Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: What is the "object" in this lens?

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    17

    What is the "object" in this lens?

    New to this Forum and I have very limited camera smarts. I'm still working my way through this large vintage camera collection I 'inherited" and I came across this huge lens that says it is a "Wollensak 15 inch 5.6 Telephoto". From what I have read, it normally goes on a a Graflex camera? There is a Graflex 4x5 Pacemaker Speed Graphic Camera in the collection so that would make sense why I found it tucked away in a box - unlike the other lenses that seem to be well protected in cases, etc. This one seems a bit rough compared to the other lenses and cameras (35mm, medium and large format) in the collection.

    I haven't seen other similar lenses with the male threads below the upper rim that the big round "hood" screws on to? And what is that angular metal piece attached to the shutter adjustment? And now for my central question - what is the "flower" looking thing on the inside of the lens? I'm thinking that can't be good? And this lens body has a matte finish - military application? So many questions! I'm trying to sell all these pieces so any information would be greatly appreciated! Not sure why/how the photos were turned sideways? I'm about as handy with computers as I am cameras! Thanks in advance - Mark
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 900-275 (1).jpg   900-275 (9).jpg   900-275 (12).jpg   900-275 (11).jpg  

  2. #2

    Re: What is the "object" in this lens?

    The "flower" is cement failure... not good, but may not be bad (for use) either.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    1,813

    Re: What is the "object" in this lens?

    That's a relatively common lens for Speed Graphics, but it also had some military uses that I don't specifically know. The board it's mounted on, however, is for some special piece of equipment, an aerial camera or something, and the extension arm on the aperture is probably linkage to a remote adjustment of some sort. The external thread is part of that whole package. Here's an example of that use, and you can see how the aperture linkage is necessary: https://www.nomadicfrog.com/2011/12/...l-recon-camera

    I suspect that the owner bought the lens with the idea of quite legitimately fitting it to his Speed Graphic, but never got around to it.

    In normal situations that small amount of glue separation won't necessarily affect anything, though it could cause trouble with backlighting. I bet if you look in from the back, in normal light, you won't even see the star. Nevertheless, these lenses are so cheap and common that I wouldn't buy this one. Looking at sold items on Ebay, I found three sold in the last few months for $45, $85, and $100.

    All that said, it's an excellent lens (and I have five or six of them, mounted for different cameras.) It is also available in a shutter, often for under $200. The front component, alone, makes a dandy soft-focus lens of around 180-190mm, f/2.8 used in front, or f/5.6 with a completely different look if flipped around to the back position.

    When searching Ebay, both the Wollensak tele-Raptar and Graflex tele-Optar are the same lens, and there's a zillion different ways you find them listed on Ebay, as 15", 380mm, and 381mm.
    Thanks, but I'd rather just watch:
    Large format: http://flickr.com/michaeldarnton
    Mostly 35mm: http://flickr.com/mdarnton
    You want digital, color, etc?: http://www.flickr.com/photos/stradofear

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,620

    Re: What is the "object" in this lens?

    I assume the extra piece of metal is to make adjustment of the iris easier.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    17

    Re: What is the "object" in this lens?

    Thank you for the input. This has certainly been an educational adventure! I'm sure I'll have more questions on the journey. On a different topic - how do I find the sell/buy forum on this site? I can't seem to find it. Mark

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    6,082

    Re: What is the "object" in this lens?

    The two commercial threads appear after 4 weeks membership!

    I would not describe this as separation. It is a bit like a snowflake developing in clouds. The balsam/glue is sort of “crystallizing” out of the balsam forming a fern like substance that has slightly different optical characteristics than the original balsam/glue.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    17

    Re: What is the "object" in this lens?

    Thank you for your input on what this is in/on the lens. And thanks also for the answer to my buy/sell question. I joined back in November so I was wondering how it worked. I can now see the buy/sell section. I'll probably put a few pieces on and see what happens.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    102

    Re: What is the "object" in this lens?

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Tribe View Post
    The two commercial threads appear after 4 weeks membership!

    I would not describe this as separation. It is a bit like a snowflake developing in clouds. The balsam/glue is sort of “crystallizing” out of the balsam forming a fern like substance that has slightly different optical characteristics than the original balsam/glue.
    no, it's just separation.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    6,082

    Re: What is the "object" in this lens?

    Quote Originally Posted by maltfalc View Post
    no, it's just separation.
    Maltfalc!

    Of course, it’s not separation. Separation means the existence of two or more distinct parts or approaches to separation when there is reduced bonding between two glass surfaces.

    For modern UV glues, this can come without warning . Heat shock, vibration combined with advanced age ( of the lens - not the user!) can be the reason. There is often a common pre condition of visible interference (Newton’s rings) and it often shows remission at this stage.

    Natural Canada Balsam tends to yellow ( and sometimes, brown) especially in contact with air. The edges are almost always the first to show this.This yellow/opaqueness conceals a deposition of a whitish cement solid material on the glass surfaces combined with the formation of air pockets. In really exceptional cases, the lenses can fall apart from each other, but usually the white deposit takes over the bonding!

    The OP’s “problem” will not lead to separation!

Similar Threads

  1. DIFF? "Fast" vs "Slow" lens at Small Apertures?
    By Mr_Toad in forum Lenses & Lens Accessories
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 1-Nov-2011, 04:50

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •