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Thread: developing 8x10, with out a darkroom?

  1. #1
    3d Visual Effects artist
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    developing 8x10, with out a darkroom?

    I'm going to be trying some 8x10 to see how I like it. I don't have a dark room, and I have no possibility of making one (very limited space, and I'd rather not go that route anyway).

    I know one option is sending off the film to be developed, but I kinda like doing it myself, and it's probably cheaper.

    The way I started out developing my 4x5, was I would stuff a negative curled up into a daylight tank (meant for a few reels of 135, or 120) and filled up the tank, and did standing, or inverting developing (ended up inverting most of the time)

    So, could I do the same thing with an 8x10, if i could find a tank large enough? (maybe a tank meant for developing prints?). I'm guessing that since such a large volume of chemical would be needed, it would probably be more economical to use a thinner mixture, and just let it stand for a longer time (rather than a stronger mixture, and trying to invert)

    At any rate, if I do enjoy shooting and processing the 8x10, it would probably not become my main medium, since 4x5 gives me the resolution and capabilities I need when scanning. I would reserve the 8x10 for subjects when I would like a larger negative, for keepsake mostly. So, whatever developing method i come up with, wouldn't have to be used very often, and wouldn't have to be super efficient.

    Any thoughts on that? I think my changing tent is large enough to load and unload 8x10 film, but I could pick up a larger tent if I needed to.
    Daniel Buck - 3d VFX artist
    3d work: DanielBuck.net
    photography: 404Photography.net - BuckshotsBlog.com

  2. #2
    Resident Heretic Bruce Watson's Avatar
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    Re: developing 8x10, with out a darkroom?

    Jobo 3005 Expert Drum with a Jobo roller base. You can load the drum in your changing tent. Daylight process film anywhere you've got a flat and level 1x2 foot space. The reason to use a Jobo tank is even development. You can really see it in clear skies for example.

    Bruce Watson

  3. #3

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    Re: developing 8x10, with out a darkroom?

    1) Closet etc for loading film loaders and tanks

    2) Jobo or other print tanks

    3) Unicolor or similar print tank roller

    Thats about it.

  4. #4
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: developing 8x10, with out a darkroom?

    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...ight=8x10+Jobo

    The above thread should help you...plus there are a ton of more threads if you do a search for "Jobo" and "8x10.

    It is very doable.

    Vaughn

  5. #5
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    Re: developing 8x10, with out a darkroom?

    Can it be done with out a roller? Would a longer period of stand developing work ok? Or would that promote noticeably uneven developing? Is a roller nessisary? I've never done anything with a roller. I've had no problems with invert developing with my 4x5's (either with the empty tank method, or with the Jobo and reels), if possible I'd like to keep the same methods for the 8x10, instead of getting more equipment (like rollers?) Unless the results are not going to be good on an 8x10 without a roller.

    The 3005, how does it load, do you just stuff the 8x10 in there curled up, like i used to do with my 4x5s? (only, probably one at a time with 8x10 I imagine?)

    Daniel Buck - 3d VFX artist
    3d work: DanielBuck.net
    photography: 404Photography.net - BuckshotsBlog.com

  6. #6

    Cool Re: developing 8x10, with out a darkroom?

    At one time I developed 8x10 film in trays in my bathtub, kneeling over the edge. I also developed it in ss tanks with hangers, each tank holding a gallon. Printing is easier with a print frame and contact paper, ie. Bergger or AZO because they are not so light sensitive.

    That should give you a feel for 8x10. At my age I don't do the kneeling bit anymore, plus I built a darkroom.

    You might want to look at 5x7. It gives a wonderful look in the gg and is a lot easier to work with. Problem with 5x7 is that you will eventually have an enlarger.

    Paula Chamlee was contact printing some 2 1/4 square stuff not too long ago, so contact prints are certainly worthwile.

  7. #7

    Re: developing 8x10, with out a darkroom?

    If 8x10 is purely an occasional thing for you, and you really don't want to go to the effort of blacking out a bathroom and using your tub, just send the sheets out for development. You could process a good amount of film for the cost of a 3005 drum, and that's not counting the foot pump or the roller base.

  8. #8
    3d Visual Effects artist
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    Re: developing 8x10, with out a darkroom?

    Would it be worth picking up a daylight print tube, and trying stand developing? I may give it a try just to see for myself. I could pick up an "Extension Module" for my current Jobo tank.
    Daniel Buck - 3d VFX artist
    3d work: DanielBuck.net
    photography: 404Photography.net - BuckshotsBlog.com

  9. #9

    Re: developing 8x10, with out a darkroom?

    Sure it'd be worth a try. People have reported issues on and off with the JOBO print drums, with various claimed fixes. Filling it up and standing it would solve all of those.

    Dunno if bromide drag would be an issue. Uneven development in even-textured areas seems likely, but it's just hours of your time and $3 in film, right?

  10. #10
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    Re: developing 8x10, with out a darkroom?

    Quote Originally Posted by John O'Connell View Post
    Sure it'd be worth a try. People have reported issues on and off with the JOBO print drums, with various claimed fixes. Filling it up and standing it would solve all of those.

    Dunno if bromide drag would be an issue. Uneven development in even-textured areas seems likely, but it's just hours of your time and $3 in film, right?
    Yea, it wouldn't take to much time and money to give it a shot, but if it's already general knowledge that it won't work, then I'd rather not waste my time I think I'll give it a shot once I've converted my cambo to 8x10.

    I should probably start another thread on this (or at least look around first) but I'm using HC110 to develop, I wonder what a good "standing" mixture would be? For my inverting mixture, I already run it a bit thin, 31:1000 from the bottle (not the syringe). For my previous standing tests, I've used the same mixture, just let it stand for longer than I would usually give it for inversion. I wonder how thin I could take the HC110, to fill a larger tube with out using to much more developer?
    Daniel Buck - 3d VFX artist
    3d work: DanielBuck.net
    photography: 404Photography.net - BuckshotsBlog.com

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