Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 41 to 48 of 48

Thread: They say to start with 4x5, but...

  1. #41

    Join Date
    Jul 2021
    Posts
    17

    Re: They say to start with 4x5, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kasaian View Post
    If you want to shoot 8x10 stop being a Nancy about it and shoot 8x10.
    Life is too short to futz around.
    It's only $$
    If it's what makes you happy you'll only wonder why it took you so long to grab the ball and run with it.
    You're ruining my foreplay.

  2. #42
    Foamer
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    2,279

    Re: They say to start with 4x5, but...

    The best advice so far is to have someone send you a well done 8x10 neg and see what can be done with it. I have an Epson scanner and know it's nowhere near up to what you want. You'll need a very high res drum scan. If it were me doing this I'd go for a digital medium format camera with something like a Leaf Aptus back and Zeiss lenses.



    Kent in SD
    Qui sedes ad dexteram Patris,
    miserere nobis.

  3. #43

    Join Date
    Jul 2021
    Posts
    17

    Re: They say to start with 4x5, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by Two23 View Post
    The best advice so far is to have someone send you a well done 8x10 neg and see what can be done with it. I have an Epson scanner and know it's nowhere near up to what you want. You'll need a very high res drum scan. If it were me doing this I'd go for a digital medium format camera with something like a Leaf Aptus back and Zeiss lenses.



    Kent in SD
    I just sold my GFX100

    But I think you're right, I'm going to get in touch with some of the few remaining drum scanners out there and see if they have some demo files they can send me.

  4. #44

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    195

    Re: They say to start with 4x5, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by jdk View Post
    I did consider 617 as an alternative. The Fuji GX617s are very cool, compact, and the benefits of roll film are obvious. But print size is the issue, which is why I started looking at 4x10 as essentially 6x17 on steroids. I get two shots out of an 8x10 sheet, and the camera size and weight is far more manageable than 8x10. Once I started down that path, the only question was whether to start out with 4x5 in accordance with conventional wisdom or just jump in and go for it. Turns out conventional wisdom may have shifted.
    I hadn’t read the thread on onlandscape when I posted about 612 and roll films.
    Based on that thread, if a Mamiya 7 can trounce the iq80 then one would think 612 has plenty of potential for huge enlargement.

    I would definitely give roll film a chance before going into 8x10.
    I’ve read all your comments that you’re not afraid of the weight or the cost, but I also know from experience that going from a small digicam such as your gfx to a large view camera makes a huge difference in the field. It’s easy to underestimate that difference until you’ve tried it.

    I can try to digitise the center of a 612 neg to the point that film grain becomes detrimental, and send that file to you.
    Then you could print that file at A3 and compare the detail to your 8ft prints.

    Also at the risk of repeating myself, do not discard my suggestion of shooting 4x8 panoramas on two sheets of 45 via rear shift. (The Chamonix 45H-1 has enough rear shift to do this.)
    It would give you the same enlargements as 4x10 on a much more practical sheet format.
    Keep in mind that your lab and drum scanner operator will still charge you the price of 8x10 to process and scan your 410 slides…
    "I am a reflection photographing other reflections within a reflection. To photograph reality is to photograph nothing." Duane Michals

  5. #45

    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    125

    Re: They say to start with 4x5, but...

    jdk,

    I understand you want to limit your wasted effort in buying the wrong camera system, but you haven't mentioned where you are located. Are there any rental options in your area? Is there anybody shooting 8x10 in your circle of friends? Or region? If you were in my area, I'd suggest getting together and shooting together for a day.

    It's hard to explain how different each camera/format is to work with. 4x5 is different from 4x10, 5x7, 8x10 or 8x20. Each format brings different problems and rewards. Sometimes there is no better way of learning than just doing. It has been suggested, buy something and shoot with it. I agree. Working with a camera is the only way to find out if a format. But be careful, the wrong camera can turn you off of a format also.

    The best advise I ever received was to buy an affordable used camera and give a new format a try. If it's not for you sell the camera and move on. I did this with 4x5, 8x10 and also 8x20. I still shoot all three formats on upgraded cameras, and have sold off my first cameras for each format.
    _______________________
    George Losse
    www.georgelosse.com

  6. #46
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,481

    Re: They say to start with 4x5, but...

    With 6x12, the challenge is film flatness even more than with sheet film. I like my results, but my prints are not measured in many feet.

    Rick “theory may not meet practice because of film flatness” Denney

  7. #47

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    2,500

    Re: They say to start with 4x5, but...

    More than just film flatness, camera alignment, camera stability or movement of any kind become non-linear difficult as the sheet film size goes up.

    Stopping the lens down as the film format size goes up is NOT the proper cure. The actual cure is to assure film flatness in the film holder by adhesive, vacuum or other methods. Then there is the camera issue, front to rear standards to ground glass to film holder area MUST start out as parallel as possible (like 0.01" or better at each corner) before applying any camera movements and check for absolute focus with a proper magnifier (~7x) on the GG before the lens is stopped down and at lens taking aperture to. Then lens mounting and all related to the camera mechanics. Then comes keeping a BIG camera from moving in the real world of image making. This is one of the most often neglected then taken for granted aspects of view camera image making.

    Yes larger lens apertures are used for view camera work, it is a image making style thing.. More on this later, and yes some view camera lenses are have remarkable optical performance at full aperture.


    Bernice

  8. #48

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    1,083

    Re: They say to start with 4x5, but...

    Maybe try B&W and shoot glass plates?
    "My forumla for successful printing remains ordinary chemicals, an ordinary enlarger, music, a bottle of scotch - and stubbornness." W. Eugene Smith

Similar Threads

  1. Where to start? Is it too late to start? Beginner seeking advice.
    By strayblank in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 23-Mar-2018, 14:01
  2. Where to start? Is it too late to start? Beginner seeking advice.
    By senderoaburrido in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 73
    Last Post: 1-Nov-2015, 19:13
  3. New Start
    By Johhn D Castle in forum Introductions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 6-Oct-2007, 10:52
  4. If you had to start new...
    By Scott Knowles in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 30-Jan-2007, 17:24
  5. How Much to Start Out
    By Suk Jung Choo in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 30-Mar-2002, 08:32

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •