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Thread: Hand-coloring Ambrotypes?

  1. #11

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    Re: Hand-coloring Ambrotypes?

    I believe the traditional method was transparent watercolor. The advantage is the possibility of easy removal as used by watercolorists. I've never hand colored a complete print, but I do small parts, and use nothing else for spotting prints made by any process.

  2. #12

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    Re: Hand-coloring Ambrotypes?

    If you are going to cover it with enamel then I'd suggest sticking with enamel paints, or mixing your own.You don't really want to cover one medium with another as often they are going to cause problems down the road with cracking or adhesion.

    Also if you are going to cover the paint with black enamel and view it through the back side then the transparency thing isn't as important since the paint will be sitting behind the collodion. You may want the paint to be more opaque to show off the color against the black.

  3. #13
    bob carnie's Avatar
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    Re: Hand-coloring Ambrotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    I believe the traditional method was transparent watercolor. The advantage is the possibility of easy removal as used by watercolorists. I've never hand colored a complete print, but I do small parts, and use nothing else for spotting prints made by any process.
    I use watercolour crayons to accent colours on my gum bichromate prints, very easy to apply and when dry the application if done right is invisible .

  4. #14
    Mark Sawyer's Avatar
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    Re: Hand-coloring Ambrotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by PRJ View Post
    If you are going to cover it with enamel then I'd suggest sticking with enamel paints, or mixing your own. You don't really want to cover one medium with another as often they are going to cause problems down the road with cracking or adhesion.

    Also if you are going to cover the paint with black enamel and view it through the back side then the transparency thing isn't as important since the paint will be sitting behind the collodion. You may want the paint to be more opaque to show off the color against the black.
    There is a history of people using enamel on uncolored Ambrotypes without a peeling problem, so I'm thinking it's okay. The shellac-based drawing inks are similar to the collodion, so I think they'll be compatible too.

    From what I've seen and read, transparency is important for whatever colors are used. The Ambrotype image is about 1/3 the density of a normal negative, so the colors show through and become garish and overstated easily.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    I believe the traditional method was transparent watercolor. The advantage is the possibility of easy removal as used by watercolorists. I've never hand colored a complete print, but I do small parts, and use nothing else for spotting prints made by any process.
    Quote Originally Posted by bob carnie View Post
    I use watercolour crayons to accent colours on my gum bichromate prints, very easy to apply and when dry the application if done right is invisible.
    From what I've read, watercolors of any sort have a tendency to bleed when enamel or other black backing is applied. I may play with them anyways, we have to find out for ourselves...

    Thanks for the thoughts everyone!
    "I love my Verito lens, but I always have to sharpen everything in Photoshop..."

  5. #15
    Zebra
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    Re: Hand-coloring Ambrotypes?

    Here is a hand colored true 5 x 7 Ferrotype. I used the method Jody discussed learned from the Ostermanís. Crushed pastels applied with a very fine small paint brush. Lots of applying and blowing off and then more applying. Applied Pre varnish and then the vsrnish mutes the colors to subtlety which was my preference. Iím by no mean an expert but Iíve done some. All the same way with happy to me results. Mark Osterman is very good at it. Might be worth looking up some of his work.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails D92DC50D-5526-4A42-AC25-560B4C9493D4.jpg  

  6. #16
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Hand-coloring Ambrotypes?

    This

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    I believe the traditional method was transparent watercolor. The advantage is the possibility of easy removal as used by watercolorists. I've never hand colored a complete print, but I do small parts, and use nothing else for spotting prints made by any process.
    Tin Can

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