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Thread: Color photography with black and white film

  1. #11

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    Re: Color photography with black and white film

    Quote Originally Posted by Eirik Berger View Post
    That was really cool!
    Are the 25A, 58 and 47B-filters the optimal combination?
    These three filters are used for color separation so I knew they would work best. At first I tried 25A, X1 and 80A filters but my yellows were very washed out. The 80A doesn't filter enough red and green. I haven't tried the 25A, X1 and 47B but it might work well enough.

  2. #12
    Eirik Berger's Avatar
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    Re: Color photography with black and white film

    Looking in my filtercase (Hitech), I see that I have a red 25, green 58 and a blue 47 (not 47B). But after some quick googleing I think the plain 47 will work well too. I have never used the blue and green filters before, they just came along with I bought the filters a few years ago.

    If just the snow could melt away so I can find some color to separate…

    Quote Originally Posted by Incoherent Fool View Post
    These three filters are used for color separation so I knew they would work best. At first I tried 25A, X1 and 80A filters but my yellows were very washed out. The 80A doesn't filter enough red and green. I haven't tried the 25A, X1 and 47B but it might work well enough.
    Best regards,
    Eirik Berger

  3. #13

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    Re: Color photography with black and white film

    Have you tried the stronger tricolor filters: 29-61-47?

  4. #14
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
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    Re: Color photography with black and white film

    Silly question - how do you all differentiate which sheet is which color? Trial and error later, or are you marking them some how?

  5. #15

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    Re: Color photography with black and white film

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Lee View Post
    The Technicolor process involved something quite similar - except that the Technicolor camera took all 3 exposures at the same time, by the use of semi-transparent mirrors. As a result, it was possible to control colors quite nicely, and Technicolor used very rich colors when producing their final blend.

    Technicolor required a special camera, special operator, and special consultants. It was a bit like having an old IBM mainframe computer at your company with its required staff of engineers in blue suits: there was a certain "overhead" to doing business.

    Kodak came along and invented a film that had 3 dyes embedded in it, which required no special camera and operators, consultants, etc. This allowed average people to shoot color movies, and lowered the cost to studios. The color was "just as good" - not. Soon, Technicolor was used only for high-end movies, and by the 1970's, it basically disappeared. As I recall, one of the Godfather movies was the last one ever made in Technicolor. (I may be wrong)

    Because Technicolor was shot in b&w film, it is much more archival than modern color film, which fades over time. We can restore Technicolor films fairly easily. It's a "digital" process, after all.

    Technicolor was only shot with the 3-strip b/w camera up thru the early 1950's. The Eastman Color negative then became the film of choice because of its simplicity in shooting. Technicolor continued to make prints using their dye-transfer process by making b/w separation matrix from the camera color negative film. The Godfather was the last Technicolor print before the revival but it was shot on Eastman Color Negative film, just the Technicolor print process was used for the release prints. Technicolor in the 1980s? or early 1990's briefly revived the Technicolor print process, but the expense of making the b/w separations and the printing process was too costly for most film productions, and Kodak improved their release print stock making it more resistant to fade, so Technicolor stopped their print-making process again, but the Technicolor lab remains as a processing and printing lab for Kodak films.

  6. #16

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    Re: Color photography with black and white film

    One of the Life photo book series included several shots of a photographer using a special camera to take a photo of Roy Rogers; the camera exposed three sheets of B&W film at one time with filters built in. This process was fairly common in the first half of the 20th Century,

  7. #17
    Joanna Carter's Avatar
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    Re: Color photography with black and white film

    Quote Originally Posted by Eirik Berger View Post
    ... I see that I have a red 25, green 58 and a blue 47 (not 47B).
    Those are certainly the colours that Henri Gaud uses.

    To translate another part of his article on tests that he did, he recommends allowing the following ISO ratings for the three exposures, assuming you are using 100 ISO film

    Red : 32 ISO
    Green : 20 ISO
    Blue : 20 ISO

    Henri was kind enough to send me a set of Lee filters for trichromie and I have just got around to mounting them in holders and have started to play with a digital camera before burning some proper B&W film.

  8. #18
    Richard M. Coda
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    Re: Color photography with black and white film

    Quick (dumb?) question. Are there any special processing differences for each color? (For example, do you have to do red at N+1 and green/blue at N-1?)
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  9. #19
    Joanna Carter's Avatar
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    Re: Color photography with black and white film

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard M. Coda View Post
    Quick (dumb?) question. Are there any special processing differences for each color? (For example, do you have to do red at N+1 and green/blue at N-1?)
    No, treat all the films the same - N development. Don't forget, although the "effective speed" of each colour is a lot less, you are "adding" three exposures together to make the final print. Any area of white will be the sum of the "1/3" red, "1/3" green and "1/3" blue.

  10. #20

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    Re: Color photography with black and white film

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Marshall View Post
    Have you tried the stronger tricolor filters: 29-61-47?
    No, but they would probably work. Maybe even better than the ones I've used.

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