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Thread: A simple and practical 4x5 snapshot camera

  1. #41

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    Re: A simple and practical 4x5 snapshot camera

    Not only that, sometimes I just don't want to take more than 1 or 2 photos and develop them within a few months.
    Expert in non-working solutions.

  2. #42

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    Re: A simple and practical 4x5 snapshot camera

    Two separate posts at the exact same time...yikes! (oh, that's right - there are 60 whole seconds in one minute!)

  3. #43

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    Re: A simple and practical 4x5 snapshot camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Lewin View Post
    May I add a very late, possibly naive, question? I have enjoyed LF photography for close to 50 years, because I enjoy the thinking and precision afforded by a tripod and 4x5 movements, and in the darkroom I like the quality of the large negatives. But for handheld snapshot use, I prefer either 35mm or my medium format Rollie. The 120 roll film in particular still has large enough negatives so that at 11x14 prints there is little difference from 4x5. That said, what is the point of a 4x5 snapshot camera, where you give up the use of swings and tilts and the precision of a tripod, but also the easier film handling of roll film for taking multiple shots?
    Yes, thank you, Peter! What you said is very good we can discuss it.

    Camera development, from large to small. More than 180 years. When people are shooting, miniaturization is more convenient. Young people today cannot imagine what cameras journalists used before the 1930s. Sure, medium format negatives are not too small, but 4X5 covers three times the area of 120 negatives and 14.7 times the area of 135 negatives, which may be another reason for the improved quality of large negatives.

    You are the senior of LF. I use large frame, about 30 years later than you. We made this camera as a supplement to our everyday camera collection, not a must-have. For example, we used SINAR P2 for our commercial photography. When we went to Tibet, I used K.B.Canham 8X10, which was made of wood. You know, at high altitude, this machine and the large tripod was a heavy burden.

    There is no perfect camera, only the right one.

    thank you

  4. #44

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    Re: A simple and practical 4x5 snapshot camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    because they want to
    "Was vernunftig ist, das ist wirklich; Und was wirklich ist, das ist vernunftig "-- Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts 1820)

    ——Existence is truth.

    Over the years, there have been many fast shooting cameras, such as the earlier Sinar handy and Cambo, and the recent Travelwide and Mercury. In China, there are FOTOMAN, Gaoersi and Dayi. The creators of several Chinese products are our familiar friends.

    I think the camera maker has to be the user of the camera. We made COSMOS CIRCLE out of our own needs, and we were the first to use it.

    thank you

  5. #45

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    Re: A simple and practical 4x5 snapshot camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Havoc View Post
    Not only that, sometimes I just don't want to take more than 1 or 2 photos and develop them within a few months.
    We use quick-motion cameras, mainly for scene recording and people photography. I'm not sure I can hit these dynamic shots with one shot, so my COSMOS CIRCLE, will be equipped with FUJI QUICK CHANGE and shoot 2-3 shots.

  6. #46

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    Re: A simple and practical 4x5 snapshot camera

    Quote Originally Posted by John Layton View Post
    Two separate posts at the exact same time...yikes! (oh, that's right - there are 60 whole seconds in one minute!)
    Oh, you found me! Ha ha

    This is because my English is not very good, I have written several replies in advance, put them in the file, and then send them together.

    I'm sorry to make you laugh.

  7. #47

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    Re: A simple and practical 4x5 snapshot camera

    Quote Originally Posted by John Layton View Post
    We all have our own thresholds...and indeed, depending upon the nature of light, subject, logistics, etc. etc., medium format is often a better choice than LF.

    Personally, I typically do not print smaller than 16x20 these days...and while my Fuji/Voigtlander 6x7's (and to some degree my Hasselblad) can indeed often stand up to and even exceed what I could obtain with LF at this print size (again, depending on light/subject/logistics), its when I go to 20x30, 30x40 and 40x60 that I truly appreciate the qualities offered by LF.

    Then again, some of these qualities relate to the inherent flexibility offered by LF - and I would find it very difficult to give up various movements, particularly axial and off-axial rotations, for most of my landscape work. But for tramping up into the mountains and hoping to create some broad, distant views, a simple, lightweight, fixed focus LF camera could be perfect, assuming sufficient light if handheld, and that a significantly closer foreground is not important or if, for whatever reason, DOF is not that important or even distracting.

    But even on those days which would be bright enough to use LF hand held, I often find myself reaching for something like an orange filter...and the two stop sacrifice that this entails often eliminates the possibility of hand held LF, excepting in cases when I can compensate (at least somewhat) for the lack of this filter through selective processing.

    Horses for courses here - knowing that lots of folks like handheld LF for the specific qualities offered even at very small print sizes, and even (thinking of Nicholas Nixon) contact prints.
    The speech of the seniors reminds me of a past.

    In 2009, my good friend, Jianguo Feng, and I were shooting portraits in Tibet. I was his assistant. He used three cameras to take portraits: one was TOYO 810M2+NIKON 240/5.6, which used black and white film to take important portrait pictures; One was polaroid, which returned pictures of its subjects to him; One is a digital camera, a record of portrait photography. Jianguo Feng operates the 8X10 camera, and I operate the latter two. I think it would be a good choice to replace digital cameras with 4X5 cameras.

    Fast-motion cameras can do fast work, but they are not a replacement for mainframes.

    thank you

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