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Thread: Fuji 90mm f8 SW or Nikon 90mm f8 SW

  1. #51

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    Re: Fuji 90mm f8 SW or Nikon 90mm f8 SW

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernice Loui View Post
    Once the lens and all related (film holders about 170 grams per 4x5 holder and more)
    are added up, focusing on reducing the weight of the camera alone is not a good idea as the other mandatory items that are a must to make LF
    images add up to more than just the camera.

    Lightweight camera outfit pays the price of stability. Specially outdoors when the wind blows, how to keep any lightweight camera stable/precise/accurate under these conditions. Add long shutter speeds and more, making lowest weight camera outfit into a big problem instead of a big advantage.
    I share that view.

    I don't hike/camp long distances, which may be why I'm not focused on saving every last ounce on camera and lens weight. I look first to keeping down the number of lenses and film holders I carry. I use a director's finder app for scouting, which means that I know in advance what lens or lenses I need.

    When it comes to tripods, I won't use anything lighter/less "solid" than a Gitzo Series 3 or equivalent, but I'll cut weight on the tripod head. The head in the photo in post #48, a Miller CX6, weighs 2.3kg (5lb). However, in many cases I'm happy to dispense with a tripod head altogether and use a levelling base. I sometimes use a Manfrotto Junior Geared Head for closeup/macro, but that's also a case where the lens is chosen in advance.

    I just like using a monorail camera with large aperture lenses. Makes life easier and photography a more enjoyable experience.
    Last edited by r.e.; 15-Oct-2021 at 15:48.

  2. #52
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Fuji 90mm f8 SW or Nikon 90mm f8 SW

    Alan - just getting back to you. But Dan already gave the answer. Wide angle lens falloff is inherent, and doesn't care what kind of film you are using. But a higher contrast film like Velvia, or higher contrast development of a black and white film, will make the problem more apparent. Whether or not it's tolerable, or requires the center filter, is up to you. But I would suggest that if you do use strong front movements for sake of a particular shot, that center filter might end up highly appreciated, especially if the scene is relatively high contrast to begin with. There's not a lot of forgiveness in that respect when using Velvia.

  3. #53
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Re: Fuji 90mm f8 SW or Nikon 90mm f8 SW

    Got it. There's no uneven look and falloff with movements as long as you use the CF.

  4. #54
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Fuji 90mm f8 SW or Nikon 90mm f8 SW

    Right. The correct center filter (which you have) used reasonably stopped down (about f/16 down in your case, using the Nikkor 90/4.5), will be even across the entire usable or specified circle of illumination, which is quite large.

  5. #55

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    Re: Fuji 90mm f8 SW or Nikon 90mm f8 SW

    I just noticed that @Ben started another thread three days after this one about what camera to get, presumably to use with this 90mm lens. His question in that thread makes it clear that cost is a major consideration:

    "I've looked at Wista 45, Toyo 45 and the Intrepid 3d-printed black edition. Both Wista and Toyo seem to retail used for about $300 used in good condition. The Intrepid 3d-printed black edition is over $400 new.

    "- What is your preference of the three models?

    "- Are there any 4x5 field cameras that sell for even less than these?"

    When they were being sold new, the Fuji SW f/8 and the Nikkor SW f/8 were the two cheapest 90mm lenses, at US$795 and $840 respectively. Of the 90mm lenses, for a given condition they should also be the cheapest when purchased used. As between a used Fuji and a used Nikkor in equal condition, it makes sense, as others have said, to purchase the least expensive. If there's a desire to use screw-in filters, these lenses also take 67mm filters, which are somewhat less expensive than the 82mm filters required for some other 90mm lens options.*

    @Ben hasn't said, in either thread, what he plans to use the camera and lens for. I assume that he wants to make rural or urban landscape photos, and maybe environmental portraits. For these subjects, camera movements aren't essential, but they provide more latitude for shot composition. They also make it possible to get perspective of buildings right in camera rather than correcting it in photo editing software. Consequently, it's useful to have a bellows that's flexible enough to use the camera's full range of movements with a 90mm lens. A standard bellows can be quite limiting. I would want to choose a camera that can accommodate a bag bellows, although a bag bellows would add to cost. All that said, there's no shortage of people making good landscape photos and environmental portraits with cameras that have no movements at all.

    Every 90mm lens will result in light falloff toward the corners. This can be addressed with a centre filter. However, centre filters are expensive and come with an exposure penalty. To keep cost down, I'd use negative film, keep falloff in mind during shot composition and address any falloff that I thought was undesirable (many people like the "look") when editing the photograph. My impression is that most large format photographers are not using a centre filter with their 90mm lens.


    * That said, I think that it's a good idea to standardise around a screw-in filter diameter, or go with the Lee 100 System or similar, from day 1. It will both simplify life and save money over time. On polarisers, a significant amount of money can be saved, especially when purchasing used, by choosing a linear rather than circular polariser for use with a film camera.
    Last edited by r.e.; 16-Oct-2021 at 12:44.

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