (100), but religiously filter for serious color temp issues with the appropriate exposure compensation. This is a different animal than other color neg films, including Portra products. You can't get away with the same things, but then the rewards are there too if you do things right. If you are working outdoors I strongly recommend
    carrying an 81A filter for bluish overcast skies, an 81C for deep blue shade under open blue skies, and maybe a light pink skylight filter for higher altitude UV issues
    or minor corrections. 90% of the complaints I hear about this film would be ended if this simple advice were followed. I had to learn the hard way.

  8. #8
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Metering and Exposing Ektar 100

    ... Oh, missed one point in your correction. In general, aim for the same midtone exposure as with an ASA 100 chrome film. But expect just about one stop more range into both the shadows and highlights as with typical chrome film, but distinctly less than in color neg films designed for portrait use. This is obviously a higher-contrast, higher saturation film. If you can routinely get good exposures on chromes, this product will present no problems to you other than accommodations to
    serious color temp discrepancies in subject lighting. For those who just like to shoot from the hip, or wing it like conventional color neg films, there will be problems. If you do err on the side of caution, it should be toward MODERATE over-exposure, not underexposure.
    When the shadow do fall, they fall hard.

  9. #9

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    Re: Metering and Exposing Ektar 100

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Wiley View Post
    ... Oh, missed one point in your correction. In general, aim for the same midtone exposure as with an ASA 100 chrome film. But expect just about one stop more range into both the shadows and highlights as with typical chrome film, but distinctly less than in color neg films designed for portrait use. This is obviously a higher-contrast, higher saturation film. If you can routinely get good exposures on chromes, this product will present no problems to you other than accommodations to
    serious color temp discrepancies in subject lighting. For those who just like to shoot from the hip, or wing it like conventional color neg films, there will be problems. If you do err on the side of caution, it should be toward MODERATE over-exposure, not underexposure.
    When the shadow do fall, they fall hard.
    +1 here.

    RR

  10. #10
    I live in Connecticut now.
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    Re: Metering and Exposing Ektar 100

    RR and Drew..

    The OPD specifically said that they had never used any kind of chrome film before, and so that's why they were inquiring as to any kind of specific things they should know in order to properly expose this film, from my understanding they have only used black-and-white and color negative films that have a large exposure latitude, so they were asking about how to properly meter for the shadows and the highlights etc. and since you don't really follow -n1 +n1 etc techniques with chrome films (to my knowledge) the procedure for proper exposure is different...

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