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Thread: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

  1. #21

    Join Date
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    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    I treat the plates the same way I do Ortho films. If the UV is low, I add exposure. If high, like a bright clear day between 10 AM and 2 PM I can usually use Box Speed.
    I grew up with orthochromatic films prior to the domination of panchromatic films so this method comes naturally to me,

  2. #22

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    Apr 2016
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    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    Thanks. This makes sense and calls for further experimenting.

  3. #23
    Nodda Duma's Avatar
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    Nov 2014
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    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    Quote Originally Posted by ernie57 View Post
    I’m only into my first box of plates, so I expect to be fighting the learning curve. I shot some plates last week, outside, middle of the day near the ocean. Held a blue #47 filter over the meter with ISO (I still like ASA better) 100. These plates came out properly exposed. The 2nd outing, I was shooting cars, in the sun, middle of the day, and used the same metering technique, but everything came out very thin. Thin to the point of unusable. The thin ones are drying right now, or I would put up a scan. What is the difference in why I got such thin plates the 2nd outing? Thanks.
    If it’s from the same box then I’d check for problems elsewhere: Lens settings, developer exhaustion, etc. The plates are very consistent. Metering thru the filter would address UV variations.

    Outdoors under the conditions you describe, you can ditch the blue filter and just spot meter on a gray card at ASA 25. That speed is calibrated to mid-March northerly lighting clear sky conditions at my latitude in NH.
    Newly made large format dry plates available! Look:
    https://www.pictoriographica.com

  4. #24

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    Apr 2016
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    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    No doubt it was operator error. I’m not questioning the plates. I will be shooting more exotic vehicles on Sat. I will try metering with no filter @ ISO 25. Is the blue filter suggested for cloudy skies? What will happen to the amount of blue light in the SoCal area as we move into summer? I looked at the chart on your website and don’t fully understand what I am looking at. Thanks -

  5. #25

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    Apr 2016
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    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    I am still having a hard time getting exposures correct. I shot my first box and only got 1 useable plate. I used fresh HC110 dilution B each tim. I also metered with and without the blue filter and they all came out really thin. What am I doing wrong? I have another box of speed plates and will keep trying until I figure this out.

  6. #26
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Dec 2011
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    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    Donít use a meter

    Learn Sunny 16 and bellows factor
    image

  7. #27

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    Apr 2016
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    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    Donít use a meter

    Learn Sunny 16 and bellows factor
    Ok. How does bellows factor come into play on a Speed Graphic with plates? I pay no mind to it with film and get proper exposures. My plates are coming out at least 5 stops underexposed. I have been metering at box speed (ISO 25) and at 100 and holding a blue filter over the dome on the incident meter. Thanks

  8. #28

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    Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    Quote Originally Posted by ernie57 View Post
    Ok. How does bellows factor come into play on a Speed Graphic with plates? I pay no mind to it with film and get proper exposures. My plates are coming out at least 5 stops underexposed. I have been metering at box speed (ISO 25) and at 100 and holding a blue filter over the dome on the incident meter. Thanks
    Iíd suggest you spend a plate where you point to a uniformly lit subject, even a wall, and make 4 exposures by sliding the dark slide in 1/4ís covering a range of 4 stops around where you think it should be (in other words if you already know itís off by 5 or more stops from box speed then start 2-3 stops more exposure). Use the same time of the day you will likely shoot, approximately.

    That said 5 stops is a lot. There has to be something else wrong here. If you swap the plate for film, do you expose correctly or do you get consistent under exposures?

    I mentioned earlier that indoors with tungsten or LED I need to adjust the exposure by +2.5 stops, but outdoors during mid day is 0 to 1.5 depending on cloud coverage and time of the year. Itís all by experimentation, there isnít one size fits all.

    But try using one plate in chunks as I said to limit the waste of plates.

  9. #29

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    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi7475 View Post
    Iíd suggest you spend a plate where you point to a uniformly lit subject, even a wall, and make 4 exposures by sliding the dark slide in 1/4ís covering a range of 4 stops around where you think it should be (in other words if you already know itís off by 5 or more stops from box speed then start 2-3 stops more exposure). Use the same time of the day you will likely shoot, approximately.

    That said 5 stops is a lot. There has to be something else wrong here. If you swap the plate for film, do you expose correctly or do you get consistent under exposures?

    I mentioned earlier that indoors with tungsten or LED I need to adjust the exposure by +2.5 stops, but outdoors during mid day is 0 to 1.5 depending on cloud coverage and time of the year. Itís all by experimentation, there isnít one size fits all.

    But try using one plate in chunks as I said to limit the waste of plates.
    Thanks. As soon as the sun comes out, I will try this today. I found a vid on YT by Lund Photographic on this same technique for determining exposure for tintypes. My Tmax 100 comes out properly exposed. Iím still learning how the plates work.

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