Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 25 of 25

Thread: Is this Bromide Drag? Help!

  1. #21

    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Posts
    195

    Re: Is this Bromide Drag? Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by horseman89 View Post
    I am however curious about why so many photographers seem to get so agitated (boom) when stand dev is brought up... but maybe thats for another thread. Why clamp down on creative exploration? Thats why we're all here... right?
    Respect for the pun. Personally, I'm relatively new to doing my own development. Being a nitwit, I leapt into 4x5 and 120, B&W and color, all within the space of... about two weeks. I like the efficiency of the SP-445, but like the capacity of the 20th century film reels. Didn't like the design of the mod-54 because I consider it a bit fiddly to load (more so than the 20th century reel).

    But I don't understand stand development-- by which, I mean, I get the concept, but I fail to see the attraction. The whole point of agitation is periodically equalize the exhausted and fresh developer throughout the tank, ie, moving the potentially exhausted developer away from the film-- you can accomplish this by rotating continuously in a roller tank, you can do it intermittently with agitation, or you can do it in the least efficient way possible, by relying on concentration gradients.

    The "benefit" is that you don't have to agitate, but in order to ensure even development, well... YOU CAN'T!!! Sorry. Ok. Obviously, you can, by waiting longer, but again-- you're relying on concentration gradients to ensure that ever bit of silver equally exhausts the nearby developer, and then over the next N number of minutes, enough fresh developer leeches into the exhausted zone to finish the developing process.

    At least with agitation, once every 30 or 60 seconds, you're effectively redistributing all the developer throughout the entire tank, and even with the SP-445 and it's tendency to leak, it's just not that difficult. The paterson, when properly sealed, simply doesn't leak.

    What am I missing?

    There's creative exploration, and then there's just shooting yourself in the foot to see if it hurts.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    10

    Re: Is this Bromide Drag? Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ulophot View Post
    Regarding scale-compression, two suggestions. See if you can find John Sexton's description of his 'slogger' technique with highly dilute developer (he uses, or used, Kodak RT with Tmax). It involves a special tray insert you can try to make yourself or have fabricated, to hold the film in a tray and allow very gentle periodic agitation.

    Another approach, which some of us here use, is called Selective Latent Image Manipulation Technique (SLIMT), involved highly-dilute efficyanide bleach prior to (usually) Normal-with-a-capital-N development, thus allowing daylight tank development. It's quite versatile, and the same technique can be used on prints. Look up http://www.davidkachel.com/assets/cont_pt3.htm
    Very cool! Thank you.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    10

    Re: Is this Bromide Drag? Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by grat View Post
    Respect for the pun. Personally, I'm relatively new to doing my own development. Being a nitwit, I leapt into 4x5 and 120, B&W and color, all within the space of... about two weeks. I like the efficiency of the SP-445, but like the capacity of the 20th century film reels. Didn't like the design of the mod-54 because I consider it a bit fiddly to load (more so than the 20th century reel).

    But I don't understand stand development-- by which, I mean, I get the concept, but I fail to see the attraction. The whole point of agitation is periodically equalize the exhausted and fresh developer throughout the tank, ie, moving the potentially exhausted developer away from the film-- you can accomplish this by rotating continuously in a roller tank, you can do it intermittently with agitation, or you can do it in the least efficient way possible, by relying on concentration gradients.

    The "benefit" is that you don't have to agitate, but in order to ensure even development, well... YOU CAN'T!!! Sorry. Ok. Obviously, you can, by waiting longer, but again-- you're relying on concentration gradients to ensure that ever bit of silver equally exhausts the nearby developer, and then over the next N number of minutes, enough fresh developer leeches into the exhausted zone to finish the developing process.

    At least with agitation, once every 30 or 60 seconds, you're effectively redistributing all the developer throughout the entire tank, and even with the SP-445 and it's tendency to leak, it's just not that difficult. The paterson, when properly sealed, simply doesn't leak.

    What am I missing?

    There's creative exploration, and then there's just shooting yourself in the foot to see if it hurts.
    So, I've gotten some great results with stand. A lot of my work has been processed in this way. Really just can't figure out why this happens intermittently, more intense in some batches than others. It's definitely the film holder giving the pattern. The Jobo reels look promising. Have even gotten some great results stand developing overnight, putting in the exact amount of dev needed to fully exhaust itself then just letting it go until... whenever.

    And my reasoning for liking stand in general is that one, it's slow, which is a speed I like to move. Hence sheet film in the first place. And, on a more romantic note, to me it captures (boom?) a marriage of precision + chance better than regular developing. I get to let go of the obsession of minutes and seconds. It's something I find alluring that connects me back to the core reason why I love photography in the first place. I find it conceptually satisfying. That's why I like it. But, thats just my two penniless cents.

    Thanks for all the input, y'all!

  4. #24
    Arca-Swiss
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    170

    Re: Is this Bromide Drag? Help!

    This is exacerbated by use of a tank. This is much cleaner when done in trays and or tanks with depth of Chemistry is well over top of sheet in holder. I had many extreme plus developments up to 2.5 to 3 hours with no issues.

    We used to use Kodak D23(now you have to make it up yourself). Adjitation for the first 30 seconds is continuous adjitation, then 10 seconds every one minute for the first hour. Then change to 1 minute continuous agitation, every 15 minutes until finished.

    This method works well on the older emulsions such as Tri-X, HP% or Fp4, for 4 stop + developments. You keep the D23 and replenish with DK25. About 4 stop expansion.

    The thinner emulsions such as Tmax for around 4 stop expansions do well using HC110 at 90 Degrees. Use a presoak of 85-90 degrees and then empty and add 90 degree developer and shake like a cocktail shaker for 90 seconds. Dump and use a stop bath at at

    least 80 degrees and then fix at about 75 degrees and then a 70degrees or so rinse in and out, then a wash aid and then wash for 5-10 minutes. You have to step the temperatures slowly or risk reticulation.

    It works,
    Rod
    Rod Klukas
    US Representative
    Arca-Swiss International
    480-755-3364


    Digital Camera Solutions including R-series Technical Cameras, Large Format View Cameras and Ballheads. 480-755-3364

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    10

    Re: Is this Bromide Drag? Help!

    UPDATE: I have solved the edge density issue caused by the Mod54 by simply introducing more agitation as some members suggested here. I also ended up adding a touch more Rodinal, up to 9ml/1000ml. Thanks! After a few tests, in the end it was a super simple fix. I now use agitation at start and end and every 15 mins for a total time of 1hr(ish). I now have perfectly even negs with the look I want... semi-stand works for me! Cheers to all. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2.jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	113.7 KB 
ID:	208862Click image for larger version. 

Name:	3.jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	135.5 KB 
ID:	208863Click image for larger version. 

Name:	4.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	120.5 KB 
ID:	208864

Similar Threads

  1. What a drag!
    By Sazerac in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 8-May-2014, 02:41
  2. Bromide drag?
    By William McEwen in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 4-Dec-2009, 20:41
  3. Kodak Bromide WFL.1D - useful?
    By Patrik Roseen in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 16-Sep-2006, 14:21
  4. Bromide drag?
    By Neil Miller in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 6-Apr-2002, 22:24

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •