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Thread: Marble caverns

  1. #11
    Foamer
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    Re: Marble caverns

    I've done a fair amount of photography from a kayak, including the caves on Lake Superior. If you are using a kayak I will give you a warning. When you look through a camera your body is no longer keeping balance with the boat. Unless the boat is very wide and stable there's a good chance you will tilt to one side and capsize (roll) the boat. You're best off trying to point the camera and look over it and not through it. Yes, fast film, hyperfocal.


    Kent in SD
    Qui sedes ad dexteram Patris,
    miserere nobis.

  2. #12
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Dec 2011
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    Re: Marble caverns

    Yo comprende

    Pero, I read espanol better than I write or speak it



    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Collins View Post
    Hola, los cazadores de los patos en los EEUU usan muchas veces un pequeño bote, se llama un "John boat." Con un fondo plano, es muy estable. Por favor, no kayak! Ni un canoa! Pero con un poco de gracia y suerte!
    sin eater

  3. #13

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    Re: Marble caverns

    Alpacka packrafts are very stable, light & portable: https://www.alpackaraft.com/rafting/. You may be able to rent one.
    The future is not what it used to be - Arthur C. Clarke

  4. #14
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: Marble caverns

    When I was there last year, the wind did howl!
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  5. #15
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Marble caverns

    This is in a different area, Vaughn. But I was reminded of the Patagonian winds yesterday. Kinda odd this time of year, but trees were toppling. I have a huge araucaria (monkey puzzle) tree. These came from Patagonia, and even though they're coniferous evergreens, the limbs are almost rubbery and sway in strong winds without breaking.
    Lots of thorny fronds come down, but not the limbs themselves - they're engineered for wind.

  6. #16

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    Re: Marble caverns

    I'd advise that LF is not the tool for the job...

    Even on large ships, large tugboat etc, I have used tripod mounted cameras while ship was at the dock in still water and you can watch the horizon move up and down, and the edges change... And some "bounce" movement...

    A viewfinder camera with a faster lens would make life easier... A press camera or MF that can shoot with a lens f5.6 with good DOF and handheld to shoot upwards, and shutter speeds over 1/60th... Being able to shoot multiple frames quickly before the boat moves again and edit frames for best sharpness/lower movement...

    The bigger the camera,the bigger the chance it will make images worse, not better...

    Steve K

  7. #17
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: Marble caverns

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Wiley View Post
    This is in a different area, Vaughn. ...
    Actually it was. We tried to drive down to the shore near them but turned around as the road steepened. Then we had to turn around again because I could only get enough traction with the front-wheel drive mini-minivan in reverse. We eventually got to where one can take boats out on tours, Puerto Rio Tranquilo, is the town....and the wind was strong enough to keep one from much photographing at all from a kayak! One might have better luck in the mornings, though.
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  8. #18
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Marble caverns

    I thought Carrarra Lake was on the border with Argentina, the side it's mainly accessed from. Yes, the Paine Range is too. My next door neighbor came from that part of Argentina. I'm afraid it will become another photographic cliche just like Antelope Canyon. But exposed marble that colorful seem to be rare, let alone lakeside caves of it. If I was going to the trouble of visiting there, think I'd take my Fuji GW690II RF and buy a supplementary GSW equivalent, and even then the deep relief of all the nooks and crannies might be tricky for depth of field handheld with color film. B&W TMY 400 might be a little easier, but not if you factor in contrast filters. I've done my share of cave entrances and tunnels, and sure can't imagine doing that without a tripod or gyro mount. Flash has never appealed to me, but there's that too.

  9. #19
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: Marble caverns

    Lago Gral Carrera is also on Hwy 7 (Chile)...along its western side. The lake spans across the border. We were heading north on Hyw 40 in Argentina, cut over on Hwy 41, then took a new road/border crossing back into Chile and hit Hwy 7 south of Lago Gral Carrera. This allowed us to miss a lot of nothing (including Chile Chico) and saw some interesting country instead. Less traffic too...saw two other vehicles.
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  10. #20
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Marble caverns

    Sounds fun. I think something like a Sinar Handy equipped with a 6X12 roll film back might be an interesting option in this case. I'd be more likely to research if there are places with a little beach appropriate to set up a long lens and full LF instead. I've done quite a bit of LF shooting of the little sea caves of Tomales Point, accessing them at low tide (sometimes wading a bit), and have seen just how frustrated people get trying to even get near them in sea kayaks. The waves are obviously much more agitated nearer to the cliffs. They're pretty surprised to see me there with a huge pack and big wooden tripod, and no boat. Finding a film that responds to the amazing fluorescent lichen and algal colors is a bigger problem. Only the old pre-E6 grainy Agfachrome 50 did it right.

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