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Thread: Lens Filters for 4x5

  1. #21
    Drew Saunders drew.saunders's Avatar
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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post

    Can you use a hood with Lee filters?
    Lee hoods have filter slots. I have the wide angle hood with two slots, and a Lee adapter for all my regularly used lenses. My infrequently used lenses are all the same filter diameter as a lens for which I already have a Lee adapter, or a copy. I recently bought an adapter from ďFilterDudeĒ on eBay thatís as good as a Lee original. I find the wide angle hood works for my 300mm lens on 4x5, so I see no need for the regular hood.

    I just tried to look up the wide angle hood and itís listed as discontinued by B&H! Hereís the link which shows how it works: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...Hood_Wide.html

    Iíve been using the Lee hood and filters for years and it works well.


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  2. #22
    Drew Saunders drew.saunders's Avatar
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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    It looks like the Lee hoods with built-in filter slots have been replaced by the Lee100 hood that attaches to a filter holder, and then the holder attaches to the adapter. I like my older one better, I just attach the hood to the adapter and Iím done!

    https://www.leefilters.com/


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  3. #23

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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    Do people shooting large format general not use hoods? Or something else?
    I think this is the case. I assisted a friend of mine for several years, who is a local, well known architectural photographer. During his film years, he photographed with 4x5 using a Sinar F1, and I never once saw him use a hood. The time that it would have taken to set up was far too valuable.

    I've tended to adopt his approach. He would regularly shade the front of the lens to make sure that direct light would never fall on the face of a lens, or the filter that he would use. There's a Sinar clip that can hold black cards and position them in various orientations, depending on the position of the sun.

    He used a bag bellows for almost all his exposures, and I think that this can help channel stray light into internal bellows nether lands. One thing that I like about my 171mm Arca camera (regardless of vintage), is that there's extra space around the 4x5 format, so that stray light is less likely to fall on the negative. Arca has since reduced their camera size to using 141mm lensboards, and because of the flare implications, it's unlikely that I would upgrade to the smaller size. (Not that I could afford it.)

    I've seen references tha Fred Picker also used this approach.

    None the less, my camera has the 6x9 front, which has a conveniently small compendium lens shade. I carry this lense shade with me, should the need arise.

    I see 8x10 as being different, and I'm very likely to use a Lee, flexible compendium lens hood for this camera. For 8x10 or otherwise, I've replaced all (save one) my large lenses with smaller maximum aperture versions. This makes using a lenshood more convenient. It also makes for a lighter kit.

    Based on input from John Sexton in a workshop that I attended, I'm more likely to use MC glass filters. I've standardized on 77mm filters and carry step-up rings to that diameter for all my lenses.

    The one exception is my 610mm Repro Claron, which has an 82mm filter thread. With this lens on 8x10, I don't mind using 4" gel filters in my Lee compendium lenshood.
    Last edited by neil poulsen; 13-Jan-2020 at 11:56.

  4. #24

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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    Do people shooting large format general not use hoods? Or something else?
    I think this is the case. I assisted a friend of mine for several years, who is a local, well known architectural photographer. During his film years, he photographed with 4x5 using a Sinar F1, and I never once saw him use a hood. The time that it would have taken to set up was far too valuable.

    I think that I've tended to adapt his approach. Rather, he would use the dark slide and shade the front of the lens to make sure that direct light would never fall on the face of a lens, or the filter that he would use. There's a Sinar clip that can hold black cards and position them in various orientations, depending on the position of the sun.

    He used a bag bellows for almost all his exposures, and I think that this can help channel stray light into the internal bellows nether lands. One thing that I like about my 171mm Arca camera (regardless of vintage), is that there's extra space around the 4x5 format, so that stray light is less likely to fall on the negative. Arca has since reduced their camera size to using 141mm lensboards, and because of the flare implications, it's unlikely that I would upgrade to the smaller size. (Not that I could afford it.)

    None the less, my camera has the 6x9 front, which has a conveniently small compendium lens shade. I carry this lensshade with me, should the need arise.

    I think that 8x10 is different, and I'm very likely to use a Lee, flexible compendium lens hood for this camera. For 8x10 or otherwise, I've replaced all (save one) my large lenses with smaller maximum aperture versions. This makes using a lenshood more convenient.

