Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Tilt/shift etc when doing wet plates

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Between here and there
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Sweden & Germany
    Posts
    448

    Tilt/shift etc when doing wet plates

    Just curious,

    do you wetplaters use a lot of movements? I've only done a workshop once, seen other people in action a few times and all of these occasions were portrait sessions. Given the "speed" and the specifics of the emulsion, f:64 with a bunch of movements is probably less common, I guess.
    "Be still and allow the mud to settle."

  2. #2

    Re: Tilt/shift etc when doing wet plates

    I don’t think you’re often going to find people shooting collodion at f64, with or without camera movements! The collodion isn’t just too slow for that unless you are working in blazing midday sun.
    But it’s not uncommon to use some camera movements at large apertures (many people use their lenses wide open) to introduce out of focus areas intentionally. It’s far less common to use movements to correct perspective or increase depth of field when working on wet plate. But if lighting is good enough, I suppose you could do it if you wanted.
    The bottom line is: you can’t introduce variables that will make your exposures longer than a couple of minutes at most, or the plate dries out.

  3. #3
    Foamer
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    1,942

    Re: Tilt/shift etc when doing wet plates

    I rarely stop down past f22. I don't use tilt as that's not original to the era. I do use front rise because I photo a lot of buildings. The image circle on the 19th C lenses i use generally isn't very big.


    Kent in SD
    Qui sedes ad dexteram Patris,
    miserere nobis.

  4. #4
    Mark Sawyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Stuck inside of Tucson with the Eastern Seaboard Blues again...
    Posts
    5,739

    Re: Tilt/shift etc when doing wet plates

    I use both large and small apertures, from f/3.5-ish to f/32-ish, and often use movements. As a rule, the more open the lens, the more important it is to have movements to push that shallow depth of field around.

    Kent is right that most movements weren't around in the early wet plate era (1850's), but were coming in towards the end, (early 1880's). It's up to the individual whether that's important to them. But if you're using a wide-open Petzval, you'll find the curved field makes the movements behave a bit differently.
    "I love my Verito lens, but I always have to sharpen everything in Photoshop..."

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    916

    Re: Tilt/shift etc when doing wet plates

    I bet most LF users don't really use "a lot of movements". Some at times but seldom a lot of them and even less - extremes.

    The images of the camera tied in a knot is interesting but few would ever use it that way - the prints come out all knotted up.
    "My forumla for successful printing remains ordinary chemicals, an ordinary enlarger, music, a bottle of scotch - and stubbornness." W. Eugene Smith

  6. #6
    Mark Sawyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Stuck inside of Tucson with the Eastern Seaboard Blues again...
    Posts
    5,739

    Re: Tilt/shift etc when doing wet plates

    Quote Originally Posted by Willie View Post
    I bet most LF users don't really use "a lot of movements"...
    Not as a rule, but I've had mine do yoga poses before...
    "I love my Verito lens, but I always have to sharpen everything in Photoshop..."

  7. #7
    Between here and there
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Sweden & Germany
    Posts
    448

    Re: Tilt/shift etc when doing wet plates

    Thanks for your comments. Normally I don't use much movements either, but I see the point of moving what little depth of field one might have with a wide or near wide open lens around. The field curvature might get interesting to get to know when I get down to buying a petzval.

    I promise to stay away from knotted prints - the only that gets to be that way are the ones going in the (large) waste basket.
    "Be still and allow the mud to settle."

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 1998
    Location
    Buford, GA
    Posts
    13,056

    Re: Tilt/shift etc when doing wet plates

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimi View Post
    Thanks for your comments. Normally I don't use much movements either, but I see the point of moving what little depth of field one might have with a wide or near wide open lens around. The field curvature might get interesting to get to know when I get down to buying a petzval.

    I promise to stay away from knotted prints - the only that gets to be that way are the ones going in the (large) waste basket.
    Tilts donít change depth of field. Only the lens aperture changes the depth of field.

    Tilts change the plane of sharp focus. The two work together.

  9. #9

    Re: Tilt/shift etc when doing wet plates

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimi View Post
    Thanks for your comments. Normally I don't use much movements either, but I see the point of moving what little depth of field one might have with a wide or near wide open lens around. The field curvature might get interesting to get to know when I get down to buying a petzval.
    In my experience, working with a Petzval lens requires a rather different approach to constructing a photograph. The unique curved focal plane is its own animal and doesn't respond in quite the same way as a "normal" lens when it comes to shifts and tilts. The Petzval optic has a very strong visual style that doesn't lend itself to further manipulation - in my opinion, anyway. Most practitioners working with a Petzval lens are using a lens designed for a smaller format than what its being applied to, and so there's is often ZERO image circle left to play with (for movements), as the lens is already working beyond its intended limits. But you will discover these things yourself, when you acquire a nice Petzval lens. They are a joy to work with. Be sure you get a "proper" Petzval and not just a Magic Lantern lens. A Petzval intended for use as a photographic lens is generally better crafted than a Magic Lantern lens. I have a couple of the latter, and they make for very soft images.

  10. #10
    C. D. Keth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    2,083

    Re: Tilt/shift etc when doing wet plates

    I donít understand the automatic assumption that wet plate is synonymous with petzval use.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    -Chris

Similar Threads

  1. Tilt/Shift with Wide Angle
    By alanmcd in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 7-Feb-2016, 03:54
  2. How to shift, pan, tilt on a Sinar F2?
    By macandal in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 4-May-2013, 14:20
  3. Front tilt/shift
    By el french in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 21-Nov-2008, 22:28

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •