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Thread: January 2012 portraits

  1. #131

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    374

    Re: January 2012 portraits

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Petronio View Post
    Got the check!

    Bump!

  2. #132

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    173

    Re: January 2012 portraits

    Quote Originally Posted by dwp View Post
    hi All,

    My first LF portrait, very happy but abit low contrast, have to push up about 15%. shot by Goerz Dogmar 150/4.5, Fuji Neopan 100, Dev D76 drum 5'15s. please help me to get better contrast?


    my daughter

    thanks,
    One of the experts who knows better than I please chime in, but here's my suggestion:

    I opened this in photoshop; the histogram is showing that the entire dynamic range is in the lower half of the image. A simple levels adjustment makes a huge difference. There's actually quite a bit of contrast already there.

    Looking at the histogram in the original image, it looks to me like you may have a suboptimal scan. I don't know what scanning software you are using, but you want to look at the histogram in the preview and try to get the settings right so that the image data fills up almost the entire horizontal width of the histogram (as a reference to what I'm talking about, your original image data only fills the left half). I try to set the software so that the darkest point in the final positive image (usually the unexposed border of the frame) is 0 and let the high values (which are actually the densest regions of the negative) fall where they may (Vuescan makes it easy to do this; Vuescan is what I use and know how to operate). Thus, since you are setting the darkest part to the film base density, you aren't losing any data in the shadows should you decide to bump them up later. For instance, your daughter's hair above her left eye, in which all detail is lost because it was probably underexposed when scanned. If the detail wasn't there in the first place due to exposure, then there's no way to get it back, but B&W film has tons of dynamic range, and I would hope that it's there on the negative. To help out with just getting a good histogram, I turn off or flatten all curves and so forth so that I get a "flat" scan. This flat scan may look boring, flat, or not how you ultimately want it, but don't worry as you will be able to fix the rest in Photoshop, and Photoshop is a much better tool than any scanning software once you have a good scan to work with (and even sometimes when you don't).

    What this procedure does is allow the scanner to capture as much dynamic range as possible into a flat scan.

    Once you have the flat scan achieved, open it in Photoshop (or other image editing app), and do a levels adjustment, and bring the right-side slider all the way down to where the right side of the image data is in the histogram, to taste (on a mac, hold down the option key to see more readily where the highlights in the image start to blow out; I don't know what the key-combination is in Photoshop on Windows). Do the same for the darks with the left-side slider (you probably won't need much darks adjustment as this scan procedure should have helped with that already).

    Now, you are ready to adjust the image further: add contrast, try to bump up the shadows with a curve, balance the color (if in color), etc etc. I wouldn't mess with the "brightness" adjustments (as you said in another post) until this phase, though if you got a good flat scan and a good levels adjustment in Photoshop, you shouldn't need to. Usually "exposure", curves, etc are a little more subtle and easier to control at this stage.

    Hope this helps.

    And by the way... great shot!

  3. #133

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Surnadal
    Posts
    126

    Re: January 2012 portraits

    Been a while since I posted here, but finally dusted off the Crown Graphic and did a little shooting yesterday.
    Met a Czech girl at an archery shoot and asked her to sit for me... she came to the studi yesterday.. did a load of digital, but got the crown out and lit with good ol Arrilights instead of studio flash.
    Bothe shot with Ektar 203mm f 7,7 wide open at 1/5 of a second. Well expired pola T55. scan from neg.
    Czech girl with czech camera
    (she moved a little in the first shot, hence the softish eyes...)



  4. #134

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    96

    Re: January 2012 portraits

    I'm (attempting) to begin a project to photograph my Ride to Conquer Cancer bike team, and as a catalyst to get my team members excited about this, I photographed myself to send them all an example of the type, and style of image I'm planning on.

    This is taken on Polaroid 804:


  5. #135

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    New Delhi India
    Posts
    72

    Re: January 2012 portraits

    I just got my first LF camera, a Sinar F2 with a Rodenstock Grandagon-N 90 mm F4.5.
    This is my wife trying to relax in front of the camera.

  6. #136

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    9,472

    Re: January 2012 portraits

    Quote Originally Posted by bomzi View Post
    I just got my first LF camera, a Sinar F2 with a Rodenstock Grandagon-N 90 mm F4.5.
    This is my wife trying to relax in front of the camera.
    Nice first shot... big hands, big heart!

  7. #137

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Uralla, NSW Australia
    Posts
    379

    Re: January 2012 portraits

    Quote Originally Posted by grahamcase View Post
    I'm (attempting) to begin a project to photograph my Ride to Conquer Cancer bike team, and as a catalyst to get my team members excited about this, I photographed myself to send them all an example of the type, and style of image I'm planning on.

    This is taken on Polaroid 804:

    Good stuff. Please post more if your team mates agree.

  8. #138
    jp's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    5,388

    Re: January 2012 portraits

    Quote Originally Posted by urs0polar View Post
    One of the experts who knows better than I please chime in, but here's my suggestion:

    I opened this in photoshop; the histogram is showing that the entire dynamic range is in the lower half of the image. A simple levels adjustment makes a huge difference. There's actually quite a bit of contrast already there.

    Looking at the histogram in the original image, it looks to me like you may have a suboptimal scan. I don't know what scanning software you are using, but you want to look at the histogram in the preview and try to get the settings right so that the image data fills up almost the entire horizontal width of the histogram (as a reference to what I'm talking about, your original image data only fills the left half). I try to set the software so that the darkest point in the final positive image (usually the unexposed border of the frame) is 0 and let the high values (which are actually the densest regions of the negative) fall where they may (Vuescan makes it easy to do this; Vuescan is what I use and know how to operate). Thus, since you are setting the darkest part to the film base density, you aren't losing any data in the shadows should you decide to bump them up later. For instance, your daughter's hair above her left eye, in which all detail is lost because it was probably underexposed when scanned. If the detail wasn't there in the first place due to exposure, then there's no way to get it back, but B&W film has tons of dynamic range, and I would hope that it's there on the negative. To help out with just getting a good histogram, I turn off or flatten all curves and so forth so that I get a "flat" scan. This flat scan may look boring, flat, or not how you ultimately want it, but don't worry as you will be able to fix the rest in Photoshop, and Photoshop is a much better tool than any scanning software once you have a good scan to work with (and even sometimes when you don't).

    What this procedure does is allow the scanner to capture as much dynamic range as possible into a flat scan.

    Once you have the flat scan achieved, open it in Photoshop (or other image editing app), and do a levels adjustment, and bring the right-side slider all the way down to where the right side of the image data is in the histogram, to taste (on a mac, hold down the option key to see more readily where the highlights in the image start to blow out; I don't know what the key-combination is in Photoshop on Windows). Do the same for the darks with the left-side slider (you probably won't need much darks adjustment as this scan procedure should have helped with that already).

    Now, you are ready to adjust the image further: add contrast, try to bump up the shadows with a curve, balance the color (if in color), etc etc. I wouldn't mess with the "brightness" adjustments (as you said in another post) until this phase, though if you got a good flat scan and a good levels adjustment in Photoshop, you shouldn't need to. Usually "exposure", curves, etc are a little more subtle and easier to control at this stage.

    Hope this helps.

    And by the way... great shot!
    I'm not an expert either but fixing this is fairly easy as has been described. The image is far to the left on the histogram, so it looks like the black wasn't set right in the pre-scanning adjustments. There would ideally be a little bit of room on either side of the image's place in the histogram.

    Once scanned like that, some adjustment of curves is usually needed to bring the distribution of tones in the scene to where they should be in the image. See my attachments. I used curves to move the white end of the curve to a little bit right of the brightest thing in the photo (the chair). Then I raised up the blackest part a little bit to compensate for black being too black in the scan and losing some of the hair detail. Then a little bit of curve was put in to put some steepness in the darkest parts, flatten out a little, so we can maintain the normal steepness through the light grays (shirt texture). Wherever the curve is steep is where you boost contrast.

  9. #139

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    48

    Re: January 2012 portraits

    No, @dwp, he meant that you please help him make a better contrast negative, not a digital one. . I think so!

  10. #140

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    48

    Re: January 2012 portraits

    @dwp: you should develop the film at less time.

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