Page 10 of 20 FirstFirst ... 89101112 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 100 of 196

Thread: LF hikers ― is “Map & Compass” a dying art?

  1. #91

    Re: LF hikers ― is “Map & Compass” a dying art?

    I know how to orient with map and compass. All I need is my Silva, a good map, and a Rosary, and I'm good to go.

    Need to know true North from your part of the country though.

  2. #92

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Seattle, WA area
    Posts
    421

    Re: LF hikers ― is “Map & Compass” a dying art?

    Mountain navigation training for me was an integral part of the Seattle Mountaineers climbing course in 1970. I have no desire to carry modern electronic gadgetry, because that training has always seen me through even the most dire conditions. I carry topo maps (that’s plural) of appropriate scale for the outing, Silva Ranger compass, and never without the altimeter. At times even 10X binoculars for route finding. Here’s an abbreviated story that some may find interesting:

    Mid 70s, early in the year after winter of heavy snow, nice day, “hiking” with two buddies (overnight gear not for technical climbing).
    Goal: Mt. Daniel (WA), close to 8000 ft, not a particularly challenging mountain, except for the few summit peaks (not the goal).
    Attached image of east side (internet image, not mine). My pics from this outing not great.
    http://www.summitpost.org/images/medium/711817.jpg

    Approach from the steeper north side.
    Approaching 7200 ft, very steep/stable snow slope, STRONG steady updraft hits, whiteout sets in, zero visibility. It’s true – mountains make their own weather.
    Finally, a fairly level “bench” with boulders all around, drop the external-frame Kelty packs, one man to a boulder for windbreak, holler to communicate.
    “WHERE THE HELL ARE WE?” “DAMNED IF I KNOW, CAN’T SEE A THING!
    Gotta orient map, damned compass is going crazy … swinging every which way. Is this what hell is like? No, too friggin’ cold for that! Oh, what’s this? Rocks have funny orange streaks all over them… IRON, MAGNETIC! No wonder compass is crazy, gotta get away from these rocks for a reading, there that’s better. Ah, can get oriented now. Hope the barometer hasn’t changed much since the last altimeter check down lower.
    What’s that? Blue sky, small opening in whiteout, oops it’s gone, what did I just see? A small buttress through the opening? Check map closely, a little wiggle in the contour line just above us - about an eighth-inch wiggle, could that be what I saw, another opening, yeah that’s IT!
    “OK, GUYS, IT’S LESS THAN A HUNDRED YARDS TO THE RIDGE, THAT WAY, AND WE COULD BE OVER TO THE OTHER SIDE AND OUT OF THIS, LET’S GO.”
    Sure enough, whew, “I’m hungry and a bit parched.” “Yeah, me too, let’s eat.”
    Last edited by Jerry Bodine; 2-May-2012 at 17:03.

  3. #93
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    7,345

    Re: LF hikers ― is “Map & Compass” a dying art?

    I'm getting inspired. Think I'll start my own roadside gear stand and sell compasses with
    a little magnet hidden inside. Easier than printing fictitious topo maps.

  4. #94

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Pacifica, CA
    Posts
    1,145

    Re: LF hikers ― is “Map & Compass” a dying art?

    I think it's ironic that I take very few pictures during these life-threatening trips ... When they are the very experience I am looking to photograph ...

    I don't know if anybody mentioned this mundane reason to bring along map and compass: It is easier to caption your landscapes when you can clearly identify the peaks. (Assuming you don't use GPS).

  5. #95

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    261

    Re: LF hikers ― is “Map & Compass” a dying art?

    If I am an expert at anything, it is cross country hiking with topographic maps. Been an avid backpacker for 4 decades. For years I have usually hiked in unfamiliar ares while holding my maps in front of me. I almost always am aware of where I am on a crosscountry route especially on steep slope routes where being a bit off will land one in unpleasant class 3 and worse exposures. In the West one can usually see the terrain. So I rarely need to use a compass much less GPS except when in deeper forest where one cannot see landmarks. I also frequently night hike with headlamps and that is where I also always have my compass out in front of me. Obviously GPS would make nighthiking especially crosscountry easier at night.

  6. #96
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri, USA
    Posts
    1,560

    Re: LF hikers ― is “Map & Compass” a dying art?

    I find maps useful in planning any trip to unfamiliar territory, especially in urban jungles. I sure don't want to get lost there!

  7. #97

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Seattle Washington
    Posts
    99

    Re: LF hikers ― is “Map & Compass” a dying art?

    I have used a Silva Ranger as well for many years. They are a wonderful sighting compass. You set a bearing and hold the compass at arms length and look through the mirror to the matched needle. I was trained to use it in search and rescue training in the 1970's, with a good topo map they are very useful.

  8. #98

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    Posts
    6,686

    Re: LF hikers ― is “Map & Compass” a dying art?

    We still teach our Boy Scouts map and compass. The Army still teaches map & compass(at least when I was wearing fatigues.) Why would it be considered out dated? My real Swiss Army compass (with the mirror that hung below the bezel so you could read the direction when you took a sighting) just started loosing fluid after 25 years.
    I steal time at 1/125th of a second, so I don't consider my photography to be Fine Art as much as it is petty larceny.

  9. #99
    C. D. Keth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    1,800

    Re: LF hikers ― is “Map & Compass” a dying art?

    I don't think it's a dying art at all amongst those who go into the woods further than a trail takes them. I do think fewer people are going places where they might get lost, though. There's a whole lot of walking on fire roads and thinking it's some wild backcountry exploration.

  10. #100
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    7,345

    Re: LF hikers ― is “Map & Compass” a dying art?

    I have no problem in the woods or mtns, but I do get lost in Costco.

Similar Threads

  1. Difference between Art and Fine Art
    By kkeller in forum On Photography
    Replies: 71
    Last Post: 27-Aug-2009, 19:01
  2. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 5-Nov-2006, 16:23
  3. Art from the Heart
    By Graham Patterson in forum Announcements
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 5-Oct-2006, 12:20
  4. What is '"Art Photography"
    By Kirk Gittings in forum On Photography
    Replies: 67
    Last Post: 16-Feb-2005, 22:14
  5. What isn't "art?"
    By Robert A. Zeichner in forum On Photography
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 12-Feb-2005, 14:49

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •