Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Munewca Cameras

  1. #1
    rank beginner
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    39

    Munewca Cameras

    Anyone have any experience with Munewca cameras? Or information about them?

    The website (munewca.com) has an intriguing video, on what appears to be an 8x10 (or larger) and the classifieds here currently list a 5x7 of theirs. But I've never heard of the company before and wonder what sort of reputation they have.

  2. #2

    Re: Munewca Cameras

    They are a (sort of) newly-emerged Chinese large format camera manufacturer. Reading from this post :https://www.wuji.world/thread/1723244 it seems that they/he (the founder of Munewca cameras) started business in ~2017. Heard from one of my friends that Munewca has a good reputation in China, and the building quality is quite good.

    One thing that confuses me quite a bit is that the cameras listed on their website does not match what I can find on taobao (you can simply view taobao as eBay in China). From the information on taobao, it seems that they are selling:
    4x5 Travel version -- 3900 CNY
    4x5 Master version -- 6800 CNY
    5x7 Master version A -- 12800 CNY
    5x7 Master version B -- 10800 CNY
    8x10 Travel version -- 8800 CNY
    8x10 Classic version A -- 13800 CNY
    8x10 Classic version B -- 14800 CNY
    11x14 version A "three part" -- 26800 CNY (my guess is that "three part" means that the rail has 3 extensions, or 2 considering one part might stay on the bottom board of the camera)
    11x14 version B "four part" -- 28600 CNY.

    I have never used a Munewca camera before. Having just moved back to China, my 8x10 camera got damaged during transportation (ground glass shattered, focusing button broken, etc.). I just placed an order on a 8x10 classic version B, and if people are interested I can post some photos once I receive it. I am a newbee though, so I might not be able to give proper evaluation on functionalities, build qualities, etc.

    BTW, here is a description page for their 8x10 version B camera: https://item.taobao.com/item.htm?id=648128798947 , some photos are posted there by the seller.
    A rough translation on the specs:
    Lenses that can be used: 65mm to 700mm (the seller claims that the camera is designed considering that customers might want to put a 4x5 back on it and use wide angles)
    Front tilt: 15 degree (lens axis); >60 degree (front bracket axis)
    Front swing: 30 degree (both left and right)
    Front shift: 45mm (left and right); >50mm (up); >30mm (down)
    Rear tilt: >15 degree
    Rear swing: 15 degree
    Oh and it uses Sinar boards.

  3. #3
    rank beginner
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    39

    Re: Munewca Cameras

    Thanks for taking the time to put together a very thorough summary. The company appears to be virtually unknown here. Which is odd, considering what they offer.

    I, for one, would be interested in seeing photos of the 8 x 10.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    332

    Re: Munewca Cameras

    JacksonTB, thanks for the information, do you have any images or links to images of the two 4x5 cameras, namely the travel version and the master version?

    There is a huge price difference between the two, so I'm wondering if the travel version is a folder unit while the master version may possibly be a monorail type, but I'm not too sure about that.

    Mick.

  5. #5

    Re: Munewca Cameras

    The camera arrived last Sunday (just placed the order the day before) and I was quite satisfied with the camera, considering the build quality, the format and the price. The camera came in a well-packed wooden box and playing with it a little bit I think it is well worth the money. The first time I heard about them was either earlier this year or late last year -- before that I was also not aware of this company -- quite new business I guess?

    Here are some of the out-of-the-box photos I took. As my wife would have killed me if she had known that I bought a new camera, the earliest I can use this camera to shoot photos might be after half a month (so I cannot have detailed comments on if it is very easy to use, etc.) -- all comments below are first-sight comments.

    1). Apparently I messed up when uploading images. The attached thumbnail shows the camera inside of the box.

    2). The camera, fully unfolded. The way this camera folds reminded me of Wista 8x10 DX. The upper buttons on the front bracket are for tilt and shift (up/down). The two buttons vertical to the front bottom are for swing and shift (left/right) -- but I guess you all already know these LOL
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	WeChat Image_20210921082658.jpg 
Views:	77 
Size:	53.2 KB 
ID:	219793

    3. The camera, viewed from side
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	WeChat Image_20210921082651.jpg 
Views:	73 
Size:	59.7 KB 
ID:	219794

    4. The camera at a position that is close to minimum bellow extension. The buttons on the side of the bottom plate of the camera is for quick focusing I think -- loosen it so the back could be moved back and forth really quickly for quickly adjusting focus. The knob at the back of the camera (just figured out that I forgot to take photos of the back of the camera) is used to adjust focus in a more subtle way. I have not tried if I can focus a 90mm or 110mm wide angle with this camera easily, but once I can take it out and shoot some pictures I will know.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	WeChat Image_20210921082646.jpg 
Views:	57 
Size:	59.7 KB 
ID:	219795

    Guess I'd better give comments on the build quality and easy-to-useness on this camera after I do some real shooting with it, but for the moment I think the build quality is quite good and it feels easy to use (at least I do not need to turn the focusing knob crazily after I switch from a 240 mm to a 360 mm).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails WeChat Image_20210921082655.jpg  

  6. #6

    Re: Munewca Cameras

    Hi Mick, I found this video online: https://www.bilibili.com/s/video/BV1U54118736 . It's a comparison between a Linhof Technikardan 23 and a Munewca 4x5 camera (looks like a classic version -- not listed on my previous post but it shows up on a catalogue I found. Looks like all units are folder units, and I will post that catalogue below:
    Attachment 219796

    Top row are the travel versions, mid row classic versions and bottom row are the master versions.

    Translation of the right part (description of each version)
    Traveler versions:
    Two-part design, gear rack front focus. The camera has front tilt, swing and shift (both up/down and left/right), and rear tilt. The rear group can be moved quickly forward for quick focusing, and also allowing ease of shifting when using wide angle lenses. Stainless steel and teak wood.
    These cameras feature in being small and lightweight, and stability. It is cost-effective and suited for traveling and landscape photography.

    Classic versions:
    Three-part design, gear rack front and rear focus. The camera has front tilt, swing and shift (both up/down and left/right), and rear tilt and swing. The camera can support lenses from wide angle to mid-long focal lengths. Aluminum alloy 7075, teak wood and black walnut wood.
    These cameras feature in being lightweight and in universality. It is suited for landscape, still life, architecture and indoor portrait photography.

    Master versions:
    Four-part design, gear rack front and rear focus. The camera has both front and rear tilt, swing and shift (both up/down and left/right). The camera can support lenses from wide angle to long focal lengths. Aluminum alloy 7075, teak wood and black walnut wood.
    These cameras feature in modular designs, and are equipped with "Munewca quick focusing system", "Munewca variable format system", and an asymmetrical adjustment system. They can easily be switched to other formats, so that photographers can achieve "one camera, multiple formats" with them. (The words here are blocked by the logo of the seller from which I found the catalogue, so the translation is rough and might not be correct. It seems that they are advertising that these Master version cameras can use formats that are larger than they are first designed for -- probably a 5x7 back on a 4x5 camera? But I am not sure because I really cannot read through the logos.)

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Newbury, Vermont
    Posts
    1,330

    Re: Munewca Cameras

    From the video I'd say thats a 5x7. Looks very versatile and flexible in terms of available movements.

    I'd be very curious about how this camera might facilitate "fine tuning" of movements while in use, and whether or not the various movement locking mechanisms and their associated frictional interfaces allow for a degree of partial tightening, permitting a degree of smooth yet decisive fine tuning of movements before a final tightening down to actual lock.

    For example...lets say you are in the process of adjusting a forward axial tilt of the lens panel. Ideally (IMHO) one should be able to partially tighten this movement...so that it stays put and yet, with slight finger pressure, remains adjustable in concert with further adjustments to focus - prior to a final locking down of both tilt and focus.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    332

    Re: Munewca Cameras

    Jackson, thanks for the links and the pictures of your new camera, or should that be the new old camera?

    The video link was quite interesting, even though I couldn't understand anything, but the images and their fiddling showed pretty much all one needs to know.

    John Layton, I too thought it was a 5x7 camera at first, until they finally let us see the ground glass. The GG is divided with a grid, and unless the Chinese are silly, which they aren't, those grid lines are in 1cm increments. Freeze framing then counting the squares, show that it is indeed a 4x5" camera. Albeit quite a wide bodied type, but compared to the Linhof, anything is wider.

    Mick.

  9. #9

    Re: Munewca Cameras

    The title of that video said it is a 4x5 -- that's why I said it is a 4x5 camera in the first place. I did not notice the size or the ground glass of the camera, but I'd better do check them the next time!

    I have been busy in my lab for a while, and was just able to play with the camera a bit more. I mounted a Kodak Portrait 12in on the camera, and here is what I found:

    Front: Lens axis and bracket axis tilt have these "fine tuning". For shifting up/downward you have to tighten the knobs (there is friction, but gravity still wins). Front swing and shifting left/right are controlled by two knobs -- there is sort of a "fine tuning" (because there is no gravity involved), but the friction is sort of rough (not as smooth as the tilts)

    Back: For tilt there is the "fine tuning", and for swing, since gravity is not involved, there is the fine tuning. Back swing feels smoother than front swing.


    LOL give me a month without having to take care of my kid and having to go to lab every day, this new camera will soon be my new old camera! The homecoming day of my school is next week, and I am actually thinking about taking this camera and give it a shot -- hopefully my bag and my back are both sturdy enough!

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 20-Dec-2019, 06:39
  2. Luxurious Cameras vs. Plain Jane Cameras and your Camera of Choice!
    By audioexcels in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 86
    Last Post: 29-Feb-2012, 23:12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •