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Thread: Chamonix 45-N2

  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2006
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    North Orange County, Southern California
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    Chamonix 45-N2

    Those of you who use a Chamonix 45-n2, what do you do when you need to tilt or swing the front standard or want to use rise or fall and wish to avoid vignetting?

    I have owned my Chamonix 45 N2 for several years and I struggle with the non-pleated portion of the bellows at the front standard.

    Do you have any work-around?

    Yes, I know I could just not photograph the scene but I feel that is not an option when I am responding to a scene.

    Now I know I have opened a can of worms but I will filter through all the off handed remarks and look for any positive points.

    Thanks for all the responses.

    Gary

    I see there is another post that is similar to my question. It looks like a universal bellows might solve my problem.
    I will leave this post here but if the moderators wish to move or delete I am fine with that.
    "People take different roads seeking fulfillment and happiness. Just because they're not on your road doesn't mean they've gotten lost." - H. Jackson Brown

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    78

    Re: Chamonix 45-N2

    I move the bellows out of the way, first by pushing it on the outside of the back of lens, then by taping it to the front standard. Yes, it can be a hassle, but I use the camera I have. Please show a picture of your problem, I could have not completely understood.

    Sent fra min SM-G975F via Tapatalk

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 1998
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    Oregon and Austria
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    Re: Chamonix 45-N2

    If your present bellows has a pleated portion toward the rear and a non-pleated (bag-style) portion at the front, then you have the universal bellows. I don't have a Chamonix, but I work with a field camera with similar bellows all the time (Wista SW with the wide-angle bellows, which is half pleated, half bag).

    Are you saying that the bag portion of the bellows somehow impinges on the image when you use movements? If so, then you need to ensure that the bellows stays out of the way when shooting.

    One classic solution is to have a ring taped to the mid-part of the bellows (the forward-most pleat would likely be good in your case) that you can loop over a hook or the like on the top of the camera body or on the front standard. Many long bellows came this way; the bellows was simply hooked back when not using a lot of draw to keep it from sagging into the image.

    Another, simpler, alternative is to simply remove the camera back before shooting and push the offending part of the bellows out of the image area. This, of course, assumes that it will stay put long enough for you to make the image.

    Other solutions include wedging something soft, like a cloth of sponge, between the bottom of the bellows and the camera bed to keep the bellows from sagging and taping it to one of the standards (use easily-removable tape!).

    For what it's worth, my universal-style bellows have never really given me much of a headache in this department. I don't think they are as long as the Chamonix bellows though. I'd try installing a ring and hook first and see if that solves your problem.

    Best,

    Doremus

  4. #4

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    Dec 2014
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    Re: Chamonix 45-N2

    What lens are you using? are you sure it is not an image circle issue? I have only run into bellows sag issue with a 300MM lens and I just propped it up in the middle. I have the universal bellows.
    Adventure is worthwhile in itself. ... Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn't be done. -- Amelia Earhart
    http://www.searing.photography

  5. #5

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    Sep 1998
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    Re: Chamonix 45-N2

    Quote Originally Posted by esearing View Post
    What lens are you using? are you sure it is not an image circle issue? I have only run into bellows sag issue with a 300MM lens and I just propped it up in the middle. I have the universal bellows.
    I wanted to ask this too. Maybe we should see a negative?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Orange County, Southern California
    Posts
    125

    Re: Chamonix 45-N2

    Thanks for the responses and I will try to provide additional info as soon as I can.

    1.) In the latest case of vignetting I was working on some table top photos using a 150 mm lens with some swing and tilt of the front standard and a tilt back of the rear standard of the camera.
    2.) The vignetting happens not only with a 150 mm lens but also with a 210 mm and 300 mm lens.

    The bottom line is this: vignetting happens any time I try to use movements of the front standard.

    The suggestion that I use a small cloth sponge under the bellows would possibly help, but my position is why should I have to. The camera and bellows should do their job without getting in the way., especially for what I call an expensive camera.

    If I need to fabricate a ring to go around the bellows and use a stabilizing rod of some sort then that is what I will try to do. I will also try to find a small cloth sponge.
    I might have a negative to post but I will need to get it scanned first.
    "People take different roads seeking fulfillment and happiness. Just because they're not on your road doesn't mean they've gotten lost." - H. Jackson Brown

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