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Thread: Here we go, Century 8x10 Restoration

  1. #11
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    In the days before glue....

    This thing was 'repaired' many years ago with some small tacks. No glue at all!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails nails.jpg  

  2. #12
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    Re-gluing existing pieces

    I still could not find the corect size lumber from the local hobby shop, so I will try to order the small cherry timber directly from Midwest Supply.

    In the mean time I re-glued the areas where I still had the original pieces. I used epoxy and made a 1/16 inch shim with some basswood covered with wax paper to keep the slot open. In fact I wanted epoxy to get into the slot and re-form the correct dimensions. Even though I had the major chunks of wood, there were still smaller pieces missing from inside the slot.

    This picture was taken AFTER it was set. I held finger pressure for about an hour just to be shure it wouldn't shift after releasing it. (30 min set epoxy).
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  3. #13
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    Re: Here we go, Century 8x10 Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    I wonder if you would need to pin (dowel?) the new lumber on for strength?

    I woodworking skills are about limited to hammering like lightning (I rarely hit the same place twice).

    Vaughn
    It would be possible with a 1/16 inch dowel (toothpick perhaps?). I'll see how the glue works and if I have to re-do it, I'll consider pinning it.

  4. #14
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    Re: Here we go, Century 8x10 Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kasaian View Post
    local high school and talk with the woodworking teacher.
    If I can remember my High School experience it seemed lucky to get within one quarter of an inch. Maybe they have computer that CNC machines now. But I really don't think they could reproduce this piece.

    The mortise and tenon joints holding this thing together have upper and lower fingers that are only 4/64 of an inch. It really made me think that in the 'plastic age' we don't have precision crafted wooden items any more. In fact, I was hard pressed to find any wood object in my home crafted with the same precision. Perhaps a 3 grand classical guitar. But even in that case the sawing of the fret slots is really the most critical in terms of measuring accuracy.

  5. #15
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    Re: Here we go, Century 8x10 Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    It really made me think that in the 'plastic age' we don't have precision crafted wooden items any more.
    I am cleaning and re-glueing a bunch of century-old half-plate glass plate holders (for glass plates 4.25"x6.5", not sure if that is half plate of not). I marval at their simple, but precise (accurate?) construction.

    Vaughn

  6. #16
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    Re: Here we go, Century 8x10 Restoration

    FINISH on the WOOD

    Here is what I have figured out so far on the wood finish. The upper part of the camera confirms to be Mahogany and it appears to be un-stained. The grain is filled with some grain filler. The finish seems compatible with nitrocellulose lacquer (this does not say much because I think shellac and varnish are both compatible with the lacquer).

    The base is cherry and it IS stained to match the mahogany.

    I stripped one part of the front standard and the problem is that the stripper took off the grain filler also. This just means a lot of work and sanding to re-do the grain filling and then use some sanding sealer, then the clear coat.

    The original finish is actually not that bad and I was able to rub out a few areas with very good results. Another option is to not use chemical stripper and just sand down the finish and apply new lacquer over the existing finish. This will save me from having to the grain filling.

  7. #17

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    Re: Here we go, Century 8x10 Restoration

    I have some extra body and extension rails that I have never identified. Where the slots are they are not flat, they are sort of bi-level on the side, rather like your sketch. I wonder......
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

  8. #18

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    Re: Here we go, Century 8x10 Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    the stripper took off the grain filler also. This just means a lot of work and sanding to re-do the grain filling
    Grain filler is a product that you apply, let dry, and then sand off. It is not just dust left over from sanding. Mahogany was usually filled with a dark grain filler.

  9. #19

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    Re: Here we go, Century 8x10 Restoration

    Jim, Century made two types. One had two slots. One upper slot for the front standard and one lower for the rear standard. The upper slot was just slightly above the lower in order for the back part of the front standard to pass above the rear. The top was just a tad narrower than the bottom portion, again for the same reason. They also made a rail with three slots. Two configured as above, and then a third near the bottom for the tripod slide-block. This one also had a brass strip on the very bottom of the rails, to the outside edge. Fiberq site has a good detailed pic here:
    http://www.fiberq.com/cam/century/centview.htm

  10. #20
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    Re: Here we go, Century 8x10 Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank R View Post
    Grain filler is a product that you apply, let dry, and then sand off. It is not just dust left over from sanding. Mahogany was usually filled with a dark grain filler.
    I guess what I was implying is that I'll be doing a lot less sanding if I don't remove the original finish.

    I had an extra can of tinted filler for a Les Paul guitar I am just finishing, but wound up returning it just before I stared this camera projet

    The piece I stripped is so small, I think I can just build it up with sanding sealer.

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