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Thread: 8x10 lens identification

  1. #1

    8x10 lens identification

    I've used a 4x5 camera for over 15 years. My family is very big into Christmas giving and presents so this year we came to the last gift to be opened. It was a hug box with my name on it. I unwrapped it and inside I found a custom camera box containing a 8x10 Ansco in great shape, 3 8x10 holders and a lens!!! Needless to say, I had a VERY merry Christmas

    The only problem is that I can't tell what size the lens is. The lens is marked :

    8x10 Turner Reich Anast. F7.0 Ser II 210251 Gundlach Manufacturing Cotp. Fairport, NY

    Its mounted in a Illex #4 Acme f7 - 64 shutter.

    Can anyone give me any information about this lens or tell me how to identify it?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Harbor City, California
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    8x10 lens identification

    Your lens is a triple convertible with a combined focal length of 12". It consists of a 21" and a 28" cell. When both cells are in place, the 28" should be placed on the front unless your subject is closer to the lensboa

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Harbor City, California
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    1,748

    8x10 lens identification

    Your lens is a triple convertible with a combined focal length of 12". It consists of a 21" and a 28" cell. When both cells are in place, the 28" should be placed on the front unless your subject is closer to the lensboard than the lensboard is to the film plane. Used alone, the maximum aperture of the front cell is f16, and the rear f12.5.



    The lens was in competition with the Zeiss Protar Series VII, and had similar characteristics, but each cell had five cemented elements rather than the four of the Protar. The coverage increases considerably when stopped down. You should find considreable use of movements feasible at f22.



    Merry Christmas and may your present give you great enjoyment.

  4. #4

    8x10 lens identification

    OK, I have a little more information. Some of the markings on the barrell are smudged but I found the markings:

    EQ 12" FR. 25"

    and there are 3 fstop rings on the shutter. So I assume it is a triple convertable with 12", 25" and some other size elements. I would still appreciate hearing from anyone who has any information on this type of lens.

  5. #5

    8x10 lens identification

    Thanks. I did finally find a sticker on the box that said the lens was a 12", 19", 25". Is this a different lens than you were referring to or was it mislabeled? Also, the lens looks to be in great shape except for several small air bubbles. Will these air bubbles affect the lens qualtiy much ?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    South of Rochester, NY
    Posts
    273

    8x10 lens identification

    Your lens is most probably the 12-19-25 as marked. They seem to have been more popular (or at least survived more) than the 12-21-28's. The air bubbles won't affect it at all and back in it's day were a sign of a 'quality lens', or so they said back then... It's a great lens and if you don't have any seperation in the rear element, you're lucky and hold onto it! It works fine with both elements and acceptably with either of them used singly, but varies greatly lens to lens. I would suggest that you double-check your focus _after_ stopping down as they tend to change focus as you change arperture. Other than that, I love mine ;-)

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    1,748

    8x10 lens identification

    All an air bubble does optically is to block a trivial amount of light.

  8. #8
    wfwhitaker
    Guest

    8x10 lens identification

    I'll trade you my lump of coal!

  9. #9

    8x10 lens identification

    William, let me think about that...uh, NO

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 1999
    Posts
    769

    8x10 lens identification

    As mentioned earlier, the lens is probably the triple convertible Turner Reich. The two groups have the two longer focal lengths, when you use both cells together, you get the shortest focal length. Basic rules for using convertibles. When using each cell singly, they are best used behind the stop because the position of the stop helps to correct some aberrations. When using single cells, it is a good idea to stop down and to use a strong monochromatic filter to restrict the spectrum and reduce chromatic abberations. When the two cells are used in combination, the typical advise is to use the longer focal length cell in front. Cheers, DJ

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