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Thread: Lens hoods advice

  1. #41
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    Re: Lens hoods advice

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    Yes, that's the exact one I avoid using at times. Mine is the older type that clips on, rather than flips up. Maybe a flip-up would be a better option but I don't have noticable problem just using rubber screw-in shades for portariture in a studio environment.

    The flip-up one clips on, too, at least mine does. But the flipping is no real advantage. It will fall down when you least expect it to, and being flipped up inhibits rather than enhancing access to the shutter controls. But it unclips very easily. The Sinar quickie shade is easier--there is only the one post down low, and it does not impede access to the shutter controls from the sides and top.

    Rick "easier than screwing a shade onto the lens" Denney

  2. #42
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    Re: Lens hoods advice

    One thing to add that hasn't been mentioned. If you have clipped corners on the ground glass, you can see when the shade vignettes--if you see the inside of the shade and not the distant landscape when looking through the corner, then the shade will cause vignetting. I always adjusted a shade so that it just avoided being visible through those trimmed corners.

    It may not work for really short lenses--the sighting angle on my Sinar is occluded by the ground-glass frame itself. But it works for longer lenses--90 and up.

    Rick "noting this should be done at taking aperture" Denney

  3. #43
    Land-Scapegrace Heroique's Avatar
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    Re: Lens hoods advice

    Quote Originally Posted by rdenney View Post
    ...if you see the inside of the shade and not the distant landscape when looking through the corner...
    When checking corners, I have never been able to see “the distant landscape,” but I think we do see what you mean. ;^)

  4. #44

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    Re: Lens hoods advice

    Did anyone ever help the original poster or did they just pontificate and play a competitive king-of-the-nerds contest? Thank goodness GPS got called out of the country or we'd still be going.

    MWitmann: in the field, get a couple $10 wide-angle metal lenshades that screw-in and supplement the shading with physical blockage - darkslide, hat, your body.

    In a more controlled environment (or at least not windy) use a compendium shade designed for your camera. Linhof, Sinar, Toyo, Arca Swiss, etc. all make elaborate shading and masking systems (but they can be expensive).

    If you can afford it, the Lee system is nice. So are adaptations of the Mamiya and Linedehal bellows shades.

  5. #45
    Lachlan 717
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    Re: Lens hoods advice

    Cokin also has a good filter/hood system (X-Pro). However, it too suffers the Lee issue of needing an adaptor ring.

    Pretty handy thing for use with or without filters.
    Lachlan.

    You miss 100% of the shots you never take. -- Wayne Gretzky

  6. #46

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    Re: Lens hoods advice

    Remember that not getting the shot because you are dicking around with the shade is the lowest contrast image of all ;-p

    Here is an old set-up using a beater Hasselblad shade set upside down so the arms wouldn't hit the camera. A cheap compromise that was still sturdy, fast, and effective for most situations. You could knob out the shade while looking through the ground glass and it wasn't prone to getting knocked around by the wind too much. Probably not ideal with a larger lensboard (like a big monorail) or shallow, wide-angle lenses.

  7. #47
    Analog Photographer Kimberly Anderson's Avatar
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    Re: Lens hoods advice

    Here's a vote of confidence for the Lee filter system. I was video-taping a live nativity tonight with my D7000 and Lee compendium shade, and the big camel decided it looked like his grain bowl. He had it in his teeth and I had to pry it out. The lens shade is none the worse for wear...albeit a little slobbery.

  8. #48

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    Re: Lens hoods advice

    Quote Originally Posted by rdenney View Post
    The shade on the left is more effective, for two reasons. One is that it is longer, which requires it to be wider as well. The second is because it is (mostly) square rather than round. Both shades are tight and will vignette when using a filter.
    One benefit you appear to get from the one on the right is no reflection from oblique rays hitting the interior surface of the shade. The one on the left you would want to have some damn good antireflection coating, but we know these are often not manufactured to such rigorous standards.

    Also, the discussion pertaining to the ideal placement of the opening is akin to how many angels can dance on the head of a pin - the risk from incorrect placement is vignetting. What's the risk from the flare delta? I have enough trouble seeing the edge of the frame on a ground glass. Do you have some technique for adjusting to eliminate the risk?

  9. #49
    Joanna Carter's Avatar
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    Re: Lens hoods advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Michael View Post
    … the risk from incorrect placement is vignetting. What's the risk from the flare delta? I have enough trouble seeing the edge of the frame on a ground glass. Do you have some technique for adjusting to eliminate the risk?
    Yes, as has been mentioned, that is what the cut corners on the GG screen are for. Simply peer through each corner towards the stopped down iris on the lens;if you see anything other than a full bright circle, you are getting vignetting. Adjust the hood so that you can see that full bright circle.
    Joanna Carter
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  10. #50
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    Re: Lens hoods advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Joanna Carter View Post
    Yes, as has been mentioned, that is what the cut corners on the GG screen are for. Simply peer through each corner towards the stopped down iris on the lens;if you see anything other than a full bright circle, you are getting vignetting. Adjust the hood so that you can see that full bright circle.
    Yes. That's why I came back and described that. It works quickly and precisely for lenses long enough that you can actually see the aperture through the opening in the corner.

    Rick "who only goes to such trouble when time is not an issue" Denney

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