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Thread: Must your image be technical perfect ?

  1. #81

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    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    I haven't read through this entire thread... but my gut reaction to the question is "You just don't want to be making excuses about your work".
    Last edited by Mark Sampson; 29-Oct-2022 at 11:36.

  2. #82

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    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    As a survivor of three-hour-long critiques in college...

    Yes.

  3. #83
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    Screw critique

    I was verbally beat up in several Art Schools

    I create for myself

    To thine own self be true!
    Tin Can

  4. #84
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    Screw critique

    I was verbally beat up in several Art Schools

    I create for myself

    To thine own self be true!
    Some people are more flexible about the self. I am more along the lines of "The mind cannot know the Mind".
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  5. #85
    Scott Davis
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    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    It all depends on your goal for the image. If your goal is to make a landscape in the style of the f/64 group, then yes, it needs to be technically perfect. If your goal is to make an image that is more painterly, then no. I wouldn't use a Holga with its guaranteed imperfections to create the same kind of image I would make with a Schneider Super-Angulon on an Ebony 5x7.

    Looked at another way, though, the answer could be always "yes", with the understanding that technically perfect means something different in different contexts. If you are using a Holga, or a pinhole camera, then you should use the best Holga/Pinhole technique possible to get the most out of the image you are creating. Ditto with the Ebony/Schneider combination. Depth of field, perspective, and sharp focus need to be placed appropriately and effectively for each image, which could be nowhere at all in a given image.

  6. #86

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    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    ...what was that book - "The Democratic Forest" ? W. Eggleston I think - photos composed "thoughtlessly on purpose," and...yup - they were pretty "bad" but also compelling and somewhat instructive, and even inspiring in that it has helped me to more thoughtfully see and relate to the often chaotic and way less than "visually perfect" aspects of nature. Sure I look at stuff when I'm out with my camera and can fairly quickly tell if something will, might, might not, or absolutely will not work for me (always subject to change of course)...but otherwise I absolutely don't hold any of what I see as "better" or "worse."

    Edit: But maybe the above belongs in a different thread - as something which does not appear as "visually perfect" can still be "technically perfect?" Hmmm....

  7. #87
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    Quote Originally Posted by John Layton View Post
    ...

    Edit: But maybe the above belongs in a different thread - as something which does not appear as "visually perfect" can still be "technically perfect?" Hmmm....
    It looks like they are getting mixed together anyway.

    To have everything in focus is not just a technological process to get 'perfect', but also an artistic decision to create the image one wants. The use of a soft-focus lens or to have a limited DoF to create one's desired image can be done technically perfect, or not well at all.

    But the most important thing to remember in showing a group of work -- try very hard to have all the images/prints equally 'perfect'. An exceptionally 'perfect' print will make the rest look weak...and/or, a less 'perfect' print than all the others will stand out like a sore thumb, or broken little toe.

    Editing one's work is not easy -- impossible for some. Years ago I cut all the mats for a local show of French street photography by Terence Ford -- Harrison's brother. Some great images, but the show should have been cut down by a third at a minimum. But his ego would not allow it and the show suffered greatly for it.
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  8. #88
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Re: Must your image be technical perfect ?

    I always use a tripod and aim for focal perfection in my landscape shots. However, when I look at Lomography shots others have done, I like the off-the-cuff feeling, an artsy look. I understand why people find these attractive- they're different. It's like the old pictorialist pictures. I suppose it's why people shoot expired film or use special film chemicals and applications that provide unique results. They're different.

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