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Thread: What slide format will survive the digital age

  1. #21

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    Re: What slide format will survive the digital age

    i'm using a 50 euros Vuarde 40 alpinist backpack with great success... with a toyo 810M or a Sinar Norma 8x10.
    i put the holders in a laptop's bag.

    http://www.koodza.fr/Vuarde-40_118_32514.htm

  2. #22

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    Re: What slide format will survive the digital age

    Quote Originally Posted by MJSfoto1956 View Post
    I am going to go out on a limb here and predict that 35mm reversal film will likely disappear soon. Reason: costs and lack of clear benefit to the average Joe (and Hollywood's inevitable move to digital).
    The information above is inaccurate. Hollywood never has, and never will use "reversal" film. They have always used negative film, and still do, even if the end result is distributed on digital media. This is one good reason why color negative film is holding its own, in regards sales, due to large consumption by film and high-end series television. It is futureproofing, as a 35mm color negative can be transferred to any one of many High Definition digital display mediums.

  3. #23

    Re: What slide format will survive the digital age

    Many opinions, but anyone with much in the way of real knowledge would be playing the stock market heavily and generating more cash than most working photographers. Few companies will relieve themselves of profits. I have seen predictions of film demise several years ago, and supposedly I should not be able to buy film today . . . yet, those predictors were wrong. Eventually they might be right; though consider that I can still buy AGFA APX100 from a dead company that will not expire until 2010. I have plenty of time to switch anything that might be necessary to change, in the event all film disappears . . . though I simply have never seen any convincing arguement that it will in my lifetime. Seriously, I can still buy oil paints, from several companies, and that is about as dead as a technology can be dead, and certainly is trumped in resolution by any computer . . . yet, go figure, people still like oil paintings.

    As regards dynamic range, not every image benefits from a wider dynamic range. Often a punchy or more constricted rendering of a scene can carry more appeal. Then there is the current trend towards HDR, much of which I really think looks terrible.

    What I have seen lately is Kodak and Fuji competing less directly in pro films, and spreading the market more between the two companies. The only products I do worry about at all are Polaroid materials; that is now in the hands of a private company, and we really do not know much about what the future will bring; maybe Fuji can step in with more instant films, though Polaroid manipulation might become a lost art form.

    Many television shows are shot on film, despite that the film gets digitized and broadcast. One reason is future proofing, because High Definition is a moving target. Read enough industry news about motion imaging, and you find that HD is nearly dead as a technology, and several players are moving towards 4k, though realizing that something beyond 4k is already in the works. Unless you are doing lots of special effects inserts, quite likely the production is using film. The cost and availability of a Cine Alta, Thompson Viper, or the soon to come Red One are real obstacles for many productions. Yes, some production is all digital capture, but quite a huge volume is still shot on film, even if there is a digital intermediate at some point. Then there is the other end of this, with two companies recently introducing $1M+ machines that do film transfers, taking a digital input and outputting film. There is an emerging market today for film transfers; so much so that companies invest and develop new technology.

    Then there is the profit factor. If some company can generate profits from film production and sales, then film will be available. Maybe that means less choices in the future, but it will not mean no choices.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio
    Last edited by Gordon Moat; 12-Aug-2007 at 22:20. Reason: grammar

  4. #24

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    Re: What slide format will survive the digital age

    Quote Originally Posted by roteague View Post
    Perhaps, but Fuji just posted, over a series of months, a list of labs still doing E6. Additionally, we here sometimes are just too US focused. There are places like the UK, where film, slide film as well, are alive and well. Personally, I think color negative will disappear before color slide film.
    Color negative film is used in disposable cameras, which remain popular for vacationers and in lesser developed countries. For that reason alone I think we'll have 35mm color negative film for quite a while. Slide film I don't know about but it's hard for me to see why it would outlast color negative film. Then again I thought slide film would be gone five years ago so what do I know.
    Brian Ellis
    Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you do criticize them you'll be
    a mile away and you'll have their shoes.

  5. #25
    3d Visual Effects artist
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    Re: What slide format will survive the digital age

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Moat View Post
    Then there is the current trend towards HDR, much of which I really think looks terrible.[/URL]
    I agree! I work with .hdr and .exr images every day at work in 3d. I usually cringe when I see "hdr" posts in photography forums. 'tone mapping' the hdr images down usually looks horrible with ringing and odd or saturation levels. high dynamic range images were developed to capture real-world lighting and reproduce it again in 3d, and for this purpose it works very well! (and large light spheres in real life).

    I can't see how the 'ringing' effect of tone-mapped HDRs looks good to some folks. But then again everyone has their own vision I suppose Maybe the tone-mapping software just needs to be refined so that there is no ringing.

  6. #26

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    Re: What slide format will survive the digital age

    Quote Originally Posted by archivue View Post
    i'm using a 50 euros Vuarde 40 alpinist backpack with great success... with a toyo 810M or a Sinar Norma 8x10.
    i put the holders in a laptop's bag.

    http://www.koodza.fr/Vuarde-40_118_32514.htm
    sorry for that posting, it belongs to an other thread !

  7. #27

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    Re: What slide format will survive the digital age

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Strobel View Post
    Robert, what are the qualities you like in your 35mm slides over your D200?
    Sharpness and color are the two primary factors. Digital sharpness and film sharpness are two different things, and digital just doesn't look right to me. Likewise, digital color looks fake. My opinion only, I respect your right to disagree.

  8. #28

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    Re: What slide format will survive the digital age

    Quote Originally Posted by Gene McCluney View Post
    The information above is inaccurate. Hollywood never has, and never will use "reversal" film. They have always used negative film, and still do, even if the end result is distributed on digital media. This is one good reason why color negative film is holding its own, in regards sales, due to large consumption by film and high-end series television. It is futureproofing, as a 35mm color negative can be transferred to any one of many High Definition digital display mediums.
    Not completely accurate. Exhibition prints are on transparency film and a release with 5,000 exhibition prints in circulation is a lot of transparency film, far more than the amount of negative film used to originally make the film.

    Digital acquisition is becoming more and more common and some 'films' are not done on film at any point in production, namely most of the highly successful animation films. At a recent film exhibitor's convention Trek 3 was screened on a SONY 4K digital projection system. Film could not have remotely come close to what what achieved in an all digital process for that particular application.

    Film will be dead for the most part in Hollywood within ten years for economic and security reasons...my prediction...assuming Hollywood can get past it's archaic passion for 24 fps and the 'film look'.
    Last edited by Charles; 14-Aug-2007 at 04:06. Reason: Clarification

  9. #29

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    Re: What slide format will survive the digital age

    I am very much involved in digital printing, but for capture I much prefer film. And I don't believe it is hard to make a case that for persons who are not on deadline, and are simply interested in optimum quality, medium format in 6X7 or 6X9 formats still equals or beats the very best digital SLR, and at much less cost, and with 4X5 and above there should be no argument at all. However, it does seem to me from the work I have seen that digital SLR clearly beats the best 35mm, and easily.

    So my thinking is that 35mm slide film will be the first to go, though it may be around for a lot of years. Between medium format and 4X5, I would not bet.

    Just for the record, I would not personally miss the loss of slide film at all. I use only color negative film in 120 and 220, with Fuji and Mamiya 6X7 and 6X9 rangefinder cameras, which I scan and print digitally, and sometimes convert to digital negative for printing in carbon or pt./pd.

    Sandy King

  10. #30

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    Re: What slide format will survive the digital age

    What slide format will survive the digital age Reply to Thread

    I reckon this'll be the only kind of slide that makes it through:


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