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Thread: 4x5 & 5x7 Negatives - Camera Scanning with Nikon D800E

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Annapolis, Maryland
    Posts
    159

    Re: 4x5 & 5x7 Negatives - Camera Scanning with Nikon D800E

    Using a very similar process, but a Nikon D750 (only 24MP), a Kaiser RS-1 copy stand (used it was cheap and reasonable), and Negative Supply's acrylic "glass" rather than anti-Newton ring glass (tried and it never seemed to be as newton ring free as it should have been), and similar settings for exposure. Haven't done wet scans for 4X5 although that'd be a step up. I've been using Negative Supply's holders for smaller formats (120 and 35mm) and find they do a great job. For my purposes, I'm waiting for Nikon to upgrade their mirrorless to give us stitching... so I can follow Sandy King's approach there. But I'm happy enough for now that 1 shot at 24mp does what I need. Upgrade will weigh between a Nikon Zx-something vs. outsourcing drum scans for the "best" images every now and then.

    Thanks for posting this! Great work and nice to see a similar set up. Everyone's "shares" here are a step ahead for all of us. THank you! and keep up the good work.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Posts
    134

    Re: 4x5 & 5x7 Negatives - Camera Scanning with Nikon D800E

    This thread is relevant to my interests! I've been attempting film scanning with my Nikon D800, and I've gotten very good results doing 1:1 of 35mm with a Minolta 100mm f/4 macro on a bellows, but I haven't found a satisfying lens for doing 4x5 or 6x9 as a single full frame shot. I'll keep an eye out for the Nikkor 60mm OP is using, because the example shot looks great.
    I've considered doing 1:1 in sections and stitching them together, but I've been too lazy to build an apparatus to do so reliably.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Location
    Bundaberg, Australia
    Posts
    157

    Re: 4x5 & 5x7 Negatives - Camera Scanning with Nikon D800E

    Wow, very interesting. I gather this H3 requirement for film is currently still the case? If so I find that very heartening to know that Gov bodies are mandating film.

    Also interesting because I'm currently building a DSLR scanning rig for 5x4" and 6x12cm negs. At this point it looks like I'll be doing 4x 20Mpx images of the 6x12 and 8 of the 5x4, but I'm still playing with the layout. There was a weird gotcha in the stitching that stumped me for a while.

    So far I have been very impressed with this approach, if you can see sharp grain across the entire neg you can't do much better. And I haven't had to buy a scanner. I struggle a bit with reversing the colour negs but I think I have that nailed now as well, I need to do a few more to be happy with my workflow.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Posts
    148

    Re: 4x5 & 5x7 Negatives - Camera Scanning with Nikon D800E

    Quote Originally Posted by roscoetuff-Skip Mersereau View Post
    Using a very similar process, but a Nikon D750 (only 24MP), a Kaiser RS-1 copy stand (used it was cheap and reasonable), and Negative Supply's acrylic "glass" rather than anti-Newton ring glass
    I use my Nikon D810 + 100mm macro on a Kaiser RS2XA copy stand. For lightsource I use a Kaiser Slimlite Plano LED lightpad. I have never been satisfied with using glass (including ANR glass) sandwiches, so I made my own glassless holder for the 4x5 sheets: it is a laser cut stainless steel frame with rubber feet on the underside. Glued to the steel is a layer of magnetised rubber with matching dimensions, with a second, removable matching layer of magnetised rubber on top of that. As they are magnetically aligned the two pieces of rubber frame will snap neatly together, and their dimensions are such that the sheet of film can be held by its extreme edges, allowing the entire exposed area of the film to be captured. This setup holds the 4x5 sheet securely, and remarkably flat. Forgoing the use of glass means the vast majority of surface dust can be eliminated too; a quick blast of either side with a rocket blower is all that is needed.

    With the film in the holder, I autofocus on the film grain/fine detail and take 9 x 5:4 cropped frames at about 1:2, then stitch them together. Doing this allows me to make ~ 90 megapixel digitisations from 4x5; enough to make 30 x 40" prints should I wish to. Even with the D810's 14-stop dynamic range at base ISO, for slide film I have found it best to use +/- 2EV bracketed frames (so 27 in total), then do an HDR stitch. This helps maintain shadow and especially highlight detail, and makes reproducing the appearence of the original much easier.

    I'm quite satisfied with the level of quality this method provides, but a single-capture approach with comparable or higher quality would obviously be preferable (and would be especially useful for medium format film). For this reason I would like to replace the D810 with a high resolution pixel shift capable camera at some point.

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