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Thread: 6x9 technical camera

  1. #1

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    Jan 2013
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    6x9 technical camera

    Hello everyone:

    I would like to start taking pictures with a nice long lasting 6x9 technical camera. I am not sure if a field or a monorail will be better. My instinct says a monorail (if i am using technical cameras, i would like to have all technical movements).

    I am not afraid about technical idiosyncrasy. I have been using a mamiya 23 with a ground glass for a couple of years. And I love the big focusing screen for composing. I take pictures very slowly. My workflow is always the same. Plan. Find localization. Get together everything I need. Wait for appropiate wheather. Get there. Prepare. Take picture. Scan. Postproduce. Print.

    I have a Nikon Coolscan 9000 ED, that's why I am choosing 6x9 (I clean and postproduce every negative in my computer), also because i love that proportion when used horizontally.

    My first choice is the Cambo system. More exactly the 45SF or the 23 SF (4kg!).

    Pros: they have a digital update, not too old camera, not too expensive. I am located in Spain, Cambo is from the Netherlands, so replacements, lens boards, etc won't be a problem. Can be packed with relative ease. Universal G back. Still in production. Modular system.

    Cons: 4kg!!!!!!! (the SF23 is 3,8kg o.O) Not a lot of second hand.

    I would appreciate advice and experiences on 6x9 technical cameras. ¿Am I pointing in the right direction?

    By the way I plan spending 1000-1200eur in this system.

    Thanks a lot!!!


  2. #2

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    Re: 6x9 technical camera

    I spent about 5 years with a Horseman 980 6x9 field camera, had a lot of stuff with it, 65, 105, 150 Horseman lenses and a 270 Rodenstock Rotelar, sliding back to use ground glass with a roll holder and a 4x5 back. Started using more 4x5 and sold it for a Toyo aluminum field camera. Anyway the Horseman was a good camera, all but the 4x5 back fit nicely in a large Domke bag and wasn't too heavy. A lot of my favorite photos were taken with this set up.
    What you loose with a field camera is precision camera movements, you have some movements, but not nearly as nice as monorail, or the extension of a monorail if you are doing macro.

    Tom

  3. #3

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    Dec 1999
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    Re: 6x9 technical camera

    I enjoy medium format photography, and I used a Linhof Technika IV for a few years. It's a solid camera that's built like a tank. But, if you like wide angle photos, a Technika is limited. There's the Technika Master that facilitates wide angle lenses better, but it's expensive. (If you can find one.)

    I finally decided on an old-style Arca Swiss, when one became available on EBay for a reasonable price. After some fixups, and being lucky enough to find accessories, it's an excellent camera. But, parts are hard to find. (e.g. bag bellows, especially recessed lensboards, etc.)

    I see Arca Classic F's for sale on EBay. But, that's expensive!

    How about a flat bed, like a Shen Hao? They're lightweight. Or a lightweight 4x5 with the Graflok system that accepts bag bellows? (A bit clumsy, though.)

  4. #4

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    Re: 6x9 technical camera

    Take a look at a Linhof TK 23 or 45S or a Master Tecnika 3000 if you want to be able to go very wide easily.

  5. #5

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    755

    Re: 6x9 technical camera

    Not to be overlooked for a bit more panorama. 6X9 is a 3:2 ratio, so you get the benefit of a larger film format in the 35mm aspect ratio. I use a lot of 6x9, but in rangefinder Fuji's. I'm presuming you want technical for movements.

    However, since there is not much difference in size and weight of folding or monorail technical cameras, you may want to consider the 4X5 format, and a roll film back. That takes you up to short panoramic if you then get a 6X12 roll film back.

    You will be packing around about as much weight, so why not add to your options, for a larger and different aspect ratio. ???

    In addition, it's quite likely that you can get a very nice 4X5 technical camera for less money than a dedicated 6X9. I doubt there are as many dedicated 6X9 camera's available in the used market as there are 4X5.

    And what about film emulsions.... 220 roll film is essentially NLA and 120 may be more limited than LF films. In the worst case scenario you could shoot 4X5 film with either a mask or guidelines/crop to any format under 4X5. So buying a roll film back may NOT be an added expense.

    I have before, shot a strange panorama of 2X5 inches on a 4X5 using a DDS film holder with cut dark slides, for 4 images on 2 sheets of film. Centering the image can be done with offset lens boards, or rise/fall. A modified "sliding back" can also be an options. Using this method, a 5X7 could crank out four sheets of 6X12 on one DDS with the cut dark slide. Film availability may outstrip 120 roll film choices at some point.

    With all these considerations, every time I came close to the purchase of a technical 6X9 camera, I can't seem to pull the trigger. I guess that's why I am still shooting 6X9 in a more conventional camera without movements.

