Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 51 to 57 of 57

Thread: Wet / dry plate photography

  1. #51

    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Posts
    65

    Re: Wet / dry plate photography

    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    a negative is made by coating glass or clear film with emulsion

    you MAY use the same chemistry to now print the negative onto paper or whatever, making a positive

    most do use different chemistry for each part of the process

    but not necessarily necessary

    a dime contact imaged onto a negative will be a clear hole

    when the negative is contact printed onto paper it is a black hole

    enlargers just make things bigger
    Thanks, I got that part. But I am asking about the emulsions and the developers. I am quite familiar with what an enlarger does. Hereís my question - if I put Foma Emulsion (for example) on a glass plate and develop in in HC 110, I will get a negative. Got it. But if I put that same emulsion on a different glass plate, expose it to a negative from an enlarger and develop it in Dektol (for example) will I get a positive print? These are 2 different applications of the same Foma Emulsion. Follow what Iím getting at here? Is it possible for the same Foma emulsion to be used to produce positive & negative images? The part that seems strange to me is that photo paper has an emulsion and film has an emulsion, yet they arenít the same emulsion, are they? Hopefully that explains my question better, thanks.

  2. #52
    Tin Can's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    16,789

    Re: Wet / dry plate photography

    They can be the same emulsion

    I suggest you try it
    Images vastly preferred

    not game trying to


    focus


    In Time

  3. #53

    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Posts
    65

    Re: Wet / dry plate photography

    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    They can be the same emulsion

    I suggest you try it
    I am going to. Thanks. It just struck me as odd that the same emulsion can do both. I guess the halides donít care where the photons are coming from.

  4. #54
    Tin Can's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    16,789

    Re: Wet / dry plate photography

    Never say or write their names!

    They hide in Darkness

    Just do it, we learn fastest....with less words

    Quote Originally Posted by urnem57 View Post
    I am going to. Thanks. It just struck me as odd that the same emulsion can do both. I guess the halides donít care where the photons are coming from.
    Images vastly preferred

    not game trying to


    focus


    In Time

  5. #55

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Posts
    261

    Re: Wet / dry plate photography

    Quote Originally Posted by urnem57 View Post
    This may be a dumb question, but here goes. I am completely new to dry plate/glass plate/tintype/prints made on glass plates photography and donít completely understand emulsions & developers. Liquid emulsions (Foma, Rollei Black Magic, Liquid Light) can be used to produce both a negative image (exposed with a camera) and/or a positive image (exposed with an enlarger)? Do I understand this correctly with the only difference being the type of developer used (film/paper)? When I buy paper & film, they are not the same emulsions on both surfaces, are they? If it is the case that the same liquid emulsions can produce negative and positive images, how is this possible? I need to understand which emulsion(s?) I need for the following: 1. producing negatives on glass plates exposed with a camera. 2. producing positive prints with an enlarger on glass plates. 3. for tintype images, will any of these emulsions work provided they are put on a black plate and developed with Rocklandís tintype developer?
    Thank you and I am looking forward to the education & better understanding before I jump in.
    As they say: There are no dumb questions. This one comes up often. Here's the simplest answer I know. With the exception of specialized formulations, all emulsions are "negative" emulsions. The emulsion on a dry plate, or a sheet of film, or a sheet of paper are all negative emulsions. That's why you can make a paper negative from a sheet of enlarging paper. When you expose a piece of paper through a negative (either as a contact print or an enlargement) you get a "positive" because more light gets through the thin areas of the negative (the shadows) than through the thick/dark areas of the negative (the highlights). You've essentially reversed the density values. If you used a positive emulsion (used to called Direct Duplicating Film), you'd just get another negative, rather than a print.
    Denise Ross
    www.thelightfarm.com
    Dedicated to the Craft of Handmade Silver Gelatin Paper, Dry Plates, and Film

  6. #56

    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Posts
    65

    Re: Wet / dry plate photography

    Thank you. This explanation allowed me to “get it” Off to Freestyle....

  7. #57

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    27

    Re: Wet / dry plate photography

    There are some very kind people on here. Ask away. That’s one way we learn.

Similar Threads

  1. What is the good camera for wet plate photography
    By hiroh in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 30-Apr-2020, 20:18
  2. Why the resurgence in wet-plate photography?
    By Sylvester Graham in forum On Photography
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 18-Jul-2012, 13:47
  3. Which camera for collodion wet plate photography
    By flashmxfreak in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-Mar-2012, 12:17
  4. Modern Camera for Plate Photography
    By rmmoore in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 19-Jul-2008, 13:22
  5. wet plate photography
    By steve simmons in forum Style & Technique
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 11-Jun-2005, 22:26

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •