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Thread: Hello!

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,341

    Re: Hello!

    Quote Originally Posted by apatnaik View Post
    I was curious about if there are any cons in developing 4X5 film at home? This was something I was looking into saving up for as well. I develop my 35mm and 120mm rolls at home since I shoot mostly black and white, so I kind have most of the setup ready except for the tank. I was wondering if that over a long run makes 4X5 a bit more affordable? I will def not be approaching developing color film anytime soon, but I was curious if developing at home makes a difference without compromising quality.

    Thanks!
    I would guess that 99% of us develop our B&W 4x5 at home, and there is no downside, especially if you are used to developing other formats. I have a darkroom, so I tray develop, which I find easy once you get a little experience (i.e. the first few times you may scratch a negative, but after that you are pretty much done with problems). Many others use a variety of different tanks, I'm sure they will chime in shortly!

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    Utah, USA
    Posts
    14

    Re: Hello!

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Lewin View Post
    I would guess that 99% of us develop our B&W 4x5 at home, and there is no downside, especially if you are used to developing other formats. I have a darkroom, so I tray develop, which I find easy once you get a little experience (i.e. the first few times you may scratch a negative, but after that you are pretty much done with problems). Many others use a variety of different tanks, I'm sure they will chime in shortly!
    Thanks you Peter! Id have to look into Tray Development a bit, but that sounds interesting! Im sorry the discussion kinda strayed away to a different direction! But its really nice to have a place to get good solid information and tips/tricks for LF! So far, a lot of the stuff I have been doing over 35 mm and 120 mm has been a bit of trial and error method, but with LF I would def like to start off with some good habits

  3. #13
    David Schaller
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Williamstown, MA
    Posts
    707

    Re: Hello!

    In fact the quality of the film you develop yourself is higher than that you send to a lab! If you can black out a bathroom and develop in 5x7 or 8x10 trays, it is very easy and precise. You can also develop in tanks and other systems, which only need to be loaded in the dark.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,354

    Re: Hello!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ulophot View Post
    A good book, such as Ansel Adams's The Camera, or Steve Simmons's Using the View Camera, is a very good way to work through camera movements, which are one of the most essential differences of LF photography. There are some useful videos on You Tube, of course; you just have to find them. There's an Art of Photography channel there that you may wish to look over, and also Tim Layton's site, among others.

    Otherwise, since you have experience with medium format, just be prepared to slow down, take your time, get to know your camera's controls by feel and location very well, and begin to establish workflow habits, i.e, accomplish procedures in the same way, in the same order, as a habit; it will save you lots of trouble, since there is nothing automatic like an auto diaphragm or film wind. Fred Picker, a well-known LF photographer and author, advised packing your camera and tripod, putting it in the car, then removing it, setting it up, taking a photo with no film, packing back up and putting it back in the car -- 50 times in a row. No less. It's good advice. You learn a lot about what works.

    The Zone System is available as a tool for creative expression, but I would concentrate on making friends with your equipment first. Be prepared to make plenty of mistakes. Take it in stride and learn from them. Take notes! The investment of time and care now will reward you.

    Have fun, and you'll find all the help you need here.
    The "Art of Photography" varies so much from standard ideas and practice it will leave you wondering. I suggest the other books which have been suggested. Or one of the well known and highly respected and skilled LF Photographers we sites or Yout Tube videos.
    The best thing to do,and a must in the long run, is take the camera out, practice setting it up, practice loading and unloading film both in the light and in the dark, then PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACtICE.

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