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Thread: Lens Filters for 4x5

  1. #11

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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    In studio use, stands with 'black cards/foam board are often used with a small boom or adjustable arm, to shield against excess light entering the non-hooded lens, some times more than one and at times, simply clamped to the stand.

    Good photographers are, as a type, IME, apt to grab hold of anything to make a shot 'work' and good photographers can be very much the "MacGyver, or at least use an assistant whom is so.

    Unless the job and clients/subject of a photo-shoot has a very high nose, and the studio/art director/company wants the shoot to be an 'event', which does happen, and everything has to be 'just right' and shiny from a store, you'll never know when you will run up against when a shoot is going on, and yes, a good Swiss Army Knife (SWK) and multi-tool is always a must, even in the smallest outing for a photo-shoot.

    So is thick cotton string or linen cord, baby pins, bank clips, corn starch and brush, tacks, Spring clamps in every size and so many other 'non-photographic' items, that you'll need endlessly

    IMO.

  2. #12

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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Yes, step-up adapters are the best way to handle having a non-vignetting system, esp for large format, and if you can get away with it when lens hood are employed.

    I would suggest a bellows lens hood for LF, having had occasion to use some, but the movements must be tight or you've just added a new dimension of head ache to whatever you are trying to photograph.

    The thing is, I know many of use have many filters in many sizes already, in each format we shoot, and are loath to spend more money on larger filters at some point, instead wanting to spend our funds on film, papers, new kit.

    I need some ND Filters, including an adjustable one and a good polarizer, and was looking at the testing of both, in larger than I would normally want, simply because I want to make the change to more adapter rings/anti-vignetting set-up, but U.S. $200 - $300 dollars is simply beyond the Pale of what I do, so I'll likely 'settle' for something else or none.

    That said, a light yellow-green is a must, if you are ever going to do B&W portraits of women and a medium Green brings out the 'ruggedness' of a close-up of a male subject.

    IMO.

  3. #13

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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Alan, I second everything Doremus said. Just get the step up ring and use the filters you already own. The best way to acquire LF accessories is to wait until you have enough experience to know what you need and will use, rather than try to buy everything beforehand. Ultimately you should probably do what Doremus has done, which is also what I have done: wait until you have more of a complete lens set (again, built up over time as you learn what you actually need for the images you want to make), then get screw on filters for the largest lens, and use step up rings for the smaller.

    Also, like Doremus, I don’t carry a compendium shade, I just shield the lens from flare using the dark slide I pull from the holder. If you try to carry every accessory you might use, and the “perfect” tripod and head, you will need a wheeled wagon to carry it all. Around 30 years ago, when my daughters were very young, we would read them a lovely book titled “Simple Pictures Are Best” and that philosophy can be applied to both our images and our equipment.

  4. #14
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    I'll have to deal with filters later. The camera is on the Fedex truck on its way to my house. 5 days from China. Check. The lens that I already received from Japan took about 3 days. Check. Film, some. Check. Shutter release, check. Tripod and head? Check. Flowers for wife? Oops.

  5. #15
    darr's Avatar
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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi7475 View Post
    Darr,

    can you point us to the cheap hoods you use?

    Thank you!
    Like this: https://smile.amazon.com/Fotasy-Nikk...8788278&sr=8-1

    I also have a few rubber hoods that fold down when packed. I like metal for protection and rubber for less weight.
    Website: photoscapes.com
    Photo Blog: darrlene.com

  6. #16
    Joe O'Hara's Avatar
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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Alan: You still have time to get the flowers. Don't forget! (She won't.)

    Personally I use a Lee (rectangular) hood on every single photograph I make. It is expensive and clumsy but I have never
    had a problem with vignetting. Truthfully, it is obvious on the ground glass (you can wiggle the hood a little to be sure) when
    it happens. I find I only have to pay special attention if I'm using a lot of front rise.

    Flare from the large image circle is probably a bigger issue with say 210 or 150mm lenses, less so with telephotos and extreme
    wide angles that don't cover the image area so generously. Not to gainsay what Doremus said, multicoating is your friend, but
    not necessarily your rescuer.

    The late Michael A. Smith was quite adamant about always using lens hoods. I took his advice to heart and have not regretted
    it.

    On the other hand if you're just starting out in LF it's definitely a second-order issue, until you get all the other moving parts
    under control.
    Where are we going?
    And why are we in this handbasket?


    www.josephoharaphotography.com

  7. #17

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    Lens Filters for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe O'Hara View Post
    Alan: You still have time to get the flowers. Don't forget! (She won't.)

    Personally I use a Lee (rectangular) hood on every single photograph I make. It is expensive and clumsy but I have never
    had a problem with vignetting. Truthfully, it is obvious on the ground glass (you can wiggle the hood a little to be sure) when
    it happens. I find I only have to pay special attention if I'm using a lot of front rise.

    Flare from the large image circle is probably a bigger issue with say 210 or 150mm lenses, less so with telephotos and extreme
    wide angles that don't cover the image area so generously. Not to gainsay what Doremus said, multicoating is your friend, but
    not necessarily your rescuer.

    The late Michael A. Smith was quite adamant about always using lens hoods. I took his advice to heart and have not regretted
    it.

    On the other hand if you're just starting out in LF it's definitely a second-order issue, until you get all the other moving parts
    under control.
    The Lee hood is great.... itís just that it is outrageously expensive IMO.....

  8. #18
    Joe O'Hara's Avatar
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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Indeed it is expensive. I had the old square one and used it for years until it fell apart. When I asked for a replacement,
    they basically told me too bad, buy a new one. Nice!

    For what they charge, they could and should do better, but probably think they don't have to. (Hint: A modest discount
    would go a ways to keeping your customer happy and bringing you more customers in the future.)

    So I sucked it up and bought the new rectangular one. I hope that by the time I wear it out there will be a few used
    ones on the market. I wouldn't have given them the business if it weren't such an essential tool for me.
    Where are we going?
    And why are we in this handbasket?


    www.josephoharaphotography.com

  9. #19
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Joe, I'll get the flowers tomorrow. Today we all went out to celebrate my wife's mother's 97th birthday. God bless her. Nice lady.

    Can you use a hood with Lee filters?

    PS you;re about an hour south of me. I've driven through a couple of roads in the Pine Barrens briefly. No photography though. I like your work of them and your other photos. Very nice.

  10. #20

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    Re: Lens Filters for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    Joe, I'll get the flowers tomorrow. Today we all went out to celebrate my wife's mother's 97th birthday. God bless her. Nice lady.

    Can you use a hood with Lee filters?

    PS you;re about an hour south of me. I've driven through a couple of roads in the Pine Barrens briefly. No photography though. I like your work of them and your other photos. Very nice.
    Lens hoods canít really work on a view camera as they will rarely be the proper length to be effective with most focal lengths and will easily vignette with many movements.
    The compendium is the only way to go. Especially ones that are designed to adjust with front movements and can be masked to compensate for focal length of the lens.

    The best compendiums will be able to adjust to match the lens to film distance and have a front opening the size of the film or masks to adjust to the size. These compendiums, properly adjusted, block all extraneous light.

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