    I do my 2X5 inch (5X12) format, however, with a 4X5 and masks. I do 6X12 with a dedicated roll film back. I have a Dayi back that works great... multiformat.

    I am very frugal on my choices as a function of being now on retirement income. That sound great at this point in my life, but even going back many years, my friends and associates have always regarded me as a "cheap bastid". Always seeking workarounds or modifications to reduce expense.

    I've been very, very good however, in the hope that my Karma in the next life is to be "filthy rich" and spend money the way many others seem to do.

  6. #6

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    Re: 6x9 technical camera

    Quote Originally Posted by neil poulsen View Post
    I enjoy medium format photography, and I used a Linhof Technika IV for a few years. It's a solid camera that's built like a tank. But, if you like wide angle photos, a Technika is limited. There's the Technika Master that facilitates wide angle lenses better, but it's expensive. (If you can find one.)

    I finally decided on an old-style Arca Swiss, when one became available on EBay for a reasonable price. After some fixups, and being lucky enough to find accessories, it's an excellent camera. But, parts are hard to find. (e.g. bag bellows, especially recessed lensboards, etc.)

    I see Arca Classic F's for sale on EBay. But, that's expensive!

    How about a flat bed, like a Shen Hao? They're lightweight. Or a lightweight 4x5 with the Graflok system that accepts bag bellows? (A bit clumsy, though.)
    Neil in that direction (lightweight 4x5) there is the Plaubel Peco Jr. That's another possible option I think.

  7. #7

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    Re: 6x9 technical camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Kuzano View Post
    Not to be overlooked for a bit more panorama. 6X9 is a 3:2 ratio, so you get the benefit of a larger film format in the 35mm aspect ratio. I use a lot of 6x9, but in rangefinder Fuji's. I'm presuming you want technical for movements.

    However, since there is not much difference in size and weight of folding or monorail technical cameras, you may want to consider the 4X5 format, and a roll film back. That takes you up to short panoramic if you then get a 6X12 roll film back.

    You will be packing around about as much weight, so why not add to your options, for a larger and different aspect ratio. ???

    In addition, it's quite likely that you can get a very nice 4X5 technical camera for less money than a dedicated 6X9. I doubt there are as many dedicated 6X9 camera's available in the used market as there are 4X5.

    And what about film emulsions.... 220 roll film is essentially NLA and 120 may be more limited than LF films. In the worst case scenario you could shoot 4X5 film with either a mask or guidelines/crop to any format under 4X5. So buying a roll film back may NOT be an added expense.

    I have before, shot a strange panorama of 2X5 inches on a 4X5 using a DDS film holder with cut dark slides, for 4 images on 2 sheets of film. Centering the image can be done with offset lens boards, or rise/fall. A modified "sliding back" can also be an options. Using this method, a 5X7 could crank out four sheets of 6X12 on one DDS with the cut dark slide. Film availability may outstrip 120 roll film choices at some point.

    With all these considerations, every time I came close to the purchase of a technical 6X9 camera, I can't seem to pull the trigger. I guess that's why I am still shooting 6X9 in a more conventional camera without movements.

    I do my 2X5 inch (5X12) format, however, with a 4X5 and masks. I do 6X12 with a dedicated roll film back. I have a Dayi back that works great... multiformat.

    I am very frugal on my choices as a function of being now on retirement income. That sound great at this point in my life, but even going back many years, my friends and associates have always regarded me as a "cheap bastid". Always seeking workarounds or modifications to reduce expense.

    I've been very, very good however, in the hope that my Karma in the next life is to be "filthy rich" and spend money the way many others seem to do.
    Kuzano, I expect that film makers do not discontinue 120 roll film. Is true that is near to impossible to find 220 (I used it on my mamiya 23).
    I have never managed 4x5 film, so it seems by now a bit difficult for me to get to mask 4x5 film to get 2 exposures of 2x5. Anyway I will study that in a near future.

    I live in Spain, believe me I am far from retirement, but I have to be frugal. Crisis here is beating hard on the economy. I am just selling equipment to buy this.

    ¿By the way what camera are you using?

    Best.
    Brandán

  8. #8

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    Re: 6x9 technical camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Salomon - HP Marketing View Post
    Take a look at a Linhof TK 23 or 45S or a Master Tecnika 3000 if you want to be able to go very wide easily.
    Yes Bob the Technikardan is a great option, I will try to find any. Thanks!!!

  9. #9

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    Re: 6x9 technical camera

    Arca F Compact 6x9...

  10. #10

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    Re: 6x9 technical camera

    Quote Originally Posted by evan clarke View Post
    Arca F Compact 6x9...
    I am not sure to find any Arca Swiss below 1000eur...
    I am sure that those cameras are like gitzo tripods. You buy a lifetime piece.
    Maybe I have to stay frugal as kuzano commented.
    Thanks Neil!!!!

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