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Thread: Pyrocat HD - Differences/Effects between 1:1:100 and 2:2:100

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    Pyrocat HD - Differences/Effects between 1:1:100 and 2:2:100

    I shoot FP4+ and contact print from the in-camera negative using Pt/Pd. I have traditionally developed my film using the 2:2:100 dilution because I thought the benefit of the 1:1:100 dilution was primarily to increase film speed (a notion I took from Sandy King's article - https://www.sandykingphotography.com...ing-developers), which really isn't an issue for me. Are there other reasons or benefits that I should consider about the more dilute form of developer?

    Thanks in advance for all thoughts and suggestions.

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    Re: Pyrocat HD - Differences/Effects between 1:1:100 and 2:2:100

    I use it at 2:2:100 also. But I use it to shorten my otherwise long development times (reduces oxidation in rotary processing.)

    I believe increasing the Part B only will increase staining, but too much will also increase base fog (via staining).
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

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    Re: Pyrocat HD - Differences/Effects between 1:1:100 and 2:2:100

    I use it at 2:2:100 for pt/pd printing and for use on silver chloride papers such as Lodima or Adox Lupex; 1:1:100 for everything else. I've never tried it myself, but I'd guess that 2:2:100 densities could be obtained with the standard dilution, if you develop for long enough. Also, FWIW, I've never measured any increase in film speed with either dilution.

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    Re: Pyrocat HD - Differences/Effects between 1:1:100 and 2:2:100

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan9940 View Post
    I'd guess that 2:2:100 densities could be obtained with the standard dilution, if you develop for long enough.
    This is my sense as well, but given that my development times are currently around 8-9 minutes, I didn't think that was something that I needed to investigate for my setup. Interesting that you don't see an increase in film speed.

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    Re: Pyrocat HD - Differences/Effects between 1:1:100 and 2:2:100

    Quote Originally Posted by MarsZhukov View Post
    Interesting that you don't see an increase in film speed.
    Please allow me to be clear with this point... I, personally, and on my calibrated densitometer have never measured a true increase in film speed with any film/developer combo I've used. Have I tried 'em all? No. Others claim an increase in film speed, but even when I've tried their combinations I still don't see it. YMMV, of course.

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    Re: Pyrocat HD - Differences/Effects between 1:1:100 and 2:2:100

    I agree with Alan. I have not found a developer which increases the film speed set by the manufacturer. I usually choose to expose at a lower number , that is give it more light. But this is not a lower ISO/ASA, it is a personal exposure index. Likewise exposure at a higher EI does not mean the film speed has been increased,

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    Re: Pyrocat HD - Differences/Effects between 1:1:100 and 2:2:100

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    I agree with Alan. I have not found a developer which increases the film speed set by the manufacturer. I usually choose to expose at a lower number , that is give it more light. But this is not a lower ISO/ASA, it is a personal exposure index.
    As do I and my understanding is similar - the film speed (i.e. the properties of the chemical emulsion) has quite obviously not changed, the personal EI for your gear/your setup has. Again, I do not have any need to recover film speed so wasn't interested in this aspect of the 1:1:100 solution.

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    Re: Pyrocat HD - Differences/Effects between 1:1:100 and 2:2:100

    2:2:100 was initially suggested for Rotary development with shorter time. Others now use it to shorten development time even when using tray/tank development. Some of us even use it more dilute and process for longer with fewer agitations which gives some control over expansion/contraction and possibly acutance. It also depends how you scan/print. And what will you do if your times are short and you need to contract the negative? Pyrocat developers really allow you some dilution and time flexibility once you get to know them. HD is not the only version.
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    Re: Pyrocat HD - Differences/Effects between 1:1:100 and 2:2:100

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan9940 View Post
    I use it at 2:2:100 for pt/pd printing and for use on silver chloride papers such as Lodima or Adox Lupex; 1:1:100 for everything else. I've never tried it myself, but I'd guess that 2:2:100 densities could be obtained with the standard dilution, if you develop for long enough. Also, FWIW, I've never measured any increase in film speed with either dilution.
    What might your typical times be for 2:2:100 for Lodima, Lupex, pt/pd, vs 1:1:100 for everything else (enlargements)?

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    Re: Pyrocat HD - Differences/Effects between 1:1:100 and 2:2:100

    Quote Originally Posted by Carl J View Post
    What might your typical times be for 2:2:100 for Lodima, Lupex, pt/pd, vs 1:1:100 for everything else (enlargements)?
    It varies, of course, by film and development technique, but, for example, for 8x10 Foma 100 I develop with tanks & hangers for 15 mins @21C (1:1:100) for normal silver printing, and for roughly the same time (maybe, 14 mins) at 2:2:100 for pt/pd or silver chloride printing. Agitation is continuous for the first minute followed by 1 "cycle" at the 3/4, 1/2, and 1/4 marks. A "cycle" of agitation is: up/right/down, up/left/down, straight up and when the hanger gets near the top of the tank I drop it to dislodge any bubbles. Since I do all this with IR goggles, I can stop development at any point if the neg looks right; somewhat DBI, but mostly based on time.

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