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Thread: Over exposed TMAX100

  1. #1

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    Over exposed TMAX100

    Being new to LF, this is the first time I have run in to this situation, but I'm sure it will not be the last

    After changing lenses, I neglected to put on a 6 stop ND filter but did not neglect to include it in my exposure calculation. So I have a negative and backup that is over exposed by 6 stops. I went ahead a developed one with normal time just to see what 6 stops over on TMAX100 looks like and there seems to be quite a bit of info on the negative although very dense. I was wondering the best way to develop the backup for best results from scanning? Would not N-1 make the negative lighter but also with less contrast? Is there a way to lighten development AND preserve contrast, N-1 w/ vigorous agitation? Isn't more agitation the same as adding development time, thus resulting in somewhat normal development? Is there another solution?

    Thanks in advance,
    -alan

  2. #2

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    Re: Over exposed TMAX100

    What are your developing times? You may wish to pull process, and underdevelop the neg, either cut the developing time or possibly use a slightly weaker solution.

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    Re: Over exposed TMAX100

    My normal is D-76, 1:1, 68F, 11minutes. I use a Jobo 2521 and roll by hand. Wouldn't less time result in a lighter negative but also a reduce the contrast in the negative? Is there a way to preserve contrast the objective being scanning not enlarger.

    Thanks,
    -alan

  4. #4

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    Re: Over exposed TMAX100

    possibly a stronger concentration for a dramatically reduced time will bring a higher contrast but risk losing too many tones.

    Maybe knock the developing time to 20 minutes, and try 1:4 or more. You'll lose some contrast, but that can be worked on in post-processing, I think you should be concerned with pulling as much detail from the neg as possible, rather than strong blacks and bright whites

  5. #5

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    Re: Over exposed TMAX100

    Come to think of it...have you looked here for more info?

    http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.html

    select your film and developer, and you should get these results

    Massive Dev Chart Search Results
    Film Developer Dilution ASA/ISO 35mm 120 Sheet Temp Notes
    TMax 100 D-76 1+1 64 12 20C [notes]
    TMax 100 D-76 stock 100-200 6.5 6.5 5.75 20C
    TMax 100 D-76 stock 100-200 9 9 7 20C [notes]
    TMax 100 D-76 1+1 100 9.5 9.5 11.25 20C [notes]
    TMax 100 D-76 1+1 100-200 12 12 11.5 20C [notes]
    TMax 100 D-76 1+3 100-200 16 16 20C [notes]
    TMax 100 D-76 stock 400 8.25 8.25 20C
    TMax 100 D-76 stock 400 11 11 20C [notes]

    you need to check the page yourself to read all the notes

    if you're over by 6 stops, then 100,200,400,800,1600,3200,6400 (I guess that's the right way of working out EI) so you'll need some serious experimenting.

    you could run a test neg. expose two more at 6400 (or however you exposed before) and try two developing times, at either extreme - way too long/weak, and way too short/strong maybe?

  6. #6
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    Re: Over exposed TMAX100

    Thinking about post-processing treatments for your already-developed negative, I believe there are different formulations of Farmer's reducer, or other chemical reducers, that allow you to control the degree of proportionality of the reducing effect, and in that way control the effect on contrast.

    With a given developer, cutting development will reduce overall contrast. It's the nature of the beast. ("Exposure controls density, development controls contrast.") Within that overall constraint, the curve shape of TMX is responsive to choice of developer, so there's some control at least over relative contrast in different parts of the scale.

    Have you tried scanning the developed negative, or is it literally impossible? If you can get a scan, seeing what, if anything, is wrong with the scan will help you decide what specific "medicine" you need for your next try.

  7. #7
    Robert Oliver Robert Oliver's Avatar
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    Re: Over exposed TMAX100

    How about stand or semi-stand developement method using something like Rodinal or pryocat HD. Might help keep some of the highlights from completely blowing out. Never tried it on an over exposed neg. just one with too much contrast, completely exposed for the shadow detail.
    Robert Oliver

  8. #8
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Re: Over exposed TMAX100

    I've scanned negatives that were overexposed several stops. I've also used Potassium Ferricyanide to thin down negatives that were overexposed. The results were good enough for some purposes, and much better than trying to print the original negatives.

  9. #9

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    Re: Over exposed TMAX100

    Robert,

    Semi-stand, stand development? I am not familiar. Based on a quick search, does it have to do with the amount of agitation?

    Thanks,
    -alan

  10. #10
    Maris Rusis's Avatar
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    Re: Over exposed TMAX100

    Something similar happened to me on a TMY 8x10 shoot. I forgot to stop down to f.64 and shot wide open at f. 5.6; 7 stops over!

    After normal development in X-tol the negative in the fixer at lights-on was very dark with hints of detail. An exposure of about 30 minutes in a contact frame yielded a surprisingly good gelatin-silver photograph except that the depth of field was lacking. Large format film apparently is very forgiving of overexposure!

    Going further, I cut this negative back in Farmer's reducer until it looked about normal density. Back in the contact frame and with a 10 second exposure it yielded another gelatin-silver photograph very much like the first one; no gain, no loss.

    If I really had to use the dark negative for projection work instead of contact I would use it to make a contact film positive then use this to produce a copy neg of tractable density.
    Photography:first utterance. Sir John Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society. "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..".

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