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Thread: T-Max and D76

  1. #1

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    T-Max and D76

    I just found this interesting -

    I use D76 for many films - at 1:1 - as a one shot use

    I shot some 4x5 T-Max for the first time yesterday - as well as some Ilford FP4 + -

    I developed the Ilford with it at 1:1 as before - turned out fine

    then I looked at the data sheet for D-76 to confirm the time FOR T-Max- and was surprised to see that although the roll film chart gives a time for 1:1
    the sheet film chart only gives a time for full strength -
    not a problem - i can do it and keep track of the number of sheets I've used it for

    but I am curious if any of the folks with more scientific minds than mine can say why its only full strength for sheet film

    thanks

  2. #2
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: T-Max and D76

    Ignore that. It works just fine at 1:1. The real problem is that you need to standardize on either using 76 freshly mixed, or else wait about a week for it to reach pH equilibrium after mixing, and then use it up all up within a few months in that particular state. For the longer-term version of usage, divide the full stock volume into full air-tight smaller glass bottles, each sufficient for one-time usage when diluted. But different concentrations (1:1 vs 1:2 vs 1:3) might yield slightly different curve shapes. 76 won't give you a true straight-line midsection anyway, but a slight sag into a slightly lengthened toe. This film is amendable to all kinds of common developers and various gamma contrast targets. TMax will still give you a steeper toe with deeper shadow gradation than FP4, but in turn, requires more careful shadow placement metering.

    For the straightest line, Kodak originally recommended TMRS developer full-strength. That was apparently in conjunction with its potential use as a color separation film, since TMX100 was originally engineered to replace several other films, including Super XX, which was the previous product of choice for color separations. But that's an uncommon application nowadays; and TMRS developer is no longer being made (not to be confused with regular TMax developer). HC-110 is more convenient anyway, if one needs a somewhat ironed out midsection to the curve. But for pictorial use, many of us prefer staining pyro developers instead, which make the highlights much easier to print than 76 does.

  3. #3

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    Re: T-Max and D76

    Drew mentioned the activity. Ilford ID11 is their version of D76 and from what I understand does not have the gain in activity after mixing.
    "My forumla for successful printing remains ordinary chemicals, an ordinary enlarger, music, a bottle of scotch - and stubbornness." W. Eugene Smith

  4. #4
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: T-Max and D76

    There is also a buffered version of 76 available from Photographer's Formulary that stays consistent.

  5. #5

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    Re: T-Max and D76

    Press photographers want to get their film developed in less than 13 minutes 30 seconds, so they use D-76 full strength. The large format photographers do not need the "fine grain" results that 35mm photographers need so stock is just fine.

  6. #6
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: T-Max and D76

    Undiluted stock strength is just fine if you're willing to spend twice as much on this particular developer than you need to; 1:1 also works well for sheet film. But press photographers who want film developed at all are probably almost extinct. Perhaps the past tense, "wanted", would be more appropriate. Now press photography is more about beating the competition by pressing the send button faster than the other guy.

  7. #7

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    Re: T-Max and D76

    thanks all

    I have used the 1:1 for Ilford and other films - I figured it was not an issue for the t-Max sheets as well

    I've used it on roll film for decades - so its what I have around - well - until this weekend

    I went to mix up a new batch, but the powder came out brown- turns out, based on a quick search, all the D76 I have on hand is from a known bad batch

  8. #8

    Re: T-Max and D76

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick L View Post
    I went to mix up a new batch, but the powder came out brown- turns out, based on a quick search, all the D76 I have on hand is from a known bad batch
    After purchasing bad batches of Xtol twice, bad Dektol and bad D-76 in the past 18 months, I am not buying Kodak chemistry for the foreseeable future. (Remember, Kodak promised replacement Xtol by Mid-February, and I don't think any of us has received replacement product yet) Instead, I am buying components from ArtCraft Chemicals and making developers from scratch here at home. D-76 is ridiculously easy to make from scratch.

  9. #9
    http://www.spiritsofsilver.com tgtaylor's Avatar
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    Re: T-Max and D76

    Rick,

    Just compare the times given for Xtol and D-76 in the tech pub: For Rotary tubes for example it gives the time for full strength Xtol (@ 68F) as 7.25 minutes and D-76 at 6.25 minutes. So full strength D-76 requires 1 less minute in the developer. Now look at what it says for Xtol 1:1 - 9.75 Minutes. Simply substract 1 minute for D-76 - 8.75 minutes at 68F for your time. I do this all the time when using films like Fuji that only give full strength times for Xtol.

    Thomas

  10. #10

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    Re: T-Max and D76

    Quote Originally Posted by paulbarden View Post
    After purchasing bad batches of Xtol twice, bad Dektol and bad D-76 in the past 18 months, I am not buying Kodak chemistry for the foreseeable future. (Remember, Kodak promised replacement Xtol by Mid-February, and I don't think any of us has received replacement product yet) Instead, I am buying components from ArtCraft Chemicals and making developers from scratch here at home. D-76 is ridiculously easy to make from scratch.
    I have been thinking about that, the recipes are out there

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