Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 29

Thread: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    288

    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nodda Duma View Post
    No that’s for the ASA 2 plates.

    Blue 47 filter blocks (approximately) the wavelengths the emulsion doesn’t see, but also chops down the throughput in the wavelengths the emulsion does see, so you adjust your meter two stops up to compensate (remember, ISO setting on the meter is just an electronic gain adjust for the read circuit).

    When metering thru a blue 47 filter with J Lane Speed Plates, you’d set ISO rating to 100 and use the reported exposure.

    Another way to think of it is...If you don’t compensate +2 stops, then metering through a blue 47 filter will result in +2 stop overexposure.
    I think I got that. I had to sit and re-read that a few times Alas I don't have a real Blue 47. Just a set of colored generic filters I was going to use for some trichrome stuff . I bought those in part because finding blue filters has been rather difficult/expensive though I do now see there are some available from various places. So yep I might have to pick up a proper one - seems like that would make metering just a little easier.

  2. #12
    Drew Bedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,859

    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    Jane Speed Plats?
    Drew Bedo
    www.quietlightphoto.com
    http://www.artsyhome.com/author/drew-bedo




    There are only three types of mounting flanges; too big, too small and wrong thread!

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    438

    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    My experience with shooting in a studio environment with incandescent light and modifiers is that both ISO 25 and ISO 2 plates need 2.5 stops more light (is. the “true” iso is lower by 2.5 stops) than what the metering tells me it should, plus then reciprocity/bellows corrections on top of that of course.

    Note I develop in Diafine 3+3 minutes, 1 min stop wash with water, Ilford Rapid fixer for 4mim, wash for 10 min, photoflo for 30sec.

  4. #14
    Nodda Duma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Brookline, NH
    Posts
    1,049

    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi7475 View Post
    My experience with shooting in a studio environment with incandescent light and modifiers is that both ISO 25 and ISO 2 plates need 2.5 stops more light (is. the “true” iso is lower by 2.5 stops) than what the metering tells me it should, plus then reciprocity/bellows corrections on top of that of course.

    Note I develop in Diafine 3+3 minutes, 1 min stop wash with water, Ilford Rapid fixer for 4mim, wash for 10 min, photoflo for 30sec.
    Sounds about right. The drop in speed indoors didn’t start getting addressed until the mid 20th C and even modern films lose a stop indoors. Of course the dry plates don’t take advantage of those “modern” innovations.

    Diafine! I have a can ready to mix to see how the plates respond to that unique developer.
    Newly made large format dry plates available! Look:
    https://www.pictoriographica.com

  5. #15

    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    I found that outdoors under heavy overcast conditions, especially during the winter months, the speed of the 2ASA plates is more like 0.5ASA. I've found this to be true when shooting in dense shade conditions as well.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Posts
    604

    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    Testing the 25 ASA plates [5X7] in studio with still life. Using Ilford FP4 as comparison [15 secs at f45], the J lane plate exposed for 120 secs; and yielded a thinner but printable image. Lighting was two soft boxes with spiral florescent tubes.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    438

    Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nodda Duma View Post
    Sounds about right. The drop in speed indoors didn’t start getting addressed until the mid 20th C and even modern films lose a stop indoors. Of course the dry plates don’t take advantage of those “modern” innovations.

    Diafine! I have a can ready to mix to see how the plates respond to that unique developer.
    I haven’t done a lot of comparisons against other developers, but I find Diafine works very well with your plates.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    438

    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Howk View Post
    Testing the 25 ASA plates [5X7] in studio with still life. Using Ilford FP4 as comparison [15 secs at f45], the J lane plate exposed for 120 secs; and yielded a thinner but printable image. Lighting was two soft boxes with spiral florescent tubes.
    A couple of notes... reciprocity isn’t the same in general so the numbers may not be directly comparable. It would be best to run some test comparisons in the <1 for FP4+ so that reciprocity is not a factor. I did comparisons running each 1/4 of a plate with increasing (doubling) exposure by pulling the slide in 1/4 increments. That saves plates :-)

    Second thought is that the emulsion is most sensitive to UV. Every type of light will have a different % of effective power at the range of wavelengths that the plate is sensitive to. Different people may experience different speed depending on the light type. Just like with collodion.

  9. #19
    Drew Bedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,859

    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    So do or do not use a UV filter outdoors?

    Would using a UV filter give a gain in sharpness along with a drop in effective ISO rating?

    How do the J. Lane plates respond to strobes? I use older Vivitar 283s on still lifes indoors.

    Is anyone creating Ambrotypes using J. Lane plates?
    Drew Bedo
    www.quietlightphoto.com
    http://www.artsyhome.com/author/drew-bedo




    There are only three types of mounting flanges; too big, too small and wrong thread!

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    25

    Re: Lane Dry Plates: What is a practical ISO rating?

    I’m only into my first box of plates, so I expect to be fighting the learning curve. I shot some plates last week, outside, middle of the day near the ocean. Held a blue #47 filter over the meter with ISO (I still like ASA better) 100. These plates came out properly exposed. The 2nd outing, I was shooting cars, in the sun, middle of the day, and used the same metering technique, but everything came out very thin. Thin to the point of unusable. The thin ones are drying right now, or I would put up a scan. What is the difference in why I got such thin plates the 2nd outing? Thanks.

Similar Threads

  1. J Lane Dry Plates In Studio?
    By LFLarry in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 23-Dec-2020, 09:58
  2. Printing J Lane Dry Plates
    By Alan9940 in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 14-Aug-2020, 17:23
  3. 5x7 Lane Plates
    By Two23 in forum Image Sharing (LF) & Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 30-May-2019, 20:24
  4. Lane Dry Plates
    By Jim Noel in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 27-Apr-2019, 13:14
  5. J. Lane Dry Plates and Flash
    By faberryman in forum Lighting Techniques - Studio, Artificial
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 19-Apr-2019, 14:45

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •