Page 4 of 13 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 129

Thread: Technique for focusing "into your scene"

  1. #31

    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Location
    Bundaberg, Australia
    Posts
    157

    Re: Technique for focusing "into your scene"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    Good tips, I also use, including tiny flashlights for corners

    In our Post-Reality Photo Art era, I am going to include my markers occasionally

    as they are Truth
    Yeah for dark images I've used a flashlight as well, works a treat. Dunno about leaving it in the shot though
    Rob Gray Nature Photographer Extraordinaire
    www.robgray.com

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    240

    Re: Technique for focusing "into your scene"

    I have a coach/teacher I like to use as well as this forum. One of the first things he said was, all 4 images were not a good candidates for using any kind of tilt. The simple reason is that the highest nearest object protruded up from the bottom of the image (top of the GG downward) by 20%. You can see in all 4 images I have that going on.

    This rule (and fact) pisses me off because everywhere I shoot I will have that problem!! After I complained about that for a while he just laughed at me. That made it worse.

    Fact is, I hate to admit it, but he's right. As a result of tilting, I caused areas in the middle to be soft.

    Anyway, he walked me through a lot of composition problems and made me answer a lot of hard questions that I didn't have any good answers for.

    No one in this forum told me this shit is hard!!!! LOL. Ok that's not true. But it's still fun and makes me really appreciate that this is a marathon and I'm on mile 7 (maybe).

    Thanks for the tips!!
    Anything in life worth having is worth sharing.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    645

    Re: Technique for focusing "into your scene"

    I told you to get the Stroebel book.

    One thing people often don’t get right when they are taught to tilt and swing - while tilts and swings are useful for changing the orientation of the plane of sharp focus, they decrease depth of field. When you tilt your front standard forward, your depth of field is now a wedge-shaped space extending forward from the camera.

    Quote Originally Posted by AdamD View Post
    I have a coach/teacher I like to use as well as this forum. One of the first things he said was, all 4 images were not a good candidates for using any kind of tilt. The simple reason is that the highest nearest object protruded up from the bottom of the image (top of the GG downward) by 20%. You can see in all 4 images I have that going on.

    This rule (and fact) pisses me off because everywhere I shoot I will have that problem!! After I complained about that for a while he just laughed at me. That made it worse.

    Fact is, I hate to admit it, but he's right. As a result of tilting, I caused areas in the middle to be soft.

    Anyway, he walked me through a lot of composition problems and made me answer a lot of hard questions that I didn't have any good answers for.

    No one in this forum told me this shit is hard!!!! LOL. Ok that's not true. But it's still fun and makes me really appreciate that this is a marathon and I'm on mile 7 (maybe).

    Thanks for the tips!!

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Sep 1998
    Location
    Oregon now (formerly Austria)
    Posts
    2,786

    Re: Technique for focusing "into your scene"

    Quote Originally Posted by AdamD View Post
    I have a coach/teacher I like to use as well as this forum. One of the first things he said was, all 4 images were not a good candidates for using any kind of tilt. The simple reason is that the highest nearest object protruded up from the bottom of the image (top of the GG downward) by 20%. ...
    I'm not so sure I agree with the "20%-rule." As I mentioned, I'd have certainly used some movements in the image I discussed. Besides, not all "foreground" objects are equal. If your foreground is really close, and you have a vertical object, then that does, indeed, limit the effectiveness of movements. However, if your "foreground" is 20 feet from your camera, then the situation is different.

    Also, I tend to use a bit of forward tilt in a lot of architectural shots, where "common wisdom" says that you don't use tilts at all. Often, I can save a whole stop's worth of depth of field.

    The proof of whether or not movements can more optimally place the plane of sharp focus is in the focus spread. If you can apply movements and reduce the focus spread between "near" and "far" points, then the movements are doing some good.

    If I'm in doubt as to whether movements are helping, that's what I do.

    BTW, the Leslie Stroebl book that Michael refers to is the Bible AFAIC. It takes some study time, but is well-worth the effort. That's how I learned.

    Best,

    Doremus

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    645

    Re: Technique for focusing "into your scene"

    Doremus, regarding your architecture/small forward tilt example, fun “possible factoid”, I have it on good authority Ansel Adams did this for the well known vertical aspens picture as the light had faded substantially by the time he had set up for it. Off topic but anyway.

    Michael

    Quote Originally Posted by Doremus Scudder View Post
    I'm not so sure I agree with the "20%-rule." As I mentioned, I'd have certainly used some movements in the image I discussed. Besides, not all "foreground" objects are equal. If your foreground is really close, and you have a vertical object, then that does, indeed, limit the effectiveness of movements. However, if your "foreground" is 20 feet from your camera, then the situation is different.

    Also, I tend to use a bit of forward tilt in a lot of architectural shots, where "common wisdom" says that you don't use tilts at all. Often, I can save a whole stop's worth of depth of field.

    The proof of whether or not movements can more optimally place the plane of sharp focus is in the focus spread. If you can apply movements and reduce the focus spread between "near" and "far" points, then the movements are doing some good.

    If I'm in doubt as to whether movements are helping, that's what I do.

    BTW, the Leslie Stroebl book that Michael refers to is the Bible AFAIC. It takes some study time, but is well-worth the effort. That's how I learned.

    Best,

    Doremus

  6. #36
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    15,168

    Re: Technique for focusing "into your scene"

    If I had to think through everything mentioned so far on this thread, it would appear the shortest distance between two points is a convoluted maze. Fortunately, that Stroebl book does include pictures. It ain't all that complicated after a bit of practice. ... And for the record, when I use view cameras, movements are involved about 98% of the time. They exist for a reason.

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    645

    Re: Technique for focusing "into your scene"

    I’m surprised you use movements nearly all the time for non-studio work, although I assume that includes rise/fall/shift. For my pictures I use those a lot, but rarely tilt/swing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Wiley View Post
    If I had to think through everything mentioned so far on this thread, it would appear the shortest distance between two points is a convoluted maze. Fortunately, that Stroebl book does include pictures. It ain't all that complicated after a bit of practice. ... And for the record, when I use view cameras, movements are involved about 98% of the time. They exist for a reason.

  8. #38
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    7,825

    Re: Technique for focusing "into your scene"

    I've been at this game for 25 years now. It's been many years since I last used any swing or tilt. The kinds of pictures I take have things sprouting all over the place, and the main effect of applying non-parallel movements is to introduce distracting focus artifacts.

    I think the emphasis on movements as the hallmark of large format photography is unfortunate and a disservice to beginners. They are not a general solution to depth-of-field problems; they're a specialized tool for specialized situations.

  9. #39

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Newbury, Vermont
    Posts
    1,250

    Re: Technique for focusing "into your scene"

    Not with emphasis...but to see it as part of the whole - that movements are but one of our many tools which, when used intelligently, thoughtfully, and with intention...can be great allies in helping us to get to the heart of what moves us. No more, no less.

  10. #40

    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    240

    Cool Re: Technique for focusing "into your scene"

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R View Post
    I told you to get the Stroebel book
    Michael R, I bought the book.
    Anything in life worth having is worth sharing.

Similar Threads

  1. technique to get the "Karsh, Hurrell" look from sharp lenses??
    By stradibarrius in forum Lenses & Lens Accessories
    Replies: 63
    Last Post: 10-Nov-2017, 13:32
  2. Replies: 21
    Last Post: 6-Nov-2010, 07:02
  3. Jobo Lift and Big Tanks: "Jaw Thrust" technique...
    By ic-racer in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 14-May-2010, 11:48

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •