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Thread: Lens for color

  1. #11

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    Re: Lens for color

    Quote Originally Posted by Corran View Post
    Please explain what you mean by "the colors artificial?"

    E100VS is a saturated and high-contrast color positive film. For portraits I assume you will be shooting color neg, which will have a very different look. Your choice of lens can/should also pair with your choice of film. I like the look of older, lower-contrast lenses on positive film. On negative, it might be too much.

    Multicoating and APO are two different things with two different purposes. If you want high performance, you should get an APO lens.

    For color (or b&w) portrait work I personally have used a Voigtlander 15cm f/4.5 APO Lanthar and enjoy that lens a lot. It has the APO performance with a classic look and contrast profile. YMMV. Perhaps find images appealing to you in the monthly "portrait" thread and see what lenses they are using.
    Thanks for your comments.
    I will look for a 150 APO. The Voigtlander for sure is one of the best but I will consider cheaper options.

  2. #12

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    Re: Lens for color

    View camera lenses have been color corrected for over a century. Chester Hill came up with achromatic color correction about 1729, since about the time, color correction for quality photographic lenses was a standard design and production requirement. Beginnings of achromatic color correction was used often in microscope optics:
    https://www.leica-microsystems.com/s...scopy-part-ii/

    Difficulty with the APO designation, it's definition can vary among brand and standards of what APO means. Know the APO designator alone does not define absolute color correction, color fidelity and all those expectations imposed on the APO designator. Late 1800's came Apochromatic microscope objectives using natural Fluroite crystals.

    "After designing, testing and selling many different apochromatic lenses I can state this: There is no "definite" line where a lens becomes "apochromatic" in the world of commercial apochromatic lenses."

    ~Read this informative article before getting caught in the marketing of APO designated lenses.~
    http://www.csun.edu/~rprovin/tmb/definition.html


    IMO, save your $, APO designation alone is not an assurance of excellent color fidelity and color reproduction.
    Bernice




    Quote Originally Posted by Pedro_fiz View Post
    I will look for a 150 APO.

  3. #13

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    Re: Lens for color

    What Bryan and Bernice said...

    But buy an apo lens if you really think that will improve your images.

  4. #14
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Lens for color

    I read here on the forum, (must be true) that any sharp LF lens even before color had to resolve color well just to be sharp at the useful wavelengths
    sin eater

  5. #15

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    Re: Lens for color

    Question is... how can any "APO" lens improve your images?

    ~Consider the expectation projection factor.~
    Bernice

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    But buy an apo lens if you really think that will improve your images.

  6. #16

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    Re: Lens for color

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernice Loui View Post
    Question is... how can any "APO" lens improve your images?

    ~Consider the expectation projection factor.~
    Bernice
    I don’t think it can or will... nor did I say or imply that it would/could... but sometimes there’s a psychology of belief that is in play....

    I’ve quite successfully shot color with a B&L Rapid Rectilinear that I think dates from 1910 or 1920.

  7. #17
    Corran's Avatar
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    Re: Lens for color

    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    I read here on the forum, (must be true) that any sharp LF lens even before color had to resolve color well just to be sharp at the useful wavelengths
    I think chromatic aberrations can make images look less sharp in b&w.

    Color filter helps the problem I think - hence the recommendation for using them over single elements of the Symmar convertible.
    Bryan | Blog | YouTube | Instagram
    All comments and thoughtful critique welcome

  8. #18

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    Re: Lens for color

    Precisely, based on an awful lot of color transparencies burned/processed and dialing in the entire color transparency process, APO is more marketing than actual substance. Add to this the real world of optical design folks as mentioned in post#12 tell pretty much what and how APO is used as a marketing ploy.

    No surprise that a rapid rectilinear from the early 1900's does good on color as it is color corrected well enough. Keep in mind one of the classic LF lenses the Dagor dates back to before 1900 and it's color rendition on film is more than good enough.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=7Y...signer&f=false


    Bernice


    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    I don’t think it can or will... nor did I say or imply that it would/could... but sometimes there’s a psychology of belief that is in play....

    I’ve quite successfully shot color with a B&L Rapid Rectilinear that I think dates from 1910 or 1920.

  9. #19

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    Re: Lens for color

    Thanks for your comments.
    Finally I will use my current lenses and I will see the results. There will be time to decide later.

    Enviado desde mi ANE-LX1 mediante Tapatalk

  10. #20
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Lens for color

    MC is not necessarily related to color rendering; sometimes it has been used to fine-tune that kind of property; but many single-coated lenses are just as good in terms of hue reproduction. Nearly all modern post-60's view camera lenses are very well color-corrected. Apo is related to something else - precise alignment of different wavelengths of color for sake of high reproduction standards, or a high degree of enlargement. Since you're starting out with large format film, it probably won't need a lot of magnification in print. "Apo" seems to be a term partially abused for marketing purposes. Again, basically a non-issue for general photography with any relatively modern lens. Focal length is yet another topic, related to what kind of perspective you like: wide, slightly wide, normal, somewhat longer, long narrow perspective? It can be hard to decide until you experiment some. What kind of images do you mostly have in mind?

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