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Thread: Rodinol to D 23

  1. #1
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Rodinol to D 23

    I am switching film developers for the first time in 8 years

    I will still use Rodinol, but decided to add D 23 asap

    2 very influential members here use it

    I believe one is Jim Noel, always a stable voice

    The other is Ken Lee who provides direction on his website. http://www.kennethleegallery.com/html/tech/D-23.php

    His images show truth

    Thank you both
    where is the monolith

  2. #2

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    Rodinol to D 23

    Interesting. What precipitated this after 8 years? Is it related to Rodinol or the believe that D23 will be better (tonality, less grain)? Or economy of the developer?

  3. #3

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    Re: Rodinol to D 23

    D-23 is a marvelous and simple to make developer. It has produced wonderful negs with every film stock I've tossed at it! Enjoy!

  4. #4

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    Re: Rodinol to D 23

    I use D23 with xray film and have used it with 35mm Tri-X several times in the past. If it has a shortcoming for normal film, it's a lack of highlight contrast. I seem to remember that the two-bath version doesn't have that problem, with results that are more similar to D76. Otherwise, it's very convenient to use and a nice developer without the golfball grain and empty shadows of Rodinal, which I never liked at all.
    Thanks, but I'd rather just watch:
    Large format: http://flickr.com/michaeldarnton
    Mostly 35mm: http://flickr.com/mdarnton
    You want digital, color, etc?: http://www.flickr.com/photos/stradofear

  5. #5

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    Re: Rodinol to D 23

    There are several advantages when using D-23. A short list includes:
    - Undiluted and un-contaminated lasts for a very long time. My current bottle was mixed in November 2018.
    - heavily used stock D-23 can be used to add silver density to thin negatives
    - it's very cheap
    - Very useful with a water bath to control high contrast situations
    - a simple formula which quite likely is the least dangerous developer in common use
    - negatives developed in this yield beautifully to toning for increase contrast
    - if diluted it is slow acting enough to be a very good one for use with high contrast films including lith
    That is all I can think of at the moment.
    Stay healthy and do something photographic every day.

  6. #6

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    Re: Rodinol to D 23

    In the limited BTZS testing I performed, the film speed and contrast curves with D-23 1:1 were very similar to those of other popular developers like D-76 and Pyrocat HD.

    If we enlarge small negatives, employ special development techniques, shoot under extreme lighting or print under UV, our choice of developer can make a big difference.

    Otherwise, we are free to consider secondary factors like convenience, cost, toxicity, simplicity of formula and preparation, etc.

  7. #7
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Rodinol to D 23

    Yes, I wanted low cost, simplicity, cheapest source was B+H today, I checked them all

    I will be making UVA prints soon and learn what works

    I like Rodinol, as it is also cheap and very quick to mix

    But bottles do go quickly even at 1/100 with big negs

    Large X-Ray I have used Ilford PQ 1-19

    Thank you and Jim!
    where is the monolith

  8. #8

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    Rodinol to D 23

    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    Yes, I wanted low cost, simplicity, cheapest source was B+H today, I checked them all

    I will be making UVA prints soon and learn what works

    I like Rodinol, as it is also cheap and very quick to mix

    But bottles do go quickly even at 1/100 with big negs

    Large X-Ray I have used Ilford PQ 1-19

    Thank you and Jim!
    You are buying D23 by photographers formulary from B&H? If you buy the two chemicals from aircraftchemicals it costs 44cents to develop an 8x10 sheet (500 ml). That’s treefiddy for 4L. B&H sells 4L of PF’s D23 for $19.95.

  9. #9
    Peter De Smidt's Avatar
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    Re: Rodinol to D 23

    Yeah, just buy the constituents. It's so cheap and easy to mix.

    Jim, do you mean it stores a long time, or do use it replentished?

    I plan to follow Michael's practice and use it to develop xray film in hangers.
    May tomorrow be a better day.

  10. #10
    David Schaller
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    Re: Rodinol to D 23

    I just mixed some up the other day from Artcraft chemicals. The hard part might be finding distilled water!

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