Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Lightweight 8x10 for interior work?

  1. #1

    Lightweight 8x10 for interior work?

    Hi there,

    I just came across a new Shen-Hao 8x10, the FLC810-A at Badger. I'm wondering if anyone here has any experience with that camera versus other 8x10s? I'm particularly interested in comparing it with the Phillips or Canham light metal field cameras. I currently photograph with a metal Toyo 45A doing normal to wide-angle work, primarily in interiors, and am looking to get my first 8x10.

    Any thoughts or other suggestions would be much appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Robert

    www.RobertKnight.com


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    Posts
    8,968

    Lightweight 8x10 for interior work?

    Interior as in Interior Architecture?

    I don't know anything about the Shen Hao 8x10 other than your photo, but the rear standards and rear swing design seem a bit whimsical, but maybe it works quite well----i don't know. What you might consider is the rear standard's ability to get intimate with the front standard and the bellows' ability to give you a little movement when needed without any of the bed getting into view. I can't tell that from your photo and I don't know anything about the Phillips or Canham either, but a monorail like the Calumet "Green Monster," one of Peter Gowland's monorails, a Linhof or a field camera like the Deardorff v-8 with something like an 165mm f8 Super Angulon or a Grandagon up front would most likely work for you
    I steal time at 1/125th of a second, so I don't consider my photography to be Fine Art as much as it is petty larceny.
    I'm not OCD. I'm CDO which is alphabetically correct.

  3. #3
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    7,298

    Lightweight 8x10 for interior work?


  4. #4

    Lightweight 8x10 for interior work?

    Unless you are determined to get a folder, I would think the ARCA Swiss 8x10, which are available used for about what one would pay for the Shen Hao and get hugely more versatile
    features, including more movements, bag bellows etc, would be worth serious consideration.

    If you have to buy ARCA new, it is a different story because the prices are horrendous.

    I had a 5x7 shen hao and a 4x5, and while they are indeed bargains, the workmanship was
    not equal to the major brands, such as Canham or ARCA, Toyo etc. IMHO

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    9,472

    Lightweight 8x10 for interior work?

    I found an older style Arca 8x10 very inexpensively - it is a great, full featured camera - but finding a bag bellows for it may take a year of eBay patience. I may just end up having one made if I could find the frames to use.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    831

    Lightweight 8x10 for interior work?

    If weight is an issue, and you are working on a flat surface, consider a collapsible tripod dolly. Linhof made/makes one. I use it. Great little item.

  7. #7
    Ted Harris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,476

    Lightweight 8x10 for interior work?

    As already mentioned, if most of your work is interiors why the specific need for a folding field camera? You will find much more capability, generally at a lower price, in a monorail. For example, a Horseman 8x10 just sold on eBay for around 600. Beyond that the answer I posted to your question elsewhere follows:

    Of those you mentioned I have only worked extensively with the Phillips Compact II and I believe you will find it excellent for interior work (mine worked well with a Super Symmar 110 XA albeit with virtually no movement at infinity). I might question the ability to operate it with the precision one might require for architectural work. I do work regularly with the Canham wood 5x7 and believe the wood 8x10 is very similar (in fact you can get a step-up kit from Keith). I mention this because the wood 'box' around an otherwise metal camera provides additional stability and I have no rigidity problems with this camera even when fully extended. As for weight both the Canham standard and light wood 8x10 fields are about the same weight as the metal camera. Finally, in terms of saving weight you might consider going with the Canham wood 5x7/4x5 with the 4x5 back (weight ~ 6 pounds) and the 8x10 conversion for that camera (back/bellows/rear standard).

    Importantly, since you are already familiar with (and I assume comfortable with) the Toyo A, have you considered the Toyo 810 MII? I believe it will give you as much flexibility, or more than you will get from the Phillips but not as much as the Canham. It is heavier than the Phillips at ~ 15 pounds but it operates basically the same as the camera you are already used too.

  8. #8
    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Albuquerque, Nuevo Mexico
    Posts
    9,743

    Lightweight 8x10 for interior work?

    Just as a matter of curiousity. What kind of interior photography are you doing? If you are doing commercial architectural interiors, 4x5 is the industry standard because of depth of field limitation with larger formats. It takes a ton of strobe to light an interior to get f/16 usually and f/22 is preferable. It takes over twice as much light to get the same depth of field (f/22 and f/32) with an 8x10. Of course with ambient or QH light the issue becomes length of exposure to get decent depth of field with an 8x10.
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    at age 68
    "The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep"

  9. #9
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    7,298

    Lightweight 8x10 for interior work?

    Actually, that's a great point by Kirk. It's really challenging to do interiors with 8x10 because of exposure and DOF issues. What specifically are you hoping to accomplish with an 8x10 and why? That might help us focus the advice a bit better.

  10. #10
    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Albuquerque, Nuevo Mexico
    Posts
    9,743

    Lightweight 8x10 for interior work?

    Oren,

    Which is why I have primarily gone over to shooting 6x9 for commercial work. It takes alot less light or much shorter exposures to get sufficient dof. Plus film and Polaroid costs are significantly lower.
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    at age 68
    "The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep"

Similar Threads

  1. Wide Angle Lens for Canham Lightweight 8x10
    By Mark Stahlke in forum Lenses & Lens Accessories
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 6-Feb-2006, 06:51
  2. Lightweight 8x10 architectural camera (A-S?)
    By Micah Marty in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 30-Sep-2005, 10:56
  3. Pinhole work with 4x5 or 8x10
    By tim atherton in forum Style & Technique
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 25-Jun-2004, 00:12
  4. Follow Up on Toho and lightweight 8x10 Advice
    By Paul van der Hoof in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 11-Apr-2002, 15:39
  5. Field 8x10 work
    By Robin Radcliffe in forum Location & Travel
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 14-Dec-1998, 16:47

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •