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Thread: Ansco 130 - 1:1 or 1:2?

  1. #1

    Ansco 130 - 1:1 or 1:2?

    The instructions from Photo Formulary are 1:1 for normal contrast and 1:2 for softer results.

    In actuality this difference isn't so important to me. I'm sure I could get similar results by changing filtration... However, I'm calibrating my RH Analyser tonight so I'm wondering if there is any specific reason why I should pick one dilution over the other. Once I make the calibrations, well there you go.

    Also I've read that it needs a working temp of about 70F for the glycin to be active, any truth to this?

    I'll be calibrating Multigrade Classic Glossy and the new MG RC from Ilford, also in glossy.

  2. #2

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    Re: Ansco 130 - 1:1 or 1:2?

    SD, I've used Ansco 130 from PF for years and it's my favourite developer. I always dilute it 1:2 & don't find it too soft.... my negatives aren't bulletproof either. I try to maintain 20C (68 F) during processing.

  3. #3

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    Re: Ansco 130 - 1:1 or 1:2?

    When I tested, and used, F-130 in the 1990s I found that 1:2 worked well, but that a 3-minute development time was best. And certainly it worked better at warmer temps.
    I gave up using it in my semi-heated basement darkroom (in the NE) because the results were not worth the extra time (it adds up) and the cost.
    I also found that with the cold-tone papers I was using then, the choice of paper developers made titles difference in the look of the finished prints.
    YRMV of course- if you're doing proper testing I'm sure you'll find a good method. Best of luck!

  4. #4
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Ansco 130 - 1:1 or 1:2?

    The question is about paper development, not film. I've used it many years at 1:3, with quite a variety of papers, but all FB. "Hardness" vs "softness" is just a function of time vs relative concentration, so being a bit more dilute is more economical, and contrast can be boosted with just a little more time. Depending on the specific paper and look I want, this time can vary anywhere between 1-1/2 and 4 minutes. Sticking with just one standardized time is a straightjacket; but if you feel compelled to work with rigid die-cast programmable methodology, it's your call. I prefer to have time available as itself a tool. Glycin is fairly tolerant of temp variation; hydroquinone might not be. So image color can be affected somewhat by warmer versus cooler temps relative to 20C "room temp", and most certainly by dev time. The degree of oxidation of glycin can also be a factor. Unopened bottles of glycin are kept in the freezer until needed; otherwise the characteristics of the glycin shift, as does the color of the powder itself.

  5. #5

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    Re: Ansco 130 - 1:1 or 1:2?

    I generally use Ansco 130 at 1:1 for 1 - 3 mins development time at 68F. Mix it myself from raw chemicals.

  6. #6

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    Re: Ansco 130 - 1:1 or 1:2?

    Shadows/lower midtones tend to print very deep/rich/dark with this developer... So more dilution to help hold shadow detail...

    I prefer 130 when shooting in bright sunlight with brilliant highlights, where I'm printing into the range of the highlights, but the shadows can go dark with a "graphic" effect (Ala Weston etc)...

  7. #7
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Ansco 130 - 1:1 or 1:2?

    I find 130 extremely versatile; soft scale, hard scale, delicate shadows, bold shadows, no problem for me. I use other developers too. But if I want graphic Brett Weston shadows, I just lop off a zone or two from TMax by underexposing and overdeveloping it, and let the long straight line do the work. Then I've got it, whether I use amidol or glycin 130 or some MQ tweak, no difference (though I do select developers with respect to specific image color). But I guess one could segregate their negatives into different different sessions, each using a somewhat different dilution of the same developer, or perhaps start the session with strong developer, then dilute it later for other
    kinds of images. We each seem to explore our own path, which is fine.

  8. #8

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    Re: Ansco 130 - 1:1 or 1:2?

    I also use it 1:2 for 3 minutes but have left prints bathing for up to 5 minutes to see if I can get anything else from the highlights, or shadows.
    notch codes ? I only use one film...

  9. #9

    Re: Ansco 130 - 1:1 or 1:2?

    I’m starting with 1:1 if only because I had mixed a batch at that dilution. Hopefully I won’t feel the need to recalibrate at a later time but given my general curiosity I imagine I will hah.

  10. #10

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    Re: Ansco 130 - 1:1 or 1:2?

    Drew's point: "Sticking with just one standardized time is a straightjacket" should be well-taken.
    My standard developing time is 2:30 with LPD 1:2 or Dektol 1:2 but found that this was not suitable when using Ansco 130 1:1 or 1:2 and had to make adjustments in the development time depending on the paper being used.

    Ansco 130 is definitely worth the effort.

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