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Thread: Music as analogy for LF photography

  1. #161

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    Re: Music as analogy for LF photography

    Years ago at Chaco Canyon...saw a guy wearing some very expensive looking headphones, attached to some even more expensive looking recording equipment, and two leads taped to a rock - part of a stone structure (Chetro Kettle I think). Nobody else around...he motions me to come over, and hands me the headphones - saying "you've got to listen to this!" It was amazing...the rocks were making a sound that I still cannot describe - there was resonance, friction, movement. Turns out this guy was an environmental sound engineer/artist of some sort, and had just received a huge grant to travel the earth and listen to (and record) its sounds. How cool is that?!

  2. #162

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    Re: Music as analogy for LF photography

    Quote Originally Posted by John Layton View Post
    Years ago at Chaco Canyon...saw a guy wearing some very expensive looking headphones, attached to some even more expensive looking recording equipment, and two leads taped to a rock - part of a stone structure (Chetro Kettle I think). Nobody else around...he motions me to come over, and hands me the headphones - saying "you've got to listen to this!" It was amazing...the rocks were making a sound that I still cannot describe - there was resonance, friction, movement. Turns out this guy was an environmental sound engineer/artist of some sort, and had just received a huge grant to travel the earth and listen to (and record) its sounds. How cool is that?!
    Way cool!

    In 2001 I spent 3-4 months driving the Yukon and Alaska. I worked a lot on the glaciers. Standing on the ice in the stillness, the glaciers sang to me; cracks and zings and creaks and moans; resonances and harmonies I had not expected. It was as if the ice were alive. I feel the stones in the Southwest to be alive as well; they just don't sing as loudly.

    Doremus

  3. #163

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    Re: Music as analogy for LF photography

    So many LF answers with classical and jazz and smilar. Much contemplative music - must be to match the zen like experience of the LF process.

    Thought maybe I would throw in one to match Minox users. ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Gc4QTqslN4
    "My forumla for successful printing remains ordinary chemicals, an ordinary enlarger, music, a bottle of scotch - and stubbornness." W. Eugene Smith

  4. #164

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    Re: Music as analogy for LF photography

    Hilarious. Good example of a 21st century schizoid man. Love the drum interlude.

    At least then they weren’t denying the existence of birds as drones etc. counter reality as a temporary antidote to existential stress.

    Two LFer colorists who displayed primal beauty in Appalachia, E. Porter, and a much lesser known but friend from the west coast, Pat O’Hara, no relation to Joe on this forum to the best of my knowledge. Are there others of prominence I missed. Can we exceed their efforts?

    I still photograph real birds, hundreds times easier than LF, but the latter is usually more satisfying.

  5. #165
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Re: Music as analogy for LF photography

    Quote Originally Posted by John Layton View Post
    Years ago at Chaco Canyon...saw a guy wearing some very expensive looking headphones, attached to some even more expensive looking recording equipment, and two leads taped to a rock - part of a stone structure (Chetro Kettle I think). Nobody else around...he motions me to come over, and hands me the headphones - saying "you've got to listen to this!" It was amazing...the rocks were making a sound that I still cannot describe - there was resonance, friction, movement. Turns out this guy was an environmental sound engineer/artist of some sort, and had just received a huge grant to travel the earth and listen to (and record) its sounds. How cool is that?!
    3/4 or 4/4 time?

  6. #166

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    Re: Music as analogy for LF photography

    "Cosmos" music from the 70s was often times 7/4, 11/8 etc, and chromatic sequencing (as opposed to CA).

  7. #167
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Music as analogy for LF photography

    As practicing mystic

    I read birds and weather as music, to guide my course

    on a map only I see, hear, feel, taste, smell

    Sin Eater, one time...

  8. #168
    Land-Scapegrace Heroique's Avatar
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    Re: Music as analogy for LF photography

    Quote Originally Posted by pdmoylan View Post
    Heroique, not to go too far with this, but if you read Finding The Mother Tree, for instance, the communication and interconnectedness in the root systems of trees in an area speaks volumes of how we have lost that same sense of connection with the earth...
    Suzanne Simard, the author or your book “The Mother Tree,” is pretty well known in my PNW region, receiving her PhD in Forest Services in Oregon and working now with Univ. of BC. Her book needs to be on the shelf of every visitor to this thread – or even better, checked out from the local library. Same with her predecessor’s book, Peter Wohlleben’s “The Secret Life of Trees.” One should be wary, however, of their sentimentality about nature and especially trees. To help moderate their frequent human projections onto the Plantae kingdom, one should keep nearby, say, any number of books by Richard Dawkins, perhaps “The Selfish Gene” to recommend just one (again, at the local library). Trees (he would correctly argue) really aren’t full of human-like “caring” for each other or “communicating” through a means we can “understand” or respond to as a tree, no matter how much these well-meaning and highly trained authors would like us to believe. To be sure, Simard and Wohlleben might listen more closely to Dawkins who eternally reminds his readers that genes aren’t really “selfish,” though the consequences of their chemical/evolutionary processes make it appear that they are (including the genes of trees, which behave just as “selfishly” as ours, even though they’re not really feeling that way). But Simard and Wohlleben’s books can go a long way at reinvigorating our perceptions of the wild in a positive way and suggest potentially new, fruitful directions in strictly scientific research.

    Long story short: all three books above are excellent.

    Quote Originally Posted by Doremus Scudder View Post
    I feel the stones in the Southwest to be alive as well; they just don't sing as loudly.
    Yes, well, until you start hearing the porous and crumbly sandstone rock falls (and spalls), both loud and faint, that sing every hour of the day and every hour of the night. Still (sorry for the intended pun), no other place I’ve ever visited has offered me purer silence. My mild tinnitus loves this place; I treat the malady to a vacation here at least once every 2-3 years! Only in the Hoh River Rain Forest (Olympic Peninsula, Wash. state) have I personally discovered a place with longer periods free of the sounds of civilization (such as airliners). High Desert canyons and Wash. state rain forests are splendid places for an LFer to hear music on the GG.
    Last edited by Heroique; 19-Dec-2021 at 13:16.

  9. #169
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Music as analogy for LF photography

    I thought fungi among all tree roots carried communication very wide

    https://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/2...of-the-forest/

  10. #170
    Land-Scapegrace Heroique's Avatar
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    Re: Music as analogy for LF photography

    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    I thought fungi among all tree roots carried communication very wide.
    The communication is indeed real, and potentially increases the chance that others on the receiving end will survive if the communication has beneficial Darwinian consequences. Call it natural selection working on random genetic variation. It works automatically – not because the fungi or the trees feel the milk of human kindness, like one of us might feel who decides to help an old lady across a busy street. (The giraffe’s neck didn’t grow longer because the giraffe kept wishing that it would, and kept stretching so that it could; it happened automatically.) I might quickly add that understanding nature in terms of Darwinian evolution can still offer lessons about how we might better help each other on levels that have little to do with science. Truth in the service of goodness. Myths have an important role too. That is, more important than the ability to distinguish truth from myth is the ability to be good to each other and the earth.

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