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Thread: Paper negatives

  1. #711

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    46

    Re: Paper negatives

    I'm shooting a lot of Multigrade IV RC Deluxe - I rate it at ISO4 and it's doing ok. As someone else mentioned, paper is good for low contrast scenes - 3 or 3 1/2 stops the way I shoot it.

    I'm preflashing by laying the paper on the floor, holding a keychain LED flashlight against the ceiling and lighting it for a sec. If I immediately developed the paper at that point, it'd look white. If I flashlight it for 2 seconds, it starts developing as super light grey - that's how I know 1 second is enough (learned through trials on small sheets of paper and developing).

    I tray develop in the evenings in my bathroom with a headlamp that has red LEDs. About 40-100 seconds in Ilford Paper Developer does the trick for me. I dilute at 1+12.

  2. #712
    Nana Dadzie Ghansah ndg's Avatar
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    Apr 2011
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    Re: Paper negatives

    "The Museum"
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Shot on Arista Edu RC VC Glossy 11x14
    Lens - Voigtlander Euryscop Series II, No 7 at f5.6
    Developer - Eco Pro B&W paper developer in Jobo

  3. #713

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    Re: Paper negatives

    Paper is not red sensitive. You will need more exposure under tungsten inside or outside both early and late in the day and probably winter and further from the equator. With X ray film I recently made some tungsten shots that came out great with THREE stops more exposure than meter, bellows, reciprocity called for.

  4. #714

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    Re: Paper negatives

    XRay is also red blind.

  5. #715

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    Jun 2015
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    Anglesey, North Wales, UK
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    Re: Paper negatives

    Quote Originally Posted by ndg View Post
    B&W paper developer in Jobo
    Please could you clarify details.
    In my post (705) I queried the use of a Jobo tank and sheet film holder to process the paper negatives.
    At the time I wondered about the amount of liquid required versus that recommended for films;
    Subsequently I have wondered about the processing times.
    Any info most welcome
    regards
    Tony

  6. #716
    Nana Dadzie Ghansah ndg's Avatar
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    Re: Paper negatives

    Hi Tony! I use the Jobo system extensively - paper, Xray and traditional film. I've even used it for ortho-lith film
    I use the same volumes I use for film when developing paper. Using a rough estimate of 4cc of developer per 80 sq in (8x10) surface, I mix the developer with water to get a ratio of 1:100.
    Using the 11x14 as an example, the surface is 154 sq in, so about 2x the surface of an 8x10. That means 8 cc of developer.
    I use the Jobo 2840 tank. For an 1:100 ratio, I mix it with with water to get a volume of 800 cc.
    I prewash for 1 min
    Develop for 6 min
    Stop for 1 min
    Wash with water for 1min
    Fix for 4 -6 mon (depending on fixer) and then wash.
    Temp is roughly 68 deg F
    Hope this helps


    Quote Originally Posted by tonyowen View Post
    Please could you clarify details.
    In my post (705) I queried the use of a Jobo tank and sheet film holder to process the paper negatives.
    At the time I wondered about the amount of liquid required versus that recommended for films;
    Subsequently I have wondered about the processing times.
    Any info most welcome
    regards
    Tony

  7. #717
    JoeV's Avatar
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    Oct 2006
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    Albuquerque, NM, USA
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    Re: Paper negatives

    I use a Jobo test print tank. I'm currently on the road, don't know the model number, but it holds two 4"-by-5" prints along the inside periphery. I use about 100mL of chemistry, rotating the tank on its side for 3 minutes. Ilford Universal paper or PQ concentrate, diluted 1+10 or 1+15, seems to work fine. You can also use dilm developers, but will have to figure out your own dilutions and times. Experimentation is in order with paper negatives, since these weren't originally intended as an in-camera film.

    I like to use grade 2 RC paper, rated at ISO12. Freestyle Photo's Arista brand.

    ~Joe
    The photograph and the thing being photographed are not the same thing.

  8. #718

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Portland, OR
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    619

    Re: Paper negatives

    I really want to post this in the 'soft landscapes' thread. but this is where it truly belongs.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Lake Colden, Morning

    An overexposed paper neg. brovaria paper? maybe ilford MGIV
    Tachihara 4x5 and 90mm super angulon
    notes say 16min exposure
    ~nicholas
    lifeofstawa
    stawastawa at gmail

  9. #719

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    Jun 2015
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    Anglesey, North Wales, UK
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    Re: Paper negatives

    First try at paper negatives.
    Calumet CC401 with 135mm f4.7 xenar
    Three paper negatives plus ‘photoshopped’ positives attached.
    Multigrade IV RC de Luxe paper rated at ISO 3/6
    Reflected exposure with Weston Master V gave 13.5 and 13 values
    Exposures were either - 1/2 second @ f22 or 2s @f32
    Developed in Jobo tank with 2509n insert and PQ Universal continuous slow rotation.
    Development time 1m 30s.
    Used PS to invert image and used the Brightness/Contrast and Shadow/Highlight adjustments
    Comments please as I’m not certain exactly what I may be doing right or wrong.
    Regards
    Tony
    Attachment 150128Attachment 150129
    Attachment 150130Attachment 150131

  10. #720

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Lower Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    86

    Re: Paper negatives

    G'day Tony, seems to me you've got a lot going on; images are quite blurry, negs seem to show light leaks, negs are under exposed and contrast is too high.

    Perhaps your concentrating too much on taking technique and processing issues.

    I'd suggest go back to basics, remember the KISS principal, pre-flash and or use a yellow filter, avoid harsh lighting situations at first and test expose at 1.5, 3, 6, 12 ISO.

    Below is an Ilford Multigrade resin coated neg exposed in a sliding box simple lens camera, neg was pre-flashed and exposed for 2 seconds through a Y2 filter. Neg processed in ordinary Ilford paper developer at normal dilution.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Same neg inverted in PS.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Same inverted image with levels adjusted in PS to better illustrate how I would contact print this neg in the darkroom.
    Click image for larger version. 

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