    Based on input from John Sexton in a workshop that I attended, I'm more likely to use glass filters. I've standardized on 77mm filters and carry step-up rings to that diameter for all my lenses.

    The one exception is my 610mm Repro Claron, which has an 82mm filter thread. With this lens on 8x10, I don't mind using 4" gel filters in my Lee compendium lenshood. This hood also works with glass filters.

  5. #25
    tgtaylor's Avatar
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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Ever since getting into LF I've used a Cokin Z-Pro filter holder with resin and now glass 100mm filters. The best advise with this system would be to start with a 95mm filter holder adapter ring and use step-down rings to fit your various lens. With the 95mm filter holder adapter I can use filters on the 610 and 760mm apo-Nikkors, and the 300mm Nikkor - all of which have 95mm threads. Trip the shutter while standing alongside of the lens holding the dark slide to cast a shadow across the front element. I carry the holder in a Lee case with all the step-up rings (from 49mm to 82mm) attached for quick access in the field. The Cokin X-Pro filter holder will accommodate lens with larger front element threads but it is enormous.

    Thomas

  6. #26
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by tgtaylor View Post
    Ever since getting into LF I've used a Cokin Z-Pro filter holder with resin and now glass 100mm filters. The best advise with this system would be to start with a 95mm filter holder adapter ring and use step-down rings to fit your various lens. With the 95mm filter holder adapter I can use filters on the 610 and 760mm apo-Nikkors, and the 300mm Nikkor - all of which have 95mm threads. Trip the shutter while standing alongside of the lens holding the dark slide to cast a shadow across the front element. I carry the holder in a Lee case with all the step-up rings (from 49mm to 82mm) attached for quick access in the field. The Cokin X-Pro filter holder will accommodate lens with larger front element threads but it is enormous.

    Thomas
    I've ordered a large format Chamonix 45H-1. http://www.chamonixviewcamera.com/cameras/45h1 I already have a medium format with 77mm glass MC lenses from B+W that screw in the MF lenses. So I'm thinking of getting a 58mm to 77mm adaptor for the 4x5 lens (Schneider 150mm APO Synnar MC) to attach the glass lenses (yellow, red, orange and polarizer), then use the Cokin just for the grad ND. I have the same Cokin you have that I use with my medium format setup.

    Can compendium hoods be used with this set up? Any other recommendations?

  7. #27

    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

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    I use Lee Filters' 100mm filter holder, but it's inconvenient to use it in the adapter ring, so I made a L-bracket to attach the 100mm filter holder to the accessory-shoe without the adapter rings. The same goes for Lee Filters' Wide Angle Hood.
    Also, I have made three circular filter adapters that can be pushed into the body of a lenses.

    With these devices, I can insert square filters and round filters individually.
    Chamonix 45N-2, Chamonix 45H-1

  8. #28

    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

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    I also attach the Wide Angle Hood to the accessory-shoe on the front standard without the adapter ring.
    The hood can move back and forth and can rotate left and right.
    This makes it easy to insert a circular filter in front of the lens.
    Chamonix 45N-2, Chamonix 45H-1

  9. #29

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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Like darr, i tend to use an Ebony lens shade clip:
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    Mike

  10. #30

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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    I never use the same filter size filter for a large format lens, just to avoid vigneting problems. My rule is add a 25% more size to avoid vigneting problems when generous shift is aplied. If lens has 67mm filter size, I use a 86mm filter with a good quality steep up adapter. For my most used filters (polarizing, and 81 series), I use 105mm and 86mm round glass filters from Heliopan and B+W. for the rest I use 100mm square filters from several brands, including Lee, Sinar Hitech..., and when possibleI place them back my Sinar DB Shutter. If I canīt do this, I use a Lee Filter Holder. In both cases, I Shade lens and filter with a Sinar multipurpose standard, with a standard bellows and a Sinar mask 2. This allows me to reach just the limits, of vigneting to avoid the excess of light from great image circle lenses hiting bellows and providing flare and loss of contrast. Before I had The Sinar Mask 2 I used a 5x7" black mate plastic piece with a clip to shade my lenses, but always having a look trough the corners of ground glass to shade just to the limits.

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