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Thread: Provia 100F and Velvia 50

  1. #11

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    Re: Provia 100F and Velvia 50

    _?_ explain why with great detail _?_


    Bernice


    Quote Originally Posted by SergeyT View Post
    My rules for using color positive film are:
    Anything at or below 1/60 @ F8 is fine.
    Anything 1/80 @ F8 is border line (better to skip it)
    Anything above 1/125 @ F8 - I don't do it.

  2. #12
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Provia 100F and Velvia 50

    OK. Thanks, Sergey. That's what I surmised. I do have a moldy brain, math-wise, so simply use the little dial on my Pentax spotmeter, which does it automatically.

  3. #13

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    Re: Provia 100F and Velvia 50

    What if lighting ratios (non "natural single light source aka sun) are involved?
    Errors can easily creep in with each translation. Fewer steps, fewer possibility of errors.


    Bernice


    Quote Originally Posted by SergeyT View Post
    I always measure at that setting and then translate into the actual gear (camera\lens) settings
    My math teacher kept saying that if students don't do match their brain become moldy...

  4. #14

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    Provia 100F and Velvia 50

    Quote Originally Posted by SergeyT View Post
    My rules for using color positive film are:
    Anything at or below 1/60 @ F8 is fine.
    Anything 1/80 @ F8 is border line (better to skip it)
    Anything above 1/125 @ F8 - I don't do it.
    Iím also lost. Why is the answer expressed as a particular EV (thatís essentially what the time/aperture product gives you, when the other parameters, like iso, are constant) rather than dynamic range?

    Unless you are implying a particular expected dynamic range based on EV, but I can hardly see how thatís generically valid. For example I can recreate very easily the equivalent of 1/125 @ F8 for a portrait in my studio. In fact I will usually shoot above that.

    /confused

  5. #15

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    Re: Provia 100F and Velvia 50

    Adder, exposure tolerance for color transparency film about plus or minus 1/3 f-stop.

    Accuracy exposure is absolutely essential for color transparency film.


    Bernice

  6. #16

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    Re: Provia 100F and Velvia 50

    I am exposing my film in natural light only.
    ISO 100 mostly. Meter settings in the previous post are for the ISO 100 (sorry, I had to mention that).
    I find that outside of that range the images look either too harsh or too contrasty. Pretty much anything within that range records on positive film just right.
    With such approach I do not have to think or worry about DR of my scene or DR of my film.

  7. #17

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    Re: Provia 100F and Velvia 50

    Except Natural "sun light" varies LOTs depending on the time of day, color temperature shift causing color shifts in the color transparency film which is a fixed-given for color transparency film. Add to this, lighting ratios difficult to control adding another factor-variable to image colors rendered on any color transparency film.

    For some none of this is of any importance, others not tolerable in any way. Much about knowing precisely what will change the designed color rendition, density-saturation of any given color transparency film... then making choices that meet a specific image goal.

    Bernice


    Quote Originally Posted by SergeyT View Post
    I am exposing my film in natural light only.
    ISO 100 mostly. Meter settings in the previous post are for the ISO 100 (sorry, I had to mention that).
    I find that outside of that range the images look either too harsh or too contrasty. Pretty much anything within that range records on positive film just right.
    With such approach I do not have to think or worry about DR of my scene or DR of my film.

  8. #18
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Re: Provia 100F and Velvia 50

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernice Loui View Post
    Adder, exposure tolerance for color transparency film about plus or minus 1/3 f-stop.

    Accuracy exposure is absolutely essential for color transparency film.


    Bernice
    Many pros used to shoot chromes at 1/3 less of a stop to increase color saturation. Makes them "POP".

    What I found interesting with negative color film like even Portra, is that when I bracket it, the colors actually shift. So while different exposures might work as far as getting lighting correct, the colors are different.

  9. #19
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Provia 100F and Velvia 50

    That would mainly be crossover with color neg films, and is very difficult to correct at time. It's always better to filter for correct color balance at the time of the shot, and use rated actual box speed per 18% middle gray reading. Some of the old advice about overexposing color neg films and underexposing chromes doesn't work well with today's professional films. More of an old wives tale at this point in time.

    Another interesting thing is that Kodak and Fuji seem to differ on their precise definition of "photographic daylight". It's long been rumored that for Fuji chrome films, including Provia and Velvia, it's 5200K, and more own experience and careful testing seems to confirm that. But with Kodak it's always official been and proved to be 5500K.

  10. #20

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    Re: Provia 100F and Velvia 50

    There was a time Kodak made more than one version of "Ektachrome"

    ~Kodak E100

    ~Kodak E100S

    ~Kodak Lumiere

    ~and so on.. This was much about color saturation and inherent color balance designed into the film.
    As previously discussed during this specific discussion under/over expose even by 1/3 f-stop can and will alter color balance. E6 processing can alter color balance. There is also the same over expose/under develop, underexpose/over develop thing for color transparency films.

    Under expose does not always produce "higher contrast. Nor is "higher contrast" a "pro" thing or commercially desirable thing, higher contrast is just higher contrast. As the film contrast curve becomes steeper due to the "higher contrast" consider what is lost in this steeper film density curve?

    Keep in mind, this higher contrast look became a "thing" back in those days and why view camera lens manufactures went about designing and producing "higher contrast" lenses via coatings and other lens design elements..

    Consider why Fuji Velvia remains one of the most popular color transparency films while Fuji Astia died in the market decades ago.

    All serves as a reminder about this previous LFF discussion:
    [https://www.largeformatphotography.i...r-here-and-now

    Become relevant at about post# 24.



    Bernice




    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    Many pros used to shoot chromes at 1/3 less of a stop to increase color saturation. Makes them "POP".

    What I found interesting with negative color film like even Portra, is that when I bracket it, the colors actually shift. So while different exposures might work as far as getting lighting correct, the colors are different.

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