Page 1 of 9 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 88

Thread: Must your image be technical perfect ?

  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    307

    Must your image be technical perfect ?

    The question is: do you want the complete image to be sharp, and have every detail in the shadows ?

    For a long time this was quite important to me, but I have seen my style changing over the years.
    Some views need to be completely sharp (except when using soft focus lenses). But I don't find this a must anymore.

    A landscape can have a soft foreground and a sharp main subject, or some shadows may be complete dark. I find this more natural as we see this with our eyes.

    Then you have of course the impression of the artist who deliberate places thing out of focus, or creates harsh images in black & white, or a shallow depth but this is something completely different.

    I see these questions pop-up on a regularly base in the forums so I'm curious, so do you go for perfection or more the natural way ?

  2. #2
    Tin Can's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    19,800

    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    I shot only Pentax no meter, never a flash for 50 years

    I wanted sharp

    This last 10 years, LFPF has changed my eye
    Tin Can

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Sheridan, Colorado
    Posts
    1,845

    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    The "f64 group" started this "everything in focus" idea one hundred years ago. Fortunately it was a craze that died out. Every photographer has to make their own decision every time they make an exposure based on the subject and their intent & preferences.

    If you want a subject 100% in focus, make it that way. Another photographer will choose to have just a small plane in focus.

    Neither is right or wrong, good or bad.

    It's the same with choosing a lens, selecting a film, the print size, and even the frame you put it in -- if any.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Newbury, Vermont
    Posts
    1,748

    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    Whatever works best for a given image (no matter if this means blown out highlights, greyed out featureless shadows, etc.) is how I define the term "technically perfect."

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,370

    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    I like the subject to be in focus and I don't like textureless high values, but I don't mind inky black shadows areas as long as it doesn't distract from the image. Soft focus is fine, if it's done with intention. That said, we LF photographers face limited DOF and little use of higher shutter speeds to stop motion. Therefore, many times we need to decide what part of the image we're going to have softer and/or how subject movement is going to affect the image. I used to not shoot a forest scene, for example, due to wind, but after I time I learned to embrace the movement of ferns, leaves, etc. This motion can impart a dynamic feeling to the photograph. Anyway, I'm with John...it's within each of us how we define "technically perfect."

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    North of Chicago
    Posts
    1,690

    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    Have you seen Sally Mann's landscapes? I dare say they exhibit some imperfections, and for me are some of the most evocative landscape photographs I've ever seen. Others may disagree...

    https://www.sallymann.com/southern-landscapes
    ____________________________________________

    Richard Wasserman

    https://www.rwasserman.com/

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Posts
    356

    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Wasserman View Post
    Have you seen Sally Mann's landscapes? I dare say they exhibit some imperfections, and for me are some of the most evocative landscape photographs I've ever seen. Others may disagree...

    https://www.sallymann.com/southern-landscapes
    I love Sally Mann's work!
    Ron McElroy
    Memphis

  8. #8
    Niels
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    108

    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Wasserman View Post
    Have you seen Sally Mann's landscapes? I dare say they exhibit some imperfections..
    "some imperfections" :-)
    Just goes to show that "perfection" is really subjective. I love Sally Mann's work as well, although my preference is the Immediate Family work.
    ----
    Niels

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    1,216

    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    I believe the image should show what you want it to show, sharp or not.

    That said, the excuse of "I wantlike it that way" is NO excuse for shoddy work, poor exposure, processing and printing.

    Tecnically perfect is just fine as long as it isn't "technically perfect, boring picture". Then again - maybe that is Your World?
    "My forumla for successful printing remains ordinary chemicals, an ordinary enlarger, music, a bottle of scotch - and stubbornness." W. Eugene Smith

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    San Clemente, California
    Posts
    3,673

    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    Quote Originally Posted by PatrickMarq View Post
    The question is: do you want the complete image to be sharp, and have every detail in the shadows ?...
    Yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by xkaes View Post
    The "f64 group" started this "everything in focus" idea one hundred years ago. Fortunately it was a craze that died out...
    It wasn't a "craze." It was and is an aesthetic. It didn't "die out" any more than it became universal.

    Bottom line: whether style of photography or any other aesthetic decision, there's only a single factor that drives: does one like it. Dogma, no matter the context it arises in, is optimally eschewed.

Similar Threads

  1. Flat lens offers a perfect image
    By Sylvester Graham in forum Lenses & Lens Accessories
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 27-Aug-2012, 12:43
  2. Technical questions concerning an image...
    By Carterofmars in forum Style & Technique
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 9-May-2012, 19:51
  3. Technical versus non-technical approaches - which?
    By Robert McClure in forum On Photography
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 7-Jan-2006, 14:12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •