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Thread: Kodak Technical Pan and PMK Pyro?

  1. #1

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    Kodak Technical Pan and PMK Pyro?

    Does anyone have experience developing Kodak Technical Pan (120 and 4x5) in PMK Pyro?

    Just looking for some starting points. I will obviously do some testing, but if anyone has any pointers re time and temperature, they would be greatly appreciated.

    Cheers.

  2. #2
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Kodak Technical Pan and PMK Pyro?

    It's the only film that I never got to work with PMK. I wouldn't bother even trying. Stick with contone developers specifically made for TechPan. Photographers Formulary still has one or two good ones.

  3. #3
    Eric Woodbury
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    Re: Kodak Technical Pan and PMK Pyro?

    It really depends on what effect you want from the Tech Pan. I use TP for N+4 to N+6. With PMK, I believe I split the development, soaking the film in concentrate A and then bringing up the image with the alkali. Yesterday, I developed TP in Xtol equivalent at 1:1. Long ago, I developed in a POTA-like developer. I may have split that too. And Rodinal works, too.

    I only shoot 2415 sporadically, but I have a lot of film left, so I need to use more. Never used it with N-development.

    All my experience is with the TP sheet film.

  4. #4
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: Kodak Technical Pan and PMK Pyro?

    What will you be doing with the negatives? Tech Pan yield negatives of very high contrast. If you will be enlarging the negatives it will be difficult to control the contrast with normal developers, including staining developers (as Drew mentioned).

    I have had success working with both specialized developers and standard developers when creating high-contrast (DR 2.8+) negatives for alt. processes. I have an on-going project using Tech Pan and Kodak/Ilford Copy Film (4x5) in the redwoods.

    Another way to take advantage of the film would be to use it situations of very low contrast, where the increase in contrast due to the film can be used to ones advantage in silver printing, etc.
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  5. #5

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    Re: Kodak Technical Pan and PMK Pyro?

    Thanks for chiming in guys.

    I will be doing a few things with the film. Everything from studio still-life, to architectural studies.

    I have about 30 rolls of 120, and 150 sheets of 4x5. Always on the look out for more.

    I have used PMK for several years with mainly Ilford (delta 100 and FP4) with great success, as well as Verichrome Pan in 120.

    I will be scanning it. (put away the pitchforks).

    I am aware of the Photographers Formulary options and may go that way, but wanted to explore PMK as I have it on hand, and it would simplify things if I could stick with one dev.

    PMK inherently "masks" highlights and I thought that might "help" with the contrast? I will obviously do some testing with my set up before committing to any serious work. Just looking for starting points at this stage.

    Thanks for your input so far.

    Cheers,
    Jason.

  6. #6
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Kodak Technical Pan and PMK Pyro?

    TechPan has inherently poor tonality at the extremes. Highlights easily blow out, and I don't think pyro stain will cure that. I have a mountaineering friend addicted to it in 120, and the "soot and chalk" effect is quite evident in high-contrast scenes. I mostly used it for actual technical applications, and still have quite a few 8x10 sheets, but did at one time reasonably tame it for pictorial use. I'd seek out slightly softer or diffused lighting, or do studio subjects.

  7. #7

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    Re: Kodak Technical Pan and PMK Pyro?

    I've found Formulary TD-3 to work well... but using TP for long-scale subjects is a losing battle. And its high resolution doesn't matter much with sheet film, unless you want to make 40" wide enlargements. Still that 'glassy' look it has will work for some subjects- best of luck!

  8. #8

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    Re: Kodak Technical Pan and PMK Pyro?

    Hi Drew,

    Very odd to hear your description of Tech Pan's characteristics. They are not my recollection at all. I used it a lot many years ago, before going all digital. But that was using the original Technidol developer. I found the highlights to be fantastic, not blown out at all.

    I will do some tests with PMK, but it looks like TD-3 will be the solution I am looking for.

    Mark, that 'glassy' look is exactly the reason I have chosen TP for some of the projects I have in mind.

    Cheers,
    Jason.

  9. #9

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    Re: Kodak Technical Pan and PMK Pyro?

    This article has some PMK times and description of use with other developers. I have a box of 4415 I want to try one day.
    http://www.alexluyckx.com/blog/index...technical-pan/
    Adventure is worthwhile in itself. ... Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn't be done. -- Amelia Earhart
    http://www.searing.photography

  10. #10

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    Re: Kodak Technical Pan and PMK Pyro?

    Years ago processed Kodak Technical Pan in very dilute Rodinal (1:100?) in a 9% Sodium Sulfite solution. Excellent N development and even came close to approaching a N-1 development. Film was from a State surplus store so I had no way of knowing how it was stored over the years. Unfortunately it went bad quite quickly, so evidently the film wasn't exactly stored under refrigeration.

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