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Thread: of Ground Glass, Goethe and Grandagons

  1. #1

    of Ground Glass, Goethe and Grandagons

    I'm curious: for those of you who have used the 75/90 Grandagons in both f/4.5 and f/6.8, just how important was that extra stop of light to you out in the field in terms of having a brighter GG to work with?

    I'm in the process of sifting through wide angle options for the Horseman HF, so all things being equal, the 75/6.8 with its 58mm filter seems the logical choice, but since I do a lot of work under canopy, "more light" is always appreciated.

    Any thoughts appreciated...

  2. #2

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    Re: of Ground Glass, Goethe and Grandagons

    Years ago I bought the Grandagon 75mm f/4.5, and the Grandagon f/6.8 90mm because they both took a 67mm filter. I tried to standardize filters and use step up rings for the smaller lenses. Also the 4.5 75mm has a bit more coverage than the f/6.8 75mm lens. I bought them for architectural work.

  3. #3

    Re: of Ground Glass, Goethe and Grandagons

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Opheim View Post
    I bought the 75mm 4.5, and the 6.8 90mm because they both took a 67mm filter.
    Yes, I've definitely been trying to "rationalize" filter threads lately--ironically, my "compact" 4x5 kit lenses all seem to take bigger filters than those I use with my 5x7. (FWIW, because a lens with greater than a 65mm rear cell diameter won't work with the Horseman, my f/4.5 options would be limited to the 75mm Grandagon and Nikon 75/4.5.)

  4. #4

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    Re: of Ground Glass, Goethe and Grandagons

    CB, please enlighten my ignorance. Does your Horseman have a Graflok/international or a spring back?

    I ask because I use a 35/4.5 Apo-Grandagon and a 58/5.6 Grandagon on my 2x3 Century Graphic, which has a Graflok back. Both lenses have rear cells that won't clear the Century's tiny lens throat. I attach the lenses to the camera by unscrewing rear cell from shutter, mounting shutter with front cell, removing the Graflok focusing panel and screwing the rear cell back into the shutter. Fiddly, but that's how it has to be done.

  5. #5

    Re: of Ground Glass, Goethe and Grandagons

    Reprint DII Rock Bridge 3 by Nokton48, on Flickr

    Reprint DII Rock Bridge 1 by Nokton48, on Flickr

    A Clockmaker friend welded together a very deeply recessed Sinar Norma Board, to hold a Graflex XL 58mm F5.6 Grandagon. The cable release assembly is custom also and JB Welded onto the XL Shutter. Covers 9x12cm full circle, and focused hyperfocally, -almost- 4x5". You can just see all four corners in these photos. Steve Simmons wrote a View Camera article that gave me the idea to build this. Great lens at the time for really wide architectural interiors.

    I bought the 90mm F4.5 Grandagon, and also the 115mm F6.8 lenses, they were bright to look through and easy to focus. I was shooting 4x5 commercial architectural chromes at the time.
    Last edited by Daniel Unkefer; 3-Jan-2020 at 16:28.
    “The secret of getting ahead is getting started.”
    ― Mark Twain

  6. #6

    Re: of Ground Glass, Goethe and Grandagons

    Geology by Nokton48, on Flickr

    Graflex XL 58mm F5.6 Grandagon on 4x5 Sinar Norma
    “The secret of getting ahead is getting started.”
    ― Mark Twain

  7. #7

    Re: of Ground Glass, Goethe and Grandagons

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    CB, please enlighten my ignorance.

    Fiddly, but that's how it has to be done.
    Ha, little chance of that, it's just that I'm trying to keep "fiddly" out of the equation as much as possible (when things get dropped in my part of the world they can roll a long way.) Luckily, I tend to work on the short tele end, anyway--I'm concerned even 75mm might leave me feeling sullied and unusual.

    Daniel, thanks for the data point as well.

  8. #8

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    Re: of Ground Glass, Goethe and Grandagons

    Well, you don't have to get a modern wasp-waisted 75. My 75 is an f/14 Perigraphe VIa. It covers 105 degrees. Short Perigraphe VIas are in barrels that can fairly easily be stuffed into the front of an Ilex #3.

    From the front standard's point of view, easy on, easy off.

    Downsides? f/14, no available -- there were no original issue either -- center filter will fit, and uncommon. You can't have everything ...

  9. #9

    Re: of Ground Glass, Goethe and Grandagons

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    My 75 is an f/14 Perigraphe VIa.
    Very cool--I don't know anything about French optics (though a quick search of Flickr shows a lot of folks are adapting Berthiot projection lenses to indulge their bokeh addictions.) At any rate, it's neat that folks are maintaining that connection with the urban European past...it's been a while since I pulled Thomas Mann off the shelf, but I think I'll be off to the magic mountain just as soon as I remember what to do with a cravat.

  10. #10

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    Re: of Ground Glass, Goethe and Grandagons

    I have a 6.8 and have no problems because of the aperture. It doe save weight in my pack.

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