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Thread: LF definition?

  1. #1

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    LF definition?

    as the headline implies, I would like to hear whether there is a definition on what constitutes as large format ?

    I have been told (but I have often been told wrong...) that all sizes bigger than negatives larger (wider) than an 120 film is LF...

    I don't know.
    Is 6x17 then not LF?

    is the classic polaroid 3.25 x 4.25" (ex in pol 665) LF?

    I have seen an old reprint of a sales brochure on cameras. Here all sizes up to 8x10 was called small format (!!) - from 10x12 to 20x24 "medium format" (!!!) and above that LF....

    Does the "definition" change over time?

  2. #2

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    Re: LF definition?

    This discussion has been had. At this site, the definition has more to do with the type of camera used than the size of the format. I think this site could more accurately be called the View Camera Forum, but maybe that was taken?

  3. #3

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    Re: LF definition?

    Yes it did really change over time!
    Vor example around 1900 there was almost all what was smaller then 8x10 amateurisch format in Switzerland, later up from 40is to around the 80is all smaller the 5x7/13x18cm was amateurisch from the 80is the started to accept 4x5 as pro format, because film got always better and better and the lenses also!

    Cheers Armin

  4. #4

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    Re: LF definition?

    Quote Originally Posted by Armin Seeholzer View Post
    Yes it did really change over time!
    Vor example around 1900 there was almost all what was smaller then 8x10 amateurisch format in Switzerland, later up from 40is to around the 80is all smaller the 5x7/13x18cm was amateurisch from the 80is the started to accept 4x5 as pro format, because film got always better and better and the lenses also!

    Cheers Armin
    At that historical rate, we are due to accept 120 film as large format in 10 more years.

  5. #5

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    Re: LF definition?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Dahlgren View Post
    At that historical rate, we are due to accept 120 film as large format in 10 more years.
    maybe in 10 years the 35mm film has dissapeared, so ther will be only "any format"...

  6. #6

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    Re: LF definition?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay DeFehr View Post
    This discussion has been had. At this site, the definition has more to do with the type of camera used than the size of the format. I think this site could more accurately be called the View Camera Forum, but maybe that was taken?
    so what is the definition on Wiew camera?

  7. #7
    Format Omnivore Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    Re: LF definition?

    Quote Originally Posted by gandolfi View Post
    so what is the definition on Wiew camera?
    If it kind of looks like an accordian or concertina, takes film at one end and a lens at the other, and requires incessant fiddling, then it's probably a view camera.

  8. #8

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    Re: LF definition?

    Why do I get the impression it's April 1?

  9. #9
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    Re: LF definition?

    This is the definition that was taught in photo school in 1948:

    If the camera uses 35mm roll film, it is considered to be small format.

    If the camera uses 120 (220) roll film, it is considered to be medium format

    If the camera uses individual sheets of film in film holders, it is considered to be large format.

    Larger than 8x10 is considered to be ultra large format.

    120 (220) roll film backs can be adapted to be used on large format cameras. The cameras are still considered to be a large format, however even sizes up to 6X17 are considered to be medium format since they are made on 120 roll film.

    A view camera allows the user to compose and focus on a ground glass at the back of the camera, while viewing directly through the lens. Then a film holder is placed in the same plane as the ground glass, and the exposure is made.

  10. #10
    Cordless Bungee Jumper Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Re: LF definition?

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian C. Miller View Post
    If it kind of looks like an accordian or concertina, takes film at one end and a lens at the other, and requires incessant fiddling, then it's probably a view camera.
    So that would rule out Speed Graphics, Crown Graphics, Graflexes of any size, even 5"x7" or larger? What about the early cameras that had boxes that were focused by moving one box in and out of another box?

    Steve
    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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