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Thread: Ansco 17

  1. #1

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    Ansco 17

    Hello ....
    I am looking for information abouti Ansco 17, film developer.
    I found little information, according to Steve Anchell (darkoroom coockbook) this developer should be used with tiime equal or similar to the D76.
    From darkroom cookbook, I can use 1 +1 or stock.
    I was wondering if in stock is considered one shoot.

    Does anyone use it? Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions? What are your experiences?

    I developed two rolls with this dev and found it very good on the high-lights, but a little weak in the shadows.

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2

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    Re: Ansco 17

    It is Ansco's developer that competes with d-76. There are differences in the formulation that make small differences in the negative possible. Supposedly, it reduces blocked up shadows as compared to d-76. I'm no chemist, so my info is empirecal.

  3. #3

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    Re: Ansco 17

    You might also like Ansco 130, which is available from photographers formulary. It does not keep well dry, but once mixed it keeps real well. It works on paper as well as film.

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    Re: Ansco 17

    Quote Originally Posted by premortho View Post
    You might also like Ansco 130, which is available from photographers formulary. It does not keep well dry, but once mixed it keeps real well. It works on paper as well as film.
    Ansco 130 is primarily a PRINT developer; D-76 and the Agfa/Ansco 17 are NEGATIVE developers. While 130 can be used for film, I don't think it's very common. Maybe premortho could elaborate on how he uses it?

    The differences between D-76 and the Ansco 17 formula are slight. Using these kinds of developers 1+1 decreased the concentration of sodium sulfite in solution and yields sharper, but slightly grainier negatives. Full-strength yields smoother grain but less acutance. While these developers can be replenished and reused (I have the Agfa/Ansco 17R replenisher formulae somewhere) most use them one-shot. I have heard of people reusing the stock solution and extending development time for the second batch. However, Kodak does not recommend this for D-76 and I don't think it would be good practice for Ansco 17 at all, since it is slightly weaker than D-76.

    You could also just mix D-76 (It's in the cookbook too).

    Best

  5. #5
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    Re: Ansco 17

    Ansco 17 / Agfa 44 is a German (Agfa) formula which was designed for fine grain, compared to D76 it gives slightly better sharpness and a touch finer grain along with slightly better film speed, perhaps not surprising as it's close to the official developer used for ASA testing. Another good variant is Adox Borax MQ.

    There's 80g/l Sodium Sulphite in Ansco 17/Agfa 44, Ansco 17M, and also Ilford ID-68/Microphen, compared to the 100g/l used in D76, this is the optimal level of sulphite to achieve the best overall balance of sharpness, film speed and excellent fine grain.

    Kodak spent about 10 or 12 years trying to improve D76 which was in fact their second fine grain developer, the first being close to what Haist suggested to Troop containing no Hydroquinone and now erroneously called D76H, in fact Kodak's D76h is a variant of D76 with different buffering. In the end all Kodak did was minor tweaking of the buffering.

    As Doremus says Ansco 130 was never meant for film use, it was called a Universal Print developer which is unusual as the term Univerasal was more typically used for developers for fast development of plates or sheet film as well as papers.

    We used Adox Borax MQ replenised at work for a number of years with consistently good results and I'd expect the same with Ansco 17/Agfa 44.

    Ian

  6. #6

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    Re: Ansco 17

    If you might be interested in the potential benefits of Ansco 130 on film, try entering it in the box at the top of the page, or google it up. Some people think the world of this developer for both film and paper. I also use, and have used since 1954 d-72 for negs as well as paper. When I started on a newspaper, it was used when in a rush before the paper hit the streets. Until the last 20 years or so, Dectol (d-72) packages called it a "Plate, Film, and Paper developer." It's very easy to control contrast with dilution.

  7. #7

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    Re: Ansco 17

    Many beautiful prints, of Salon quality, were developed in Ansco 17, before and after WWll. It did a great job on both Supreme pan film and Plenachrome, which was a high quality (Minimal Grain) Orthochromatic film. It would even tame Superpan Press.

  8. #8
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    Re: Ansco 17

    Quote Originally Posted by premortho View Post
    If you might be interested in the potential benefits of Ansco 130 on film, try entering it in the box at the top of the page, or google it up. Some people think the world of this developer for both film and paper. I also use, and have used since 1954 d-72 for negs as well as paper. When I started on a newspaper, it was used when in a rush before the paper hit the streets. Until the last 20 years or so, Dectol (d-72) packages called it a "Plate, Film, and Paper developer." It's very easy to control contrast with dilution.
    D72 was sold as a plate and film developer in the UK with no mention of papers untilquite late, that's reflected in the Kodak Ltd data books with Formulae as well. In the UK D163 was sold as the main Kodak print developer, it must have been the late 70's or early 80's that D72/Dektol began to be sold in the UK as a print developer.

    In the US D72/Dektol was recommended for both films & papers from the 1930's.

    Ian

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    Re: Ansco 17

    Ok!!!
    Thanks for yours answers!
    thanks for your answers.
    I will use the ansco17 as one-shoot, is diluted 1 +1 or as stock.

    premortho cited the WW II. Maybe I'll open another trhread, but I thought to use the ww II dev for my print, I would get a green cast from my print, a strong greencast.

  10. #10

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    Re: Ansco 17

    I have never heard of the green problem, unless you mean with prints. Neither Ansco 17 or Eastman d-76 is reccomended for paper developing. Ansco 130 is a superb paper developer, and Eastman's d-72 has worked well for me. You might try souping your negs in 17, and your prints in 130. Here is the formula I have for Ansco 17; This is a transation, or conversion from American measure to European, so may be very slightly off. Hot water (52 centigrade) 750cc, metol 1.5 grams, sodium sulfite, anhydrous 80 grams, hydroquinone 3.0 grams, borax, 3.0 grams, potassium bromide 0.5 grams, water to make 1 liter. Add and stir in the order given. Tank dev 20 centigrade, times for fine grain films, 10 to 15 minutes. For portrait sheet films 12 to 20 minutes. Tray developement time at 20 centigrade 8 to 12 minutes, depends on film type and density desired.
    Quote Originally Posted by zone View Post
    Ok!!!
    Thanks for yours answers!
    thanks for your answers.
    I will use the ansco17 as one-shoot, is diluted 1 +1 or as stock.

    premortho cited the WW II. Maybe I'll open another trhread, but I thought to use the ww II dev for my print, I would get a green cast from my print, a strong greencast.

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