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Thread: Horseman vs. LF

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    127

    Horseman vs. LF

    Hello folks,

    Is there any difference between using a Horseman SW-612 and a 4x5 LF camera, and then cropping the image to equal the same size of the 6x12 negative produced from the Horseman? Assuming that both use the same lens, they should produce the exact same image (after the 4x5 negative is cropped to equal the 6x12), right?

    I was just wondering, because I'm getting more and more interested in these panorama cameras. Then again, it appears that my LF camera can already produce the same kind of panoramas...I just need to crop the negative to make it look longer. Or am I wrong?

  2. #2

    Horseman vs. LF

    Your intuition did not fail you. If the same lens is on both, you get the same image, and even same depth of field---unless you would have used movements (perspective and focus-plane control) on the 4x5 that cannot be duplicated on the Horseman 612. With the Horseman, you gain film economy, and you are less likely to miss the decisive moment because you can shoot faster. But you lose movements, and you lose lens options.

  3. #3

    Horseman vs. LF

    Or buy a Horseman 612 back for your 4x5.

    You get the movements, all your lenses, and you can shoot more quickly than changing 4x5 film holders or quickloads (readyloads).

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?A=details&kw=HOFB61245&is=REG&Q=&O=productlist&sku=22849

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    139

    Horseman vs. LF

    Emre... you are correct in your thinking. A cropped 4x5 is identical to a 6x12 image, using the SAME lens. The primary advantage of a dedicated 6x12 camera is its much smaller size/weight, and the use of 120/220 rollfilm. If the larger/heavier 4x5 camera is not a problem, you could add a 6x12 film back and use 120/220 film as well.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    127

    Horseman vs. LF

    Thanks everyone for making this clear. I thought I was right, but had to assure myself with the experts on here

    Walter - You got me excited there for a second, until I saw the price! That's how much I paid for my lenses. Maybe I can find a used back somewhere...the idea of rollfilm seems interesting.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    781

    Horseman vs. LF

    Emre, or shoot 5x7 Canham camera, then you can shoot LF and 6x17 with the same lenses, and plus your Panoramics are now at the norm, 3:1 aspect ratio, vs. 2:1. In addition you add movements to your pans... just a thought....

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2,480

    Horseman vs. LF

    A dedicated 6x12 will give you the advantage of quick shooting, as it was said. That advantage alone can not only multiply your photographic output considerably but can steer you towards new subject that otherwise are not prone to LF photography. It's an entirely different field of photography that is accessible with a dedicated panoramic camera.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,217

    Horseman vs. LF

    In principle, there is no difference. In practice, the Horseman-SW is designed to be used with short focal length lenses, down to 35 mm. With a large format camera, you might find it difficult to use such lenses, even with a bag bellows and a recessed lens board.

  9. #9

    Horseman vs. LF

    Emre

    gps and Leonard both make valid points about the advantage of the dedicated body.

    I was just assuming that you already have a 4x5 w/lenses, so didn't want the expense of a dedicated camera with roll film back.

    Yes the price of a new 4x5 roll film back takes my breath away, I own two.

    But check eBay and other venues for used gear.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/HORSEMAN-6x12-panoramic-Roll-Film-Back-Holder-Type-612_W0QQitemZ7592868860QQcategoryZ29979QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    Or stores such as Lens & Repro in NYC.

    Glad we've all been helpful.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Dec 1997
    Location
    Baraboo, Wisconsin
    Posts
    7,695

    Horseman vs. LF

    Right. Which is one reason I've never understood the appeal of roll film holders except as a means of carrying more film with less weight and bulk. It isn't difficult to visually crop on the ground glass, many ground glasses already contain cropping lines to help you do that. And if yours doesn't or if you find it difficult to visually crop just make a little carboard cropping frame in 6x12 (or whatever) dimensions and hold or tape it against the ground glass as you're composing).
    Brian Ellis
    Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you do criticize them you'll be
    a mile away and you'll have their shoes.

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