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Thread: using paper negs

  1. #1

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    using paper negs

    Hi
    I am fairly new to LF and I have never used paper negs as a way of taking a picture, do you just load it as you would a normal neg, is there anything, I should do to make it turn out successful, I was thinking of using 5x7 Tetenal TT Vario RC?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Big Negs Rock!
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    Re: using paper negs

    Expose correctly? ;-)
    Mark Woods

    Large Format B&W
    Cinematography Mentor at the American Film Institute
    Past President of the Pasadena Society of Artists
    Director of Photography
    Pasadena, CA
    www.markwoods.com

  3. #3

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    Re: using paper negs

    exploit the variable contrast of the paper -- by using lower contrast filters (0-1) to overcome the ortho look and contrasty nature of printing paper

  4. #4
    multi format
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    Re: using paper negs

    be aware that your light meter may give you a false reading.
    paper is sensitive to blue light and unless you use a blue filte
    (sorry i dont know which blue ) your reading may be off.
    also be aware that all paper isn't iso 6
    some is slower and some is faster.

  5. #5

    Re: using paper negs

    I use Ilford multigrade with a pearl finish, this is what ilford recomend..as there is no water mark on the paper.. I expose as 4asa. then use the sunny 16 rule, and develop in a dilute paper developer at the moment its fotospeed, and with the development, I time it till the first full image appears and make this a quarter of the time e.g.if it takes 1min to appear. then full development would be 4 mins. have a look at Jim Galli's page for developing ortho film..it also applys to paper negs

    regards
    bob

  6. #6

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    Re: using paper negs

    Quote Originally Posted by robert j fallis View Post
    I use Ilford multigrade with a pearl finish, this is what ilford recomend..as there is no water mark on the paper.. I expose as 4asa. then use the sunny 16 rule, and develop in a dilute paper developer at the moment its fotospeed, and with the development, I time it till the first full image appears and make this a quarter of the time e.g.if it takes 1min to appear. then full development would be 4 mins. have a look at Jim Galli's page for developing ortho film..it also applys to paper negs

    regards
    bob
    Thanks Robert

    I exposed it at 10iso, I will develop and let you know how it went.

    Regards

  7. #7
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    Re: using paper negs

    you might consider using "experienced" or older paper
    the fog will cut down on your excessive contrast,
    and spent/oxidized/used developer
    will control your contrast as well.

  8. #8
    JoeV's Avatar
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    Re: using paper negs

    When I use paper for prints, I've not watched the developer bath temperature as closely as one would for film. With paper negatives I've found more consistent results with maintaining bath temp around 68f, or whatever temp you calibrated your process at. And also being consistent with developer freshness and dilution helps with paper negatives, too. You're trying to hit the narrow band of continuous-tonal range between its two extremes, so this demands repeatable, consistent processing.

    I haven't used filters with VC paper, but rather use grade 2 RC paper, from Freestyle (one of the few places I can find graded RC paper). I preflash the graded paper to yield a light gray tone to an otherwise unexposed sheet; it helps to control excess contrast in daylight conditions.

    I rate the RC-2 paper at an exposure index of 12, provided the developer (Ilford Universal paper developer) is mixed 1:15 at 68f.

    Glossy paper seems to contact print pretty nicely. I think it's a valid photographic medium, rather than a mere cheap alternative to sheet film. Its ortho-like tonal range is rather 19th century in appearance, somewhat like salted paper (which I suppose paper negatives are, modern-day, factory-coated Kalitypes).

    Have fun and post some images.

    ~Joe

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