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Thread: Enlarged Film Negatives Process?

  1. #31
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Enlarged Film Negatives Process?

    I'm still aging my last Keith Canham TMax purchase

    Almost ready!
    sin eater

  2. #32

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    Re: Enlarged Film Negatives Process?

    None of the regular photo retailers have T-Max 100 8x10 in stock (B&H, Adorama, Freestyle) and in fact, it isn't even listed as an option. I can only guess that makes T-Max 100 a special order case which makes FP4 even more attractive. It is cheaper, readily available, and no special order requirements. If a person is truly committed to the film it is one thing to order a bunch up with Keith, but if you are just wanting to test/try the film out, that is another issue. Anyway, all good, but in my case, I am just going to use FP4.


    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Wiley View Post
    I've never had any problem getting either speed of TMax in 8x10. But like certain other commodities it can temporarily run out at certain dealers. I recommend getting on Keith Canham's list.

  3. #33
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Enlarged Film Negatives Process?

    B&H buys a volume of it at a time. When it runs out, they temporarily remove it from the listing, then reinstitute the listing once a fresh batch is expected soon. People who use films like this often buy a quantity at a time, then freeze it. Keith always notifies me when he's ordered up a whole new cut of 8x10. He has high volume users, and sells the leftovers to people like me. But if he has enough orders in advance, more can be cut and boxed by Kodak for his anticipated quantity. There's an ebb and flow to it. But it's not a special order product with B&H. It's either in stock or it's not. But for general shooting, TMY400 is used a lot more by general photographers in 8x10, and is more likely to be in stock, whereas TMX100 8x10 seems to mainly have industrial and technical volume users. Same with me - I use TMX100 8x10 mainly in the lab, and TMY400 mainly in the field. With smaller formats, I use both in the field.

  4. #34
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Enlarged Film Negatives Process?

    Keith Canham is the only supplier of custom KODAK film cuts https://www.canhamcameras.com/

    Many sizes and types of film possible if the accumulated total of orders prepaid to Keith reaches the threshold for KODAK to leap into action

    I have bought twice from Keith, he is excellent in all ways

    Case ot Tri-X 11X14, with 11X14 and 8X10 TMAX 400 aging just fine
    sin eater

  5. #35

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    Re: Enlarged Film Negatives Process?

    Quick question for the group here.

    I thought I would be productive while I am waiting for the Bergger print film to get released and try my hand at using two sheets of film to make an enlarged negative.

    I have a couple really nice 35mm negatives that I would like to enlarge to 8x10. From a quality standpoint, that should not be an issue. If so, please let me know.

    Since I have no expereince with this process yet, I was wondering when I make the inter-positive from the 35mm negative, do you see any issue with enlarging the 35mm negative to 4x5 (Inter-positive) to them project that on to the 8x10 film to make the enlarged negative?

    It would be cheaper if I could use a sheet of 4x5 and 8x10 vs. two sheets of 8x10, but I wanted to see if that is a reasonable approach or not?

    Thanks

  6. #36
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Enlarged Film Negatives Process?

    Each generation degrades quality


    I consider my Atomic Bomb image 6 generations as you see it
    1 first neg
    2 Interneg
    3 Enlarged Print
    4 Copy/scan to digital
    5 Upload to Flickr
    6 Copy & post here

    There are no rules, try it both ways at least

    I shot twenty 5X7 X-Ray films until I got a neg I liked and now it's lost...
    sin eater

  7. #37

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    Re: Enlarged Film Negatives Process?

    I just thought of another option that I had not thought about in a while regarding making an enlarged negative from smaller film.

    I could just make an 8x10 print and get everything as desired with the dodging, burning, contrast, etc. and then just use my 8x10 camera to make a copy negative of the print.

    I have never done this before, but I am aware of the process.

    I know that I need to light the print using two lights at 45 degrees and ensure the film and the print are prefectly parallel.

    The only question that I have with this method is what is the best paper to use for the print (glossy, matte, etc?).

    If you have experinece making copy negatives like this, I would love to know your thoughts.


    Thanks

  8. #38
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Enlarged Film Negatives Process?

    I would use my cheapest paper first and if I liked the result I would do it again.

    When printing in dark room if I like a print I make at least 3 more right away.

    When I shot 35mm sometimes I would shot a roll of identical slides for future use.
    sin eater

  9. #39

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    Re: Enlarged Film Negatives Process?

    I was thinking in terms of paper surface (glossy, matte, etc) that is best suited for making the negative of the print.

    Does anyone have experience with this and can provide some guidance or does it even matter?




    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    I would use my cheapest paper first and if I liked the result I would do it again.

    When printing in dark room if I like a print I make at least 3 more right away.

    When I shot 35mm sometimes I would shot a roll of identical slides for future use.

  10. #40
    Cor's Avatar
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    Re: Enlarged Film Negatives Process?

    Bit late in this converstion, but last month I have been using Liam Lawless his procedure (see link in one of the first answers in this thread) to directly reversal process Arista Lith film with succes. I used a 4*5 negative as well as a 6*4.5 (cm) negative to directly make 8*10 negative suitable for Kallitypes.

    It was surprisingly easy, and direct reversal excludes the need for an inter positive ( less hassle less dust etc.) It does mean mixing your own chemistry and finding a suitable developer (I used diluted Xray developer, but there are other recipes around ( Rodinal 1:25 for instance). Oh and I did use the Potassiumpermangate bleach, working with dichromates I try to avoid. Last week I even "reversed" double sided blue Fuiji Xray film, a bit of a pain because of the double sided fragile emulsion and the speed. to my surprise I did not need the flash exposure, and the Dmax was just enough for Cyanotype.

    Good luck,

    Cor

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