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Thread: Development time for new Tmax100 film

  1. #1

    Development time for new Tmax100 film

    Does any one know the development time for the new Tmax100 film with rotary-tube processing, for N-1, N and N+1, and D76 1:1? The Kodak Technical Publication do es'nt mention this new adjusments for D76 1:1 with rotary drums. I had a hard ti me searching for Mr. Sexton's developing times for the old TMax, and now that I finally found it, this film is discontinued and we must make adjusment for the n ew one.

    Thanks in advance,

    Jorge Prat

  2. #2

    Development time for new Tmax100 film

    I haven't yet come across the new TMAX in the wild yet. Kodak's technical publications have some details that might answer your questions.

    "Old" TMAX (called KODAK T-MAX Professional) http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/f32/f32Co ntents.shtml

    "New" TMAX (called KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX) http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/f4016/f40 16.jhtml

    In general, the development times are less for the new T-MAX in comparison to the old T-MAX.

  3. #3
    the Docter is in Arne Croell's Avatar
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    Development time for new Tmax100 film

    Wrt Dans remark: From the way Kodak wrote the statement I would assume the following: They did not change the formulation of the light sensitive emulsion. What they did change is the protective gelatine coating on top, which does not contain any silver halide crystals, to achieve the advertised antistatic behavior etc. That could influence diffusion times for developer into and reaction products out of the film.

  4. #4

    Development time for new Tmax100 film

    Who says they didn't change the emulsions?

    Kodak is now including the new recommended film developing times for the films that have moved to the new manufacturing facility. It is also interesting that the TMAX-100 times have decreased, while the new Plus-X has increased. TMAX-400 times did not change. No times were included for the new version of Tri-X. Here are a few examples for D76 (1:1) in small tanks at 72F: T-MAX 100 Professional 10 min. PROFESSIONAL T-MAX 100 7 1/2 min. (new version)

    PLUS-X Pan Professional 6 min. PROFESSIONAL PLUS-X 125 7 1/4 min. (new version)

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/j78/j78.j html

    As always, if the above web reference has embedded spaces added by the forum software, you will need to remove them.

  5. #5

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    Development time for new Tmax100 film

    get real. Kodak changes its production facilities, ostensibly improves the process, improves the materials, and hopefully improves our chances for optimized results, and you wouldn't expect some change? and you think this is one more Kodak conspiracy to derail your photography? I extend my thanks to Kodak for taking the time to tabulate the densitometry results or their best guesses. my processing times are far removed from Kodak's recommendations so this is not a real issue for me. anyone tried mixing their own emulsions lately? give Kodak credit for their efforts in what must be a very tenuous market.

    in a more general vein, review your question and understand the myriad parameters affecting your results, and how the very best advice is to expend the efforts and minimal costs to derive your own, and quite personal, processing specifications.

  6. #6

    Development time for new Tmax100 film

    I do not think that the new film "is one more Kodak conspiracy to derail your photography.? However, I do think it is an attempt by Kodak to cut costs and keep the company and the jobs of its employees from disappearing. That being said, just because the emulsion changes, does not mean it is for the worse; it might actually be better (but I am not holding my breath on that one).

    The main point was to note that TMX-100 development times (recommended by Kodak) are now 15% shorter, Plus-X times are 20% longer, and TMAX-400 times are unchanged. This seems to diffuse the theory that the only change that Kodak made "is the protective gelatin coating on top." However, we shall have to wait for a more thorough analysis once people start using the new films.

  7. #7

    Development time for new Tmax100 film

    Correction to the above post: PROFESSIONAL T-MAX 100 (new version) development times recommended by Kodak for D-76 1:1 @72F in small tanks are 25% shorter (not 15% shorter).

  8. #8

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    Development time for new Tmax100 film

    Thought you might be interested in what I learned yesterday from Kodak. 100TMAX (the new name) has been produced for cut sheet 4x5 film but has not been cut into that size yet. No new 100TMAX for readyloads has been produced yet. Obviously then, nothing is on the shelves at the Kodak warehouse (he checked). The quess is that the new material will be in stores at the end of the Summer, but once in the Kodak warehouse, could be special ordered. Their goal is to use up all of the old stock first.

    Their advice for large format folks is to retest with the new film if you really want to be sure. Or you could try their guesses at change in development times. Personally I will retest and look forward to the new film with its new production features and Kodak happy that it can continue producing it in a state of the art facility and make a profit.

    Scott

  9. #9

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    Development time for new Tmax100 film

    god forbid, that Ilford updates its product, makes adjustments, and attempts to further optimize its process and strive to improve profitability. and then have the nerve to inform us of any perceptual or procedural observations and differences? outrageous!

    '57 Chevy door slams, fins and all zoom off into the sunset trailing the sounds of the Everly Brothers. Dan pulls into the 'Flying A' gas station and six mechanics attend to his tank, tires, and windshield. Dan thinks about a photograph here, but his ISO-6 film would surely fail him and his lens in this light, so in a cloud of dust he continues down Route 66, waiting for those RCA tubes to once again glow, filled with memories and dreams of better days when she was there beside him still. sixty more miles and the static should fade ...

  10. #10

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    Development time for new Tmax100 film

    The most positive thing about the "New" Kodak fikms is their committment to those of use dedicated to the use of film by oopening a new facility to produce film. This should help dispell some of the talk about the imminent death of film. JIm

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