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Thread: Why Not Movie Film Filters?

  1. #1
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Why Not Movie Film Filters?

    Just got this in email

    https://www.polarprofilters.com/prod...BoCsDsQAvD_BwE

    These add 'streaks' but many more

  2. #2
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Why Not Movie Film Filters?

    That link must be so obscene that my computer security won't even allow me to me bring it up. Doesn't surprise me. I can put up with all the traditional Harrison and Harrison filter tweaks to seriously contemplated movie photography; but if it involves silly filters - not my cup of tea. Now there are editing apps for all that foolishness anyway.

  3. #3

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    Re: Why Not Movie Film Filters?

    Hi Tin Can,

    It sounds like you received a promo e-mail for the screw-in versions of PolarPro's three special effects filters, Mist, BlueMorphic and GoldMorphic.

    As you may know, Tiffen ProMist is a series of diffusion filters that are widely used in filmmaking, both analogue and digital. The series comes in many weights and two variations. PolarPro is selling its version of this filter in two weights.

    As I'm sure you know, one of the strongest trends in filmmaking is shooting with anamorphic lenses. BlueMorphic and GoldMorphic result in images that have a highly stylised, semi-anamorphic "look". As far as I know, similar "streak" filters have existed for a long time, but without an anamorphic marketing connection.

    There are many videos on YouTube that demonstrate ProMist. PolarPro having released its three special effects filters about eight months ago, there are also a good number of YouTube videos about its three filters. Note that most of the people who make YouTube videos about PolarPro products are either paid to make the videos or have received free product. I'm not saying that there's anything wrong with this, but it's something that you should be aware of.

    I should note that PolarPro first released these filters for its Basecamp Matte Box, which has become quite popular. Basecamp is a proprietary matte box system. Unless something has changed recently, other brands of rectangular filter will not fit a Basecamp Matte Box, and PolarPro's rectangular filters won't fit other matte boxes. Personally, I think that buying into Basecamp is a big mistake. Consequently, I would suggest that you only consider the screw-in versions of these special effects filters.

    Personally, I don't own any PolarPro filters. It's a young, aggressive company that started by making filters for cameras on drones and for the GoPro action camera. In the last two or three years, it has expanded its product line significantly. I don't see people questioning the quality of its products.

    Cheers
    Last edited by r.e.; 16-Oct-2021 at 05:59.

  4. #4
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Why Not Movie Film Filters?

    Thanks for the detailed reply

    I have used ProMist 20 years' ago and only on 35mm or early Digi

    I believe there are no rules in photography

    Results are all that matter

  5. #5

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    Re: Why Not Movie Film Filters?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    Thanks for the detailed reply

    I have used ProMist 20 years' ago and only on 35mm or early Digi

    I believe there are no rules in photography

    Results are all that matter
    The reason that many digital cinematographers are using ProMist is that it takes the edge off the digital "look". The filter's effect can be quite pleasing. It's also something that should be addressed, if desired, in camera. This is not something that I would want to tackle in Blackmagic's DaVinci Resolve or Apple's Final Cut Pro X, which are the two editing applications that I use.

    If you want to revisit Tiffen ProMist, it can be a bit of a maze initially. As you'll see from a B&H search, there are a number of variations and weights. YouTube videos about ProMist can be helpful in narrowing options.

    A B&H search will also show that these filters are not inexpensive, at least in the 82mm size that has become more or less standard in cinematography when using a screw-in filter rather than a matte box. I haven't checked how PolarPro's versions compare on price, but as I mentioned above PolarPro filters have a pretty good reputation on quality of glass.
    Last edited by r.e.; 16-Oct-2021 at 05:38.

  6. #6
    Pieter's Avatar
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    Re: Why Not Movie Film Filters?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    Thanks for the detailed reply

    I have used ProMist 20 years' ago and only on 35mm or early Digi

    I believe there are no rules in photography

    Results are all that matter
    ProMist is so 90's. I can't believe anyone uses them anymore.

  7. #7

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    Re: Why Not Movie Film Filters?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pieter View Post
    ProMist is so 90's. I can't believe anyone uses them anymore.
    Here in 2021, ProMist is being widely used in digital cinematography. What's interesting is that you haven't noticed

  8. #8
    Pieter's Avatar
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    Re: Why Not Movie Film Filters?

    Quote Originally Posted by r.e. View Post
    Here in 2021, ProMist is being widely used in digital cinematography. What's interesting is that you haven't noticed
    Yeah. I don't go to the movies anymore, it's mostly crap. So is TV.

  9. #9

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    Re: Why Not Movie Film Filters?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pieter View Post
    Yeah. I don't go to the movies anymore, it's mostly crap. So is TV.
    Cool

    What's happening in cinematography is that a somewhat hard digital look is being diffused with filtration. Not in every shot, but when desired. Tiffen ProMist is a popular option.

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    Re: Why Not Movie Film Filters?


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