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Thread: New Forum--populate it!

  1. #11

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    Re: New Forum--populate it!

    Large Format Wet Plate?
    And here I was going to look for help with my Minox Spy Wet Plate camera...
    "My forumla for successful printing remains ordinary chemicals, an ordinary enlarger, music, a bottle of scotch - and stubbornness." W. Eugene Smith

  2. #12
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    New Forum--populate it!

    Quote Originally Posted by Oren Grad View Post
    Garrett - happy to acknowledge that you contributed that helpful framing. Thank you!
    Rick “Yes, of course” Denney

  3. #13
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: New Forum--populate it!

    Ha ha, I get the jab

    Quote Originally Posted by Willie View Post
    Large Format Wet Plate?
    And here I was going to look for help with my Minox Spy Wet Plate camera...
    wear mask or NOT

    is ???

  4. #14

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    Re: New Forum--populate it!

    Yes! Thanks for making this - I was beginning to think that I had missed the wet plate part of the forum

  5. #15
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Re: New Forum--populate it!

    I have only done wet plate once. But it is nice to see a sub-forum where I can come in case I want to do it again.

  6. #16
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Re: New Forum--populate it!

    Now for a very stupid question. What is encompassed in the "Wet Plate" nomenclature of this sub-forum.

    The reason I ask, is that as a photography minor, I was always intrigued by statements that "Tintype" was invented at my Alma mater. But I'm not totally clear on the differences between "Tintype," which is a well documented process, and "Wetplate" which is what exactly?? I always considered them the same, but the more I see about modern "Wet-plate" am not sure.

    In 1856, Hamilton L. Smith (1819–1903), while a professor of chemistry and physics at Kenyon College in Gambier, patented the ferrotype in America, popularly know as the tintype.

  7. #17
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    Re: New Forum--populate it!

    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Now for a very stupid question. What is encompassed in the "Wet Plate" nomenclature of this sub-forum.

    The reason I ask, is that as a photography minor, I was always intrigued by statements that "Tintype" was invented at my Alma mater. But I'm not totally clear on the differences between "Tintype," which is a well documented process, and "Wetplate" which is what exactly??
    I’m more ignorant than you, having not done it even once. But I’m thinking any processes that involve photographer-applied emulsions applied right before exposure.

    But we will let that sort itself out as we go.

    Rick “too much strictness not having a lot of value here” Denney

  8. #18
    Foamer
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    Re: New Forum--populate it!

    Wet plate is photography using collodion as the substrate to hold the silver. Tin type is wet plate done on a metal sheet to make a positive image.

    Kent in SD
    Qui sedes ad dexteram Patris,
    miserere nobis.

  9. #19

    Re: New Forum--populate it!

    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Now for a very stupid question. What is encompassed in the "Wet Plate" nomenclature of this sub-forum.

    The reason I ask, is that as a photography minor, I was always intrigued by statements that "Tintype" was invented at my Alma mater. But I'm not totally clear on the differences between "Tintype," which is a well documented process, and "Wetplate" which is what exactly?? I always considered them the same, but the more I see about modern "Wet-plate" am not sure.
    To elaborate on what Kent (correctly) stated,

    "wet plate" photography is defined as: the process in which an emulsion called Collodion (made of Ether, Ethanol, Nitrocellulose and at least one salt of Iodide or Bromide, often one of each) is poured onto a plate (can be glass, steel, aluminum, etc) and then submerged into a bath of Silver nitrate where it remains for 2 to 5 minutes. (The length of time depends on what the final plate is used for) While the collodion-coated plate is in the Silver nitrate, a process called metathesis takes place: ions are exchanged between the AgNO3 and the iodides/bromides, and what forms on the surface of the collodion is Silver iodide and/or Silver bromide, both of which are sensitive to light. The plate is lifted from the bath and placed in a plate holder (A variation on the modern film holder) and then exposed in the camera.

    The plate holder is then taken back to the darkroom (often a portable darkroom of some sort is used when the photographic plate is made on location), the plate removed and a developer is applied to the plate, typically composed of a Ferrous sulfate solution in water, with the addition of alcohol (a surfactant) and Glacial Acetic Acid (A restrainer, to control the reduction process). The development takes approximately 15 seconds for a positive image, and up to 2 minutes for a negative (different recipes of developer are used for each) and then the developer is washed off the plate, and then it is fixed - generally in traditional fixers such as Ammonium thiosulfate of Sodium thiosulfate. A thorough washing in running water follows, the plate is dried, and then varnished to protect the metallic silver image from tarnishing.

    Different names arose for different variants of the wet plate process: Tintypes are positive images on sheet metal, Ambrotypes are positives on glass. Negatives on glass are simply collodion negatives. A "Ferrotype" is the same thing as a tintype, but specifically refers to a tintype made on thin steel, blackened with Japan black varnish. Although Professor Hamilton Smith may have patented the Ferrotype in America, he was not the inventor of the process. In 1851 in England, Frederick Scott Archer announced his new process of Wet Plate Collodion to the world. He did not patent his process, preferring instead that it be shared freely with the world. Any patents obtained for various associated processes were made by other people who sought to profit from that variant. But none of them "invented" anything new or unique - the process is the result of Archer's genius.

  10. #20

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    Re: New Forum--populate it!

    Paul's description is quite good. I would add that opalotypes also fall under the "wet plate" umbrella. Opalotypes are positive images in front of a white background (usually shot on white glass but can be shot on aluminum) from a negative source. They are sort of the opposite of a tintype.